nursing informatics

Perinatal and Neonatal Health Information Technology: Past, Present, and Future.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-07-18 15:31
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Perinatal and Neonatal Health Information Technology: Past, Present, and Future.

J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2016 Jul-Sep;30(3):209-13

Authors: McCartney PR, Drake EE

Abstract
The 3 decades of The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing history share the same 3 decades as the birth of the information age and health information technology (HIT). This article summarizes the history of HIT and the corresponding publication history of The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing. Health information technology content has evolved from being the "how-to operate" topic of a publication to being integrated within a nursing practice publication. The article concludes with current HIT challenges and implications for the future.

PMID: 27465451 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Actor-Network Theory as a sociotechnical lens to explore the relationship of nurses and technology in practice: methodological considerations for nursing research.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-07-18 15:31
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Actor-Network Theory as a sociotechnical lens to explore the relationship of nurses and technology in practice: methodological considerations for nursing research.

Nurs Inq. 2016 Jun;23(2):109-20

Authors: Booth RG, Andrusyszyn MA, Iwasiw C, Donelle L, Compeau D

Abstract
Actor-Network Theory is a research lens that has gained popularity in the nursing and health sciences domains. The perspective allows a researcher to describe the interaction of actors (both human and non-human) within networked sociomaterial contexts, including complex practice environments where nurses and health technology operate. This study will describe Actor-Network Theory and provide methodological considerations for researchers who are interested in using this sociotechnical lens within nursing and informatics-related research. Considerations related to technology conceptualization, levels of analysis, and sampling procedures in Actor-Network Theory based research are addressed. Finally, implications for future nursing research within complex environments are highlighted.

PMID: 26531190 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nurse Informaticians Report Low Satisfaction and Multi-level Concerns with Electronic Health Records: Results from an International Survey.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2017-07-14 12:29
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Nurse Informaticians Report Low Satisfaction and Multi-level Concerns with Electronic Health Records: Results from an International Survey.

AMIA Annu Symp Proc. 2016;2016:2016-2025

Authors: Topaz M, Ronquillo C, Peltonen LM, Pruinelli L, Sarmiento RF, Badger MK, Ali S, Lewis A, Georgsson M, Jeon E, Tayaben JL, Kuo CH, Islam T, Sommer J, Jung H, Eler GJ, Alhuwail D, Lee YL

Abstract
This study presents a qualitative content analysis of nurses' satisfaction and issues with current electronic health record (EHR) systems, as reflected in one of the largest international surveys of nursing informatics. Study participants from 45 countries (n=469) ranked their satisfaction with the current state of nursing functionality in EHRs as relatively low. Two-thirds of the participants (n=283) provided disconcerting comments when explaining their low satisfaction rankings. More than one half of the comments identified issues at the system level (e.g., poor system usability; non-integrated systems and poor interoperability; lack of standards; and limited functionality/missing components), followed by user-task issues (e.g., failure of systems to meet nursing clinical needs; non nursing-specific systems) and environment issues (e.g., low prevalence of EHRs; lack of user training). The study results call for the attention of international stakeholders (educators, managers, policy makers) to improve the current issues with EHRs from a nursing perspective.

PMID: 28269961 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing Informatics Certification Worldwide: History, Pathway, Roles, and Motivation.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2017-06-30 21:21
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Nursing Informatics Certification Worldwide: History, Pathway, Roles, and Motivation.

Yearb Med Inform. 2016 Nov 10;(1):264-271

Authors: Cummins MR, Gundlapalli AV, Gundlapalli AV, Murray P, Park HA, Lehmann CU

