eLearning and Technology

Assessing soft skills in PBL

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Mon, 2016-08-29 14:21


Kelli McGraw, Aug 29, 2016

As is so often the case, an answer to what appears to be a simple questions results in layers of complexity. Even the question itself bears examining (is it a marketing ploy? for example). It is essentially this: should problem-based learning employ an assessment grid to evaluate soft skills? The answer takes us through four sets of resources, each of which merits more investigation on its own:

When I saw 'essential fluencies' the first thing I thought of were my own 'critical literacies'. It reminds me that all of this thinking has been done before and though the approaches are very different I should be sure I understand what's already out there before proposing to change it. I also remarked to myself as I read through these the degree of commercial and private sector involvement in the development and  marketing of these models.

 

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Analysing writing

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Mon, 2016-08-29 14:21


Doug Peterson, doug — off the record, Aug 29, 2016

Doug Peterson introduces us to a lovely application called FoxType, which I tried out this morning. Essentially, the idea is that it provides a number of services to help you understand your own writing. The most visually appealing is the parser, which will diagram your sentence as you write. But iit also assesses sentences for things like politeness and vocabulary. Some of these are very arbitrary - I, for example, would consider writing in the first person to be more polite, and less stuffy and formal. FoxType takes the opposite view. But who cares? The ultimate goal here (in the 'still to come' department) is to create a general writing scaffold. It will help you write well as you write. This is the tip of a much larger iceberg.

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SLOs for a Real Education

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Mon, 2016-08-29 02:16


Karl Fisch, The Fischbowl, Aug 28, 2016

This post links to a  new podcast from Michael Wesch (which I've already added to Ed Radio). Wesch is quoted: "we have to help them achieve all this within a bureaucratic structure that demands that we frame our goals in a few neat bullet points at the top of our syllabus in a section called: Student Learning Outcomes, often called SLOs." Here are the SLOs Wesch really wants to write:

  1. Ask questions that burn in their soul and take them farther than they ever thought possible.
  2. Open themselves up to others and new experiences, to challenge their taken-for-granted assumptions
  3. Cross rivers of doubt and conquer mountains of fear to set themselves free.

Stripped of the adjectives, this is actually a pretty good set of outcomes: ask questions, be open to new experiences, and conquer one's fears. Fisch comments, 'I wonder why it is that we shy away from discussions around outcomes such as these, and obsess over measuring how our students do on discrete, isolated skills that very few of them will ever need to actually use."

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The State of Virtual Reality in Education

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2016-08-29 02:04

By Tanya Roscorla, Center for Digital Education

Until recently, the expensive price tag for virtual reality technology has limited its use in education. Full immersion into an alternate reality has been expensive for schools and universities to dive into — that is, until the last 12 months: Virtual reality is attracting educators who want to give students hands-on experiences with a lot of different tools. This type of technology immerses students into a different world full of sites and sounds, whether it’s a simulation of the cockpit of an airplane, a human body or Paris. More expensive immersion setups turn an entire room into a world with 360-degree interactive displays, while others use headsets or insert phones into a viewer that covers the users’ eyes. About nine major companies are vying for control of this space, said Brad Waid, an education futurist.

http://www.centerdigitaled.com/higher-ed/The-State-of-Virtual-Reality-in-Education.html

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How to align academic offerings to meet workforce development needs

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2016-08-29 02:02

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

A new study from Indeed.com lists computer and information sciences, engineering, architecture, management, health professions and finance as the top areas which have high needs in hiring, and low areas where technology can replace human capital in the workforce. Each of these fields were among the most popular academic programs of 2014, according to data on degrees awarded published by the U.S. Department of Education. According to Indeed, the programs comprise 92% of jobs showing trending upward in earning potential and offering an average salary of over $57,700.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/how-to-align-academic-offerings-to-meet-workforce-development-needs/424934/

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‘Smartphone As Learning Tool Can Reach Millions’

