nursing informatics

Nursing Needs Big Data and Big Data Needs Nursing.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-04-27 15:39
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Nursing Needs Big Data and Big Data Needs Nursing.

J Nurs Scholarsh. 2015 Sep;47(5):477-84

Authors: Brennan PF, Bakken S

Abstract
PURPOSE: Contemporary big data initiatives in health care will benefit from greater integration with nursing science and nursing practice; in turn, nursing science and nursing practice has much to gain from the data science initiatives. Big data arises secondary to scholarly inquiry (e.g., -omics) and everyday observations like cardiac flow sensors or Twitter feeds. Data science methods that are emerging ensure that these data be leveraged to improve patient care.
ORGANIZING CONSTRUCT: Big data encompasses data that exceed human comprehension, that exist at a volume unmanageable by standard computer systems, that arrive at a velocity not under the control of the investigator and possess a level of imprecision not found in traditional inquiry. Data science methods are emerging to manage and gain insights from big data.
METHODS: The primary methods included investigation of emerging federal big data initiatives, and exploration of exemplars from nursing informatics research to benchmark where nursing is already poised to participate in the big data revolution. We provide observations and reflections on experiences in the emerging big data initiatives.
CONCLUSIONS: Existing approaches to large data set analysis provide a necessary but not sufficient foundation for nursing to participate in the big data revolution. Nursing's Social Policy Statement guides a principled, ethical perspective on big data and data science. There are implications for basic and advanced practice clinical nurses in practice, for the nurse scientist who collaborates with data scientists, and for the nurse data scientist.
CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Big data and data science has the potential to provide greater richness in understanding patient phenomena and in tailoring interventional strategies that are personalized to the patient.

PMID: 26287646 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing undergraduates