nursing informatics

Bibliometric Patterns of Research Literature Production on Nursing Informatics Competence.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2016-08-23 19:21
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Bibliometric Patterns of Research Literature Production on Nursing Informatics Competence.

J Nurs Educ. 2015 Oct;54(10):565-71

Authors: Kokol P, Vošner HB, Železnik D, Vošner J, Saranto K

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Nursing informatics competence is a prerequisite for successful information management, evidence-based practices optimizing patient care health promotion, and communication with information communication technology-literate patients.
METHOD: The aim of this study was to assess the trends in the production of nursing informatics competence research literature and to identify the most productive bibliometric entities. In addition to the correspondence analysis, bibliometric analysis and mapping were used to achieve the aim.
RESULTS: A total of 366 information sources were extracted, 14.5% of which were sponsored studies. The production of research literature on nursing informatics competence is growing, but this research is only occasionally published in the most recognized nursing journals.
CONCLUSION: Identifying where the intensive research on nursing informatics competence is beneficial to care for the patient of the future and building user-friendly online lifelong learning platforms, where a required level of nursing informatics competence could be acquired, are two gaps in the current research that should be covered in future.

PMID: 26431516 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Research in nursing informatics 2014.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-08-17 22:08
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Research in nursing informatics 2014.

Nurs Adm Q. 2015 Apr-Jun;39(2):E9-E16

Authors: Carrington JM, Tiase VL, Estrada N, Shea KD

Abstract
This article reflects the work done in the third year of the Nursing Informatics Year in Review project. This project seeks to search and analyze articles written by nurses as first author on the subject of nursing informatics, published August 2013-August 2014. Each year we also seek recommended articles from our American Medical Informatics Association-Nursing Informatics Work Group (AMIA-NIWG) members that meet the same criteria as the search and most influenced their thinking and scholarship. Twenty-seven articles emerged from the literature review, and our AMIA-NIWG members recommended 32 articles. We analyzed the articles by journal of publication, country of first author, source of funding, research method, research setting, and area of focus. The purpose of this article was to present the results of this project for 2014.

PMID: 25714959 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Summary of the nursing informatics year in review 2014.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-08-17 22:08
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Summary of the nursing informatics year in review 2014.

Nurs Adm Q. 2015 Apr-Jun;39(2):183-4

Authors: Carrington JM

PMID: 25714957 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

[Evaluation of the computerized system of continuing education in nursing].

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sun, 2016-08-07 18:00
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[Evaluation of the computerized system of continuing education in nursing].

Rev Bras Enferm. 2014 May-Jun;67(3):457-61

Authors: Casteli CP, Casteli C, Leite MM

Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the data in the Computer System of Continuing Education in Nursing (SIEC), from the perspective of nurse specialists. In this exploratory study, seven experts attributed relevance / priority to the data set, through a questionnaire. The SIEC data set was evaluated with 70% of opinions, which confirms the user's satisfaction with respect to the content of the system, according to the Brazilian standard ISO / IEC 14598-1. Professional categories, institution and scientific production, data of technical visiting and professional skills of the teaching activity category, and the assessment report of the student category assessment were scored with borderline percentage of 71% (n=5). It was concluded that the SIEC data set is relevant / priority for Continuing Education Service, constituting a minimum data set required for this service.

PMID: 25054710 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

[Planning With Nanda, Noc, Nic Taxonomies In Neurologic Rehabilitation. A clinical study].

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[Planning With Nanda, Noc, Nic Taxonomies In Neurologic Rehabilitation. A clinical study].

Prof Inferm. 2015 Jul-Sep;68(3):163-8

Authors: Iori A, Foracchia M, Gradellini C

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Nursing classifications identify a specific professional responsibility, increase nursing visibility, according with nursing evolution of these last years.
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate care planning with NANDA taxonomy in neurologic rehabilitation context.
METHOD: Care plan managing with NANDA taxonomy, regarding diagnosis of constipation and impaired skin integrity, using a computerized tool for systematically observation, organized in check list.
RESULTS: Registered data with taxonomy planning are higher in quantitative and qualitative terms. For most of patients (87%) one diagnosis has been opened, both diagnosis for 60% of them.
CONCLUSION: Nursing care plan with NANDA taxonomy can be considered a valid methodology of care for neurologic patient, this since it requests a deep and complete registration of first assessment a systematically registration of each monitoring, it increases visibility of nursing job, and it underlines specific autonomy and responsibility in prevention and management of problems.