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Official recognition and certification for informatics professionals are essential aspects of workforce development.
OBJECTIVE: To describe the history, pathways, and nuances of certification in nursing informatics across the globe; compare and contrast those with board certification in clinical informatics for physicians.
METHODS: (1) A review of the representative literature on informatics certification and related competencies for nurses and physicians, and relevant websites for nursing informatics associations and societies worldwide; (2) similarities and differences between certification processes for nurses and physicians, and (3) perspectives on roles for nursing informatics professionals in healthcare Results: The literature search for 'nursing informatics certification' yielded few results in PubMed; Google Scholar yielded a large number of citations that extended to magazines and other non-peer reviewed sources. Worldwide, there are several nursing informatics associations, societies, and workgroups dedicated to nursing informatics associated with medical/health informatics societies. A formal certification program for nursing informatics appears to be available only in the United States. This certification was established in 1992, in concert with the formation and definition of nursing informatics as a specialty practice of nursing by the American Nurses Association. Although informatics is inherently interprofessional, certification pathways for nurses and physicians have developed separately, following long-standing professional structures, training, and pathways aligned with clinical licensure and direct patient care. There is substantial similarity with regard to the skills and competencies required for nurses and physicians to obtain informatics certification in their respective fields. Nurses may apply for and complete a certification examination if they have experience in the field, regardless of formal training. Increasing numbers of informatics nurses are pursuing certification.
CONCLUSIONS: The pathway to certification is clear and wellestablished for U.S. based informatics nurses. The motivation for obtaining and maintaining nursing informatics certification appears to be stronger for nurses who do not have an advanced informatics degree. The primary difference between nursing and physician certification pathways relates to the requirement of formal training and level of informatics practice. Nurse informatics certification requires no formal education or training and verifies knowledge and skill at a more basic level. Physician informatics certification validates informatics knowledge and skill at a more advanced level; currently this requires documentation of practice and experience in clinical informatics and in the future will require successful completion of an accredited two-year fellowship in clinical informatics. For the profession of nursing, a graduate degree in nursing or biomedical informatics validates specialty knowledge at a level more comparable to the physician certification. As the field of informatics and its professional organization structures mature, a common certification pathway may be appropriate. Nurses, physicians, and other healthcare professionals with informatics training and certification are needed to contribute their expertise in clinical operations, teaching, research, and executive leadership.

PMID: 27830261 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Curricular Path to Value: Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-05-30 15:08
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Curricular Path to Value: Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record.

J Nurs Educ. 2016 Dec 01;55(12):716-719

Authors: Sorensen J, Campbell L

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Regulatory mandates consistently focus on quality, safety, and improving patient care as better evidence surfaces. One of those mandates is the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) across all patient care settings. New graduate nurses must know how to access patient data and document and synthesize patient information accurately to plan safe, quality care and mitigate potential errors.
METHOD: In an undergraduate nursing program, the objectives were to provide faculty with simple teaching strategies that promoted ease of integrating an academic EHR (AEHR) across a curriculum, as well as to steadily increase students' use of an AEHR.
RESULTS: Faculty stressed an appreciation for having a supportive environment with an innovative way to educate nursing students. Students' feedback and course evaluations were positive, with students noting that they enjoyed learning in a different way.
CONCLUSION: Faculty should continue to share their innovative teaching strategies for AEHR integration. Further research should include measurable outcomes of integrating an AEHR throughout a curriculum. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(12):716-719.].

PMID: 27893909 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing Interventions: Need for Clarity.

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Nursing Interventions: Need for Clarity.

J Nurs Educ. 2016 Dec 01;55(12):667-668

Authors: Reising DL

PMID: 27893900 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

CE: Original Research: Creating an Evidence-Based Progression for Clinical Advancement Programs.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2017-05-17 12:03
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CE: Original Research: Creating an Evidence-Based Progression for Clinical Advancement Programs.

Am J Nurs. 2017 May;117(5):22-35

Authors: Burke KG, Johnson T, Sites C, Barnsteiner J

Abstract
: Background: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project have identified six nursing competencies and supported their integration into undergraduate and graduate nursing curricula nationwide. But integration of those competencies into clinical practice has been limited, and evidence for the progression of competency proficiency within clinical advancement programs is scant. Using an evidence-based approach and building on the competencies identified by the IOM and QSEN, a team of experts at an academic health system developed eight competency domains and 186 related knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) for professional nursing practice.
PURPOSE: The aim of our study was to validate the eight identified competencies and 186 related KSAs and determine their developmental progression within a clinical advancement program.
METHODS: Using the Delphi technique, nursing leadership validated the newly identified competency domains and KSAs as essential to practice. Clinical experts from 13 Magnet-designated hospitals with clinical advancement programs then participated in Delphi rounds aimed at reaching consensus on the developmental progression of the 186 KSAs through four levels of clinical advancement.
RESULTS: Two Delphi rounds resulted in consensus by the expert participants. All eight competency domains were determined to be essential at all four levels of clinical practice. At the novice level of practice, the experts identified a greater number of KSAs in the domains of safety and patient- and family-centered care. At more advanced practice levels, the experts identified a greater number of KSAs in the domains of professionalism, teamwork, technology and informatics, and continuous quality improvement.
CONCLUSION: Incorporating the eight competency domains and the 186 KSAs into a framework for clinical advancement programs will likely result in more clearly defined role expectations; enhance accountability; and elevate and promote nursing practice, thereby improving clinical outcomes and quality of care. With their emphasis on quality and safety, the eight competency domains also offer a framework for enhancing position descriptions, performance evaluations, clinical recognition, initial and ongoing competency assessment programs, and orientation and residency programs.