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2016-08-29 02:01

by Byju Raveendran, Business World

Seventy per cent of the India K-12 segment has access to a smartphone, and this percentage is fast increasing. This gives an opportunity to use smartphone as a learning device and app as a medium to reach millions of students. This can solve the problem of access. There is also a lot of scope for improvement in the way students learn. Today, learning is still driven by the fear of exams, and not the love for learning. There is so much focus on the end result of marks and grades that students miss out on the fun of real learning. If students learn in the right way, and if they like learning, they will secure good marks anyway. We are all getting trained to solve questions, but not to find problems. If we can have a system which encourages students to take the initiative to learn on their own, with parents and teachers playing supporting roles, it will help them reach their true potential.

http://businessworld.in/article/-Smartphone-As-Learning-Tool-Can-Reach-Millions-/23-08-2016-104697/

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The MOOC revolution that wasn't

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2016-08-28 20:16


Audrey Watters, The Daily Dot, Aug 28, 2016

'Tis the season to dissect the "failure" of MOOCs - or, to be specific, the rarefied Silicon Valley version of MOOCs, which is all anyone ever talks about. That narrative was that "MOOC startups Udacity, Coursera, and edX all promised that their free online courses with massive enrollment figures would 'democratize education.'" Of course that didn't happen. More interesting is what these MOOCs identified as the core value proposition. "“ At the end of the day, the true value proposition of education is employment,” Thrun told Fast Company... This new narrative,  according to George Siemens, one of the originators of the MOOC concept, casts education as simply skills training." But of course that's not democratization at all. The objective of education is and ought to be personal empowerment, to help people become less dependent on, say, a job, and more able to build networks, innovate, create value, and achieve purpose in life. But it takes more than just free content to support that. It takes a community, a network.

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Why America’s MOOC pioneers have abandoned ship

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2016-08-28 20:16


Jonathan Rees, More or Less Bunk, Aug 28, 2016

Jonathan Rees citing Alex Usher is a bit like Bernie Sanders citing Ronald Reagan. There's an incongruity there.  Usher's point is that MOOCs never made money. I don't think Rees lost any sleep over that (quite the contrary; I think he would have been worried were MOOCs hauling in the cash). Rees defends the traditional approach. "Traditional education with its inefficiency derived from the close proximity between professors and their students has proved more resilient than its wannabe disruptors ever imagined." Why? "Online courses without a live crew manning them can be very lonely experiences." But the Silicon Valley MOOCs were always an outlier, despite the hype they got from the Silicon Valley press. Conviviality and sociability have been the hallmarks of online learning since the beginning, and Silicon Valley ignored that history at its own expense.

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Flipping Large Classes: Three Strategies to Engage Students

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2016-08-28 02:07

By: Barbi Honeycutt, Faculty Focus

“How can I flip a large class?” I like this question because it’s not asking whether you can flip a large class, but rather what’s the best way to do it. Faculty who teach large classes are challenged not only by the sheer number of students but also by the physical space in the classroom. Having 100, 200, or 400+ students in class means teaching in large lecture halls with stadium seating and seats that are bolted to the floor. It’s not exactly the ideal space for collaboration and group discussions, so the types of flipped and active learning strategies you can use are more limited. Often, faculty fall back on the “think, pair, share” format or use clicker questions to encourage student engagement. But there are other techniques we can deploy in these large classrooms to engage students and involve them in higher levels of critical thinking and analysis.

http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/blended-flipped-learning/flipping-large-classes-three-strategies-engage-students/

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How workforce learning trends may shape higher ed

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2016-08-28 02:04

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

Technology is reshaping the way industries and corporations are training employees to increase productivity, according to EdSurge, and that new focus, designed to engage younger employees, could have impact on higher education academic delivery models. Organizations are substituting theory-based models in exchange for scenario-based, practical instruction to help learners be more attuned to instruction. Lessons are delivered through simulations that are light on lectures and heavy on opportunities for learners to engage with online content and cohort members to learn information. Adapting teaching modules presents the biggest challenge in workforce development; about 61% of corporate executives say moving employees towards self-directed education is a difficulty in developing an environment of continuous learning.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/how-workforce-learning-trends-may-shape-higher-ed/424868/