PMID: 26749548 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nurses told to engage more with technology.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2016-07-29 13:08
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Nurses told to engage more with technology.

Nurs Times. 2016 May 25-Jun 14;112(21-23):4

Authors:

PMID: 27396083 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

[Pragmatically finding trustworthy literature on the internet].

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2016-07-28 13:07
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[Pragmatically finding trustworthy literature on the internet].

Pflege Z. 2016 Apr;69(4):226-30

Authors: Burckhardt M, Langer G

PMID: 27214952 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Faculty and organizational characteristics associated with informatics/health information technology adoption in DNP programs.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Mon, 2016-07-25 09:56
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Faculty and organizational characteristics associated with informatics/health information technology adoption in DNP programs.

J Prof Nurs. 2014 Jul-Aug;30(4):292-9

Authors: Fulton CR, Meek JA, Walker PH

Abstract
Nursing informatics/health information technology are key components of graduate nursing education and an accreditation requirement, yet little is known about the extent to which doctor of nursing practice (DNP) curricula include these content domains. The purpose of this descriptive study was to elicit perceptions of DNP program directors relative to (a) whether and how the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's (AACN's) Essential IV standard has been met in their DNP programs; (b) whether the Technology Informatics Guiding Educational Reform Initiative Foundation's Phase II competencies have been integrated in their programs; and (c) the faculty and organizational characteristics associated with the adoption of the AACN's Essential IV. In 2011, an electronic survey was sent to all 138 DNP program directors identified on the AACN Web site with an 81.2% response rate. Findings include variation in whether and how programs have integrated informatics/health information technology content, a lack of informatics-certified and/or master's-prepared faculty, and a perceived lack of faculty awareness of informatics curricular guidelines. DNP program director and dean awareness and support of faculty informatics education, use of informatics competency guidelines, and national policy and stimulus funding support are recommended to promote curricular inclusion and the engagement of nurses in strong informatics practices.

PMID: 25150414 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Big data, data science, and big contributions.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2016-07-21 03:38
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Big data, data science, and big contributions.

Nurs Outlook. 2016 Mar-Apr;64(2):113-4

Authors: Broome ME

PMID: 26968085 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Advanced nursing practice and research contributions to precision medicine.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2016-07-21 03:38
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Advanced nursing practice and research contributions to precision medicine.

Nurs Outlook. 2016 Mar-Apr;64(2):117-23

Authors: Williams JK, Katapodi MC, Starkweather A, Badzek L, Cashion AK, Coleman B, Fu MR, Lyon D, Weaver MT, Hickey KT

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Genomic discoveries in the era of precision medicine hold the promise for tailoring healthcare, symptom management, and research efforts including targeting rare and common diseases through the identification and implementation of genomic-based risk assessment, treatment, and management. However, the translation of these discoveries into tangible benefits for the health of individuals, families, and the public is evolving.
PURPOSE: In this article, members of the Genetics Expert Panel identify opportunities for action to increase advanced practice nursing and research contributions toward improving genomic health for all individuals and populations.
DISCUSSION: Identified opportunities are within the areas of: bolstering genomic focused advanced practice registered nurse practice, research and education efforts; deriving new knowledge about disease biology, risk assessment, treatment efficacy, drug safety and self-management; improving resources and systems that combine genomic information with other healthcare data; and advocating for patient and family benefits and equitable access to genomic healthcare resources.

PMID: 26712384 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Toward Interoperability: A New Resource to Support Nursing Terminology Standards.

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Toward Interoperability: A New Resource to Support Nursing Terminology Standards.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Dec;33(12):515-9

Authors: Warren JJ, Matney SA, Foster ED, Auld VA, Roy SL

PMID: 26678815 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing students' knowledge and practices of standard precautions: A Jordanian web-based survey.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2016-06-28 16:23
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Nursing students' knowledge and practices of standard precautions: A Jordanian web-based survey.