PMID: 28410247 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Evaluation of the functional performance and technical quality of an Electronic Documentation System of the Nursing Process.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2017-05-04 17:57
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Evaluation of the functional performance and technical quality of an Electronic Documentation System of the Nursing Process.

Rev Lat Am Enfermagem. 2015 Feb-Apr;23(2):242-9

Authors: de Oliveira NB, Peres HH

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the functional performance and the technical quality of the Electronic Documentation System of the Nursing Process of the Teaching Hospital of the University of São Paulo.
METHOD: exploratory-descriptive study. The Quality Model of regulatory standard 25010 and the Evaluation Process defined under regulatory standard 25040, both of the International Organization for Standardization/International Electrotechnical Commission. The quality characteristics evaluated were: functional suitability, reliability, usability, performance efficiency, compatibility, security, maintainability and portability. The sample was made up of 37 evaluators.
RESULTS: in the evaluation of the specialists in information technology, only the characteristic of usability obtained a rate of positive responses of less than 70%. For the nurse lecturers, all the quality characteristics obtained a rate of positive responses of over 70%. The staff nurses of the medical and surgical clinics with experience in using the system) and staff nurses from other units of the hospital and from other health institutions (without experience in using the system) obtained rates of positive responses of more than 70% referent to the functional suitability, usability, and security. However, performance efficiency, reliability and compatibility all obtained rates below the parameter established.
CONCLUSION: the software achieved rates of positive responses of over 70% for the majority of the quality characteristics evaluated.

PMID: 26039294 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Towards an International Framework for Recommendations of Core Competencies in Nursing and Inter-Professional Informatics: The TIGER Competency Synthesis Project.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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Towards an International Framework for Recommendations of Core Competencies in Nursing and Inter-Professional Informatics: The TIGER Competency Synthesis Project.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;228:655-9

Authors: Hübner U, Shaw T, Thye J, Egbert N, Marin H, Ball M

Abstract
Informatics competencies of the health care workforce must meet the requirements of inter-professional process and outcome oriented provision of care. In order to help nursing education transform accordingly, the TIGER Initiative deployed an international survey, with participation from 21 countries, to evaluate and prioritise a broad list of core competencies for nurses in five domains: 1) nursing management, 2) information technology (IT) management in nursing, 3) interprofessional coordination of care, 4) quality management, and 5) clinical nursing. Informatics core competencies were found highly important for all domains. In addition, this project compiled eight national cases studies from Austria, Finland, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, the Philippines, Portugal, and Switzerland that reflected the country specific perspective. These findings will lead us to an international framework of informatics recommendations.

PMID: 27577466 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

A Web-Based Database for Nurse Led Outreach Teams (NLOT) in Toronto.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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A Web-Based Database for Nurse Led Outreach Teams (NLOT) in Toronto.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;228:237-41

Authors: Li S, Kuo MH, Ryan D

Abstract
A web-based system can provide access to real-time data and information. Healthcare is moving towards digitizing patients' medical information and securely exchanging it through web-based systems. In one of Ontario's health regions, Nurse Led Outreach Teams (NLOT) provide emergency mobile nursing services to help reduce unnecessary transfers from long-term care homes to emergency departments. Currently the NLOT team uses a Microsoft Access database to keep track of the health information on the residents that they serve. The Access database lacks scalability, portability, and interoperability. The objective of this study is the development of a web-based database using Oracle Application Express that is easily accessible from mobile devices. The web-based database will allow NLOT nurses to enter and access resident information anytime and from anywhere.

PMID: 27577379 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Social Media Training for Professional Identity Development in Undergraduate Nurses.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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Social Media Training for Professional Identity Development in Undergraduate Nurses.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:344-8

Authors: Mather C, Cummings E, Nichols L

Abstract
The growth of social media use has led to tension affecting the perception of professionalism of nurses in healthcare environments. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore first and final year undergraduate student use of social media to understand how it was utilised by them during their course. Descriptive statistical analysis was undertaken to compare differences between first and final year student use. No difference indicated there was a lack of development in the use of social media, particularly concerning in relation to expanding their professional networks. There is a need for the curriculum to include opportunities to teach student nurses methods to ensure the appropriate and safe use of social media. Overt teaching and modelling of desired behaviour to guide and support the use of social media to positively promote professional identity formation, which is essential for work-readiness at graduation, is necessary.