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Online Learning: Fashion Education’s Next Frontier

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2016-08-28 02:02

by Helena Pike, Business of Fashion

Over the last decade, online learning has reshaped the global education sector by improving access to knowledge and institutions, and enabling students to overcome geographical or financial limitations to access the best lecturers, curricula and institutions in the world. Initially, online learning was held back by concerns over quality and legitimacy, but as use of technology and access to the Internet has improved, and awareness of the convenience and standard of courses has grown — spurred on by the entrance of prestigious institutions like Harvard, MIT, Yale, Berkeley, Oxford and Cambridge University — the market has evolved rapidly. Online education has the potential to be equally game-changing for the fashion education sector. Previously, to get a good education, students had to be free to attend classes on a physical campus — meaning they had to live nearby and be able to afford not only institutions’ fees, but also not working a paid job for the duration of their studies.

https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/education/online-learning-fashion-educations-next-frontier-business-of-fashion-courses-2

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Podcast Club Development – Rob’s Social Ideas Exchange

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2016-08-27 20:02


Rob Watson, Rob Watson Media, Aug 27, 2016

This post offers me an opportunity to plug Ed Radio. I started Ed Radio in 2003, right at the  beginning of the age of podcasts. Here's what it  looked like back then. Today I harvest RSS feeds, extract the references to MP3 files, and redistribute the collection of links in the form of a daily podcast feed. If you are producing a podcast in the field of learning, new media, or education technology, drop me a line and I'll add it to my list.

This post is Rob Watson describing his upcoming podcast "based around the idea of what it means to be sociable in the Twenty-First Century." he's investing in audio quality, as he should: "I’ ve invested in some recording equipment, with a Zoom H6 multichannel recorder with four mono microphones, and a line-in feed for music input. I’ m also hoping that we can use a friends coffee shop as our base for recording the sessions, as its a great environment to relax and chill." I'm looking forward to it.

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Charter Schools: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2016-08-27 20:02


John Oliver, YouTube, HBO, Aug 27, 2016

John Oliver examines the performance of charter schools in the United States and finds enough wrong with them to fill an 18 minute comedy video. As we can see from this report, while government may be less efficient, businesses are much less likely to behave responsibly or obey the law, which means the private sector cannot be trusted with high-stakes enterprises like education. Actually, as we see in this report, government is not less efficient either, with charter schools accounting for some of the worst outcomes in the school system. There are ways to promote choice, but privatizing the school system isn't among them.

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3 Ways Virtual Reality Can Enhance Learning

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2016-08-27 02:08

3 Ways Virtual Reality Can Enhance Learning

by Emory Craig, Maya Georgieva, EDUCAUSE Review

https://youtu.be/jRQzl8ewDMQ



http://er.educause.edu/multimedia/2016/8/video-3-ways-virtual-reality-can-enhance-learning

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Microsoft Updates Office 365 Education

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2016-08-27 02:05

By Michael Hart, THE Journal

Microsoft has added new features to its Office 365 Education portfolio of products for students and teachers. In April, the company released Microsoft Classroom, which provides course management operations for teachers. For school IT staff, an updated Windows Imaging and Configuration Designer tool would let them set up shared devices in bulk for classroom scenarios where students share devices. Finally, an updated release of Windows 10 offered Windows Ink, a technology that enables the user to write on his or her device as if it were paper. Now, Microsoft has introduced two new features in time for the new school year. First, a version of Microsoft Classroom and a new software product called School Data Sync will help IT administrators connect existing school systems to Office 365, enabling a single sign-on for teachers and students while automating Microsoft Classroom set-up.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/08/18/microsoft-adds-new-features-to-office-365-education.aspx Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_19238') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_19238') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_19238') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_19238'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_19238') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