Nurse Educ Today. 2015 Dec;35(12):1175-80

Authors: AL-Rawajfah OM, Tubaishat A

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The main purpose of this web-based survey was to evaluate Jordanian nursing students' knowledge and practice of standard precautions.
METHODS: A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. Six public and four private Jordanian universities were invited to participate in the study. Approximately, seventeen hundred nursing students in the participating universities were invited via the students' portal on the university electronic system. For schools without an electronic system, students received invitations sent to their personal commercial email.
RESULTS: The final sample size was 594 students; 65.3% were female with mean age of 21.2 years (SD=2.6). The majority of the sample was 3rd year students (42.8%) who had no previous experience working as nurses (66.8%). The mean total knowledge score was 13.8 (SD=3.3) out of 18. On average, 79.9% of the knowledge questions were answered correctly. The mean total practice score was 67.4 (SD=9.9) out of 80. There was no significant statistical relationship between students' total knowledge and total practice scores (r=0.09, p=0.032).
CONCLUSION: Jordanian nursing educators are challenged to introduce different teaching modalities to effectively translate theoretical infection control knowledge into safe practices.

PMID: 26043655 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing Knowledge: 2015 Big Data Science.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
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Nursing Knowledge: 2015 Big Data Science.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):427-31

Authors: Westra BL, Pruinelli L, Delaney CW

PMID: 26468968 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Data Visualization Techniques to Showcase Nursing Care Quality.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
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Data Visualization Techniques to Showcase Nursing Care Quality.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):417-26

Authors: Monsen KA, Peterson JJ, Mathiason MA, Kim E, Lee S, Chi CL, Pieczkiewicz DS

PMID: 26468967 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Usability of the Clinical Care Classification System for Representing Nursing Practice According to Specialty.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
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Usability of the Clinical Care Classification System for Representing Nursing Practice According to Specialty.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):448-55

Authors: Feng RC, Chang P

Abstract
This study examined the ability of the Clinical Care Classification system to represent nursing record data across various nursing specialties. The data comprised nursing care plan records from December 1998 to October 2008 in a medical center. The total number of care plan documentation we analyzed was 2 060 178, and we used a process of knowledge discovery in datasets for data analysis. The results showed that 75.42% of the documented diagnosis terms could be mapped using the Clinical Care Classification system. However, a difference in nursing terminology emerged among various nursing specialties, ranging from 0.1% for otorhinolaryngology to 100% for colorectal surgery and plastic surgery. The top five nursing diagnoses were identified as knowledge deficit, acute pain, infection risk, falling risk, and bleeding risk, which were the most common health problems in an acute care setting but not in non-acute care settings. Overall, we identified a total of 21 established nursing diagnoses, which we recommend adding to the Clinical Care Classification system, most of which are applicable to emergency and intensive care specialties. Our results show that Clinical Care Classification is useful for documenting patient's problems in an acute setting, but we suggest adding new diagnoses to identify health problems in specialty settings.

PMID: 26418298 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Use of Simulation to Study Nurses' Acceptance and Nonacceptance of Clinical Decision Support Suggestions.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
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Use of Simulation to Study Nurses' Acceptance and Nonacceptance of Clinical Decision Support Suggestions.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):465-72

Authors: Sousa VE, Lopez KD, Febretti A, Stifter J, Yao Y, Johnson A, Wilkie DJ, Keenan GM

Abstract
Our long-term goal was to ensure nurse clinical decision support works as intended before full deployment in clinical practice. As part of a broader effort, this pilot project explored factors influencing acceptance/nonacceptance of eight clinical decision support suggestions displayed in an electronic health record-based nursing plan of care software prototype. A diverse sample of 21 nurses participated in this high-fidelity clinical simulation experience and completed a questionnaire to assess reasons for accepting/not accepting the clinical decision support suggestions. Of 168 total suggestions displayed during the experiment (eight for each of the 21 nurses), 123 (73.2%) were accepted, and 45 (26.8%) were not accepted. The mode number of acceptances by nurses was seven of eight, with only two of 21 nurses accepting all. The main reason for clinical decision support acceptance was the nurse's belief that the suggestions were good for the patient (100%), with other features providing secondary reinforcement. Reasons for nonacceptance were less clear, with fewer than half of the subjects indicating low confidence in the evidence. This study provides preliminary evidence that high-quality simulation and targeted questionnaires about specific clinical decision support selections offer a cost-effective means for testing before full deployment in clinical practice.