PMID: 27332219 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Educational Requirements for Mobile Applications in Nursing: Applying the User-Task-Context Matrix to Identify User Classes and Contexts of Use.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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Educational Requirements for Mobile Applications in Nursing: Applying the User-Task-Context Matrix to Identify User Classes and Contexts of Use.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:339-43

Authors: Borycki EM, Kushniruk AW, Turner P, Kaipio J, Cummings E

Abstract
Mobile applications are increasingly being deployed in healthcare and nurses are expected to use them during their education, practice and during training of patients. In this paper we describe how an approach to modelling user needs known as the user-task-context matrix has been applied to help guide in developing requirements for new mobile applications as well as for selecting applications to be used in different aspects of nursing and patient education. The approach involves first brainstorming the different classes of users of an application and then specifying possible tasks the application can be used for. In addition, different contexts of use of the application are then specified. Application of the method is described for improving understanding of user needs in both design and procurement of healthcare apps related to nursing education.

PMID: 27332218 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Using Co-Design with Nursing Students to Create Educational Apps for Clinical Training.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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Using Co-Design with Nursing Students to Create Educational Apps for Clinical Training.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:334-8

Authors: O'Connor S, Andrews T

Abstract
Mobile technology is being trialed in nursing education to support students in clinical practice, as it can provide instant access to high quality educational material at the point of care. However, most educational mobile apps are generic, off-the-shelf applications that do not take into consideration the unique needs of nursing students, who can require personalised software solutions. This study adapted a socio-cognitive engineering approach and through a series of focus groups with final year nursing students explored the co-design process and gained their input on the design and functionality of a clinical skills based educational app. Results showed students required an uncluttered interface that was fast to navigate and easy to use in busy clinical environments. They also requested simple visual descriptions of key clinical skills and equipment to enable them to quickly refresh their memory so they could perform the skill in practice.

PMID: 27332217 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Embedding Nursing Informatics Education into an Australian Undergraduate Nursing Degree.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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Embedding Nursing Informatics Education into an Australian Undergraduate Nursing Degree.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:329-33

Authors: Cummings E, Shin EH, Mather C, Hovenga E

Abstract
Alongside the rapid rise in the adoption of electronic health records and the use of technology to support nursing processes, there is a requirement for nursing students, new graduate nurses, and nursing educators to embrace nursing informatics. Whilst nursing informatics has been taught at post graduate levels for many years, the integration of it into undergraduate studies for entry level nurses has been slow. This is made more complex by the lack of explicit nursing informatics competencies in many countries. Australia has now mandated the inclusion of nursing informatics into all undergraduate nursing curricula but there continues to be an absence of a relevant set of agreed nursing competencies. There is a resulting lack of consistency in nursing curricula content nationally. This paper describes the process used by one Australian university to integrate nursing informatics throughout the undergraduate nursing degree curriculum to ensure entry level nurses have a basic level of skills in the use of informatics.

PMID: 27332216 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Changing Educational Paths in an Informatics Course According to the Needs and Expectations of Nursing Degree Students.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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Changing Educational Paths in an Informatics Course According to the Needs and Expectations of Nursing Degree Students.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:324-8

Authors: González ZA, Schachner MB, Tattone MA, Benítez SE

Abstract
Informatics education in the nursing career varies in each curriculum, and directly impact in training and future development of nurses in the professional field. While the proposed curriculum is based on essential minimum content for professional training, it was necessary to update it according to current technological development, considering the different profiles of students and practice settings, labor and academia. The pedagogical proposals were redesigned in two informatics courses of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) at Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires. We adapted the curricula tailored on prior knowledge, educational path and needs of the students identified and made explicit by them at the beginning of the courses. At the end of the courses, the students surveyed said that the changes were appropriate.