Report: 3D Printing Market to Double by 2020

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2016-08-27 02:02

By Joshua Bolkan, THE Journal

The 3D printing market will reach $35.4 billion in 2020, according to a new report form International Data Corp. (IDC). That total is more than double the revenue projected for this year and would constitute a 24.1 percent compound annual growth rate over the course of the period forecast. “While 3D printers and materials will represent nearly half the total worldwide revenues throughout the forecast, software and related services will also experience significant growth,” according to a news release. “Revenues for computer-aided design (CAD) software are forecast to triple over the five-year forecast period while the market for on-demand parts services will nearly match this growth. The gains in both software and on-demand parts printing are being driven by the rapidly expanding use of 3D printing for design prototyping and products that require a high degree of customization in non-traditional environments.”

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/08/17/report-3d-printing-market-to-double-by-2020.aspx

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Why No One Remembers Those Who Struggle for Peace

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2016-08-26 19:51


Adam Hochschild, Utne Reader, Aug 26, 2016

I was at the football game last night, and as usual, there was the tribute to the troops. We should reconsider who we set up role models in society. If the only people we honour for service to the public are those who go to war, there will be a ceaseless demand for more war. I can think of many more who make sacrifices for the pubic good: doctors, postal workers, embassy officials, environmental activists, child welfare advocates, and many many more. Children learn by adopting role models, and we want to make sure they have as many anti-war advocates to choose from as they do warriors.

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Once a fad, gaming is gaining steam in higher education classrooms and in research

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2016-08-26 02:10

by Laura Devaney, eCampus News

Gaming in education has traditionally belonged to the K-12 sphere, but in recent years higher education has taken a vested interest in this learning approach, from taking a game-based approach in classrooms to ensuring future educators learn the merits of it. In recent years, gaming has gained momentum in higher education. Research indicates it is a viable learning approach, with faculty gamifying lessons and student teachers learning how to use the approach with future students. MIT, Penn State, and UC Irvine are all among schools leveraging game-based learning.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/gaming/gaming-higher-education/

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How an Aussie teaching innovation was backed by Bill Gates and swept US universities

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2016-08-26 02:04

by Tim Dodd, Financial Review

Dr Ben-Naim said he was very pleased to be bringing the adaptive learning delivered courses back to Australia where Smart Sparrow’s technology was developed. “It’s an Australian innovation which has had significant success in America and now we are able to bring it back to Australia. For us it’s very exciting,” he said. He said that the teacher’s role was not diminished by using the adaptive and multi-disciplinary approach to learning in the Inspark network, where students absorbed the key concepts online outside of the classroom. “They [students] still come to class and compare work, they work in small groups on a different problems, and the teacher has the opportunity to talk about something more advanced,” Dr Ben-Naim said. “We can make more students smarter in less time. We optimise the learning and the teacher time.”

http://www.afr.com/leadership/innovation/how-an-aussie-teaching-innovation-was-backed-by-bill-gates-and-swept-us-universities-20160818-gqvnep

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North Dakota University System sees gains in online courses

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2016-08-26 02:02

by Wade Rupard, Bismark Tribune

As students within the North Dakota University System continue to take more online classes, schools within the system are working to enhance those courses. In a presentation to the North Dakota Legislature’s Interim Higher Education Committee on Friday, Richard Rothaus, the university system’s vice chancellor for academic and student affairs, outlined how the system is accommodating students who take non-traditional classes, such as those online. The construct of what makes a typical student in today’s technology-filled world has been blurred, Rothaus said, noting 21,824 students systemwide took online courses in fall 2015. Some of those students took classes entirely online, while others enrolled in both traditional and nontraditional courses.

http://bismarcktribune.com/news/state-and-regional/north-dakota-university-system-sees-gains-in-online-courses/article_d3a51afc-0362-5635-8b96-42a0429803a9.html

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