PMID: 26361268 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Factors Affecting Nursing Students' Readiness and Perceptions Toward the Use of Mobile Technologies for Learning.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
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Factors Affecting Nursing Students' Readiness and Perceptions Toward the Use of Mobile Technologies for Learning.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):456-64

Authors: Zayim N, Ozel D

Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the current usage of mobile devices, preferences of mobile learning environments and examine the readiness of nursing students in a public university. In order to investigate preferences and attitudes with respect to mobile technology use in nursing education, 387 students at a state university have been surveyed. It has been observed that while students preferred their current portable laptops, those in higher classes were more inclined to favor mobile phones. The common problems of battery life and high cost of communication, both in smartphones and tablet systems, suggest that hardware quality and financial constraints seem to be two main factors in determining these technologies. While more than half of students expressed readiness for mobile learning, one quarter indicated indecision. Through multivariate regression analysis, readiness to use mobile learning can be described in terms of perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, personal innovativeness, self-management of learning, perceived device limitation, and availability. Class level, perceived ease of use, personal innovativeness, and self-management of learning explain intention to use mobile learning. Findings obtained from these results can provide guidance in the development and application of mobile learning systems.

PMID: 26200902 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Using the Technology: Introducing Point of View Video Glasses Into the Simulated Clinical Learning Environment.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
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Using the Technology: Introducing Point of View Video Glasses Into the Simulated Clinical Learning Environment.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):443-7; quiz E1

Authors: Metcalfe H, Jonas-Dwyer D, Saunders R, Dugmore H

Abstract
The introduction of learning technologies into educational settings continues to grow alongside the emergence of innovative technologies into the healthcare arena. The challenge for health professionals such as medical, nursing, and allied health practitioners is to develop an improved understanding of these technologies and how they may influence practice and contribute to healthcare. For nurse educators to remain contemporary, there is a need to not only embrace current technologies in teaching and learning but to also ensure that students are able to adapt to this changing pedagogy. One recent technological innovation is the use of wearable computing technology, consisting of video recording with the capability of playback analysis. The authors of this article discuss the introduction of the use of wearable Point of View video glasses by a cohort of nursing students in a simulated clinical learning laboratory. Of particular interest was the ease of use of the glasses, also termed the usability of this technology, which is central to its success. Students' reflections were analyzed together with suggestions for future use.

PMID: 26176638 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

CaseWorld: Authentic Case-Based Learning Simulating Healthcare Practice.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
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CaseWorld: Authentic Case-Based Learning Simulating Healthcare Practice.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):436-42

Authors: Tucker K, Parker S, Gillham D, Wright V, Cornell J

Abstract
Health educators in Australia are challenged by the need to provide clinically relevant education to large numbers of students across a wide range of specialties. This situation is compounded by changed student demographics, new technologies in both the workplace and university, and decreased access to clinical placement opportunities for students. This article describes an innovative response addressing nurse education priorities and implemented in the School of Nursing at Flinders University South Australia, involving the development of CaseWorld, a prototype virtual case-based learning environment. CaseWorld implementation was unique because large-scale innovation occurred as part of routine curriculum development. This was challenging as there was limited opportunity for prototype evaluation before student use, thus necessitating a flexible implementation process. The outcome was the development of scripted unfolding cases that provide students with low-fidelity simulation enhanced by multimedia. Students engage with cases based on real patient experiences, which are modified to protect confidentiality. These authentic cases provide the basis for the development of critical-thinking and decision-making skills as students problem solve issues and identify priorities for nursing care, explain the pathophysiology, and respond to simulated patient complaints. CaseWorld was modified in response to evaluation data from surveys and focus groups, and the revised version is discussed in terms of its implementation in nursing and planned use across multiple health sciences disciplines.

PMID: 26176635 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Leaders in Nursing Informatics Education and Research: The University of Utah Celebrates 25 Years.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-05-18 22:51
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Leaders in Nursing Informatics Education and Research: The University of Utah Celebrates 25 Years.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Sep;33(9):379-81

Authors: Cummins MR, Sward K, Guo JW

PMID: 26381830 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

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