PMID: 27332215 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Development and Evaluation for Active Learning Instructional Design of Epidemiology in Nursing Informatics Field.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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Development and Evaluation for Active Learning Instructional Design of Epidemiology in Nursing Informatics Field.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:319-23

Authors: Majima Y

Abstract
Nursing education classes are classifiable into three types: lectures, classroom practice, and clinical practice. In this study, we implemented a class that incorporated elements of active learning, including clickers, minutes papers, quizzes, and group work and presentation, in the subject of "epidemiology", which is often positioned in the field of nursing informatics and which is usually taught in conventional knowledge-transmission style lectures, to help students understand knowledge and achieve seven class goals. Results revealed that the average scores of the class achievement (five levels of evaluation) were 3.6-3.9, which was good overall. The highest average score of the evaluation of teaching materials by students (five levels of evaluation) was 4.6 for quizzes, followed by 4.2 for announcement of test statistics, 4.1 for clickers, and 4.0 for news presentation related to epidemiology. We regard these as useful tools for students to increase their motivation. One problem with the class was that it took time to organize the class: creation of tests, class preparation and marking, such as things to be returned and distribution of clickers, and writing comments on small papers.

PMID: 27332214 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Technology Readiness of Early Career Nurse Trainees: Utilization of the Technology Readiness Index (TRI).

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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Technology Readiness of Early Career Nurse Trainees: Utilization of the Technology Readiness Index (TRI).

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:314-8

Authors: Odlum M

Abstract
Health Information Technology (HIT) adoption by clinicians, including nurses, will lead to reduction in healthcare costs and clinical errors and improve health outcomes. Understanding the importance of technology adoption, the current study utilized the Technology Readiness Index to explore technology perceptions of nursing students. Our analysis identifies factors that may influence perceptions of technology, including decreased optimism for students with clinical experience and increased discomfort of US born students. Our study provides insight to inform training programs to further meet the increasing demands of skilled nursing staff.

PMID: 27332213 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Preparing the Next Generation of Advanced Practice Nurses for Connected Care.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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Preparing the Next Generation of Advanced Practice Nurses for Connected Care.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:307-13

Authors: Skiba DJ, Barton AJ, Estes K, Gilliam E, Knapfel S, Lee C, Moore G, Trinkley K

Abstract
The health care delivery system in the United States is transforming at a rapid pace. Several trends, including the emergence of a Connected Health care system, will require advanced nurse practitioners to have new knowledge, skills and competencies to practice in the future. This paper describes the redesign of coursework and the development of a Connected Care Framework to guide the learning needs of nurse practitioners. A Connected Care Quotient consisting of ten relevant questions and learning activities will serve as a guide for the future development of competencies for advanced practice nurses.

PMID: 27332212 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Integrating Informatics Content into the Nursing Curriculum.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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Integrating Informatics Content into the Nursing Curriculum.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:302-6

Authors: Weiner E, Trangenstein P, Gordon J, McNew R

Abstract
Contemporary nursing curricula require that nursing informatics content be integrated across the various levels of the programs that are offered. Many such programs face national accreditation requirements that typically relate more to technology than to informatics. International standards vary in these requirements. How can nursing programs meet these vastly different criteria yet continue to level informatics content that follows quality curriculum standards? This presentation describes one approach across programs that considers already developed competencies in nursing informatics while also taking into consideration the various roles that the graduates will have to assume in advanced practice nursing roles. Levels discussed include the baccalaureate, master's, doctorate in nursing practice, and the traditional Doctor of Philosophy degrees.

PMID: 27332211 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Information Literacy in a Digital Era: Understanding the Impact of Mobile Information for Undergraduate Nursing Students.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-04-25 17:54
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Information Literacy in a Digital Era: Understanding the Impact of Mobile Information for Undergraduate Nursing Students.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;225:297-301

Authors: Doyle GJ, Furlong KE, Secco L

Abstract
Recent entry-to-practice nursing informatics competencies for Registered Nurses in Canada mean nurse educators need educational strategies to promote student competency within the rapidly evolving informatics field. A collaborative research team from three Canadian nursing programs completed a mixed method survey to describe how nursing students used mobile nursing information support and the extent of this support for learning. The Mobile Information Support Evaluation Tool (MISET) assessed Usefulness/Helpfulness, Information Literacy Support, and Use of Evidence-Based Sources. The quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed to describe students' perspectives and the ways they used mobile resources in learning situations. Findings suggest nursing students mainly accessed mobile resources to support clinical learning, and specifically for task-oriented information such as drug medication or patient conditions/diagnoses. Researchers recommend a paradigm shift whereby educators emphasize information literacy in a way that supports evidence-based quality care.

PMID: 27332210 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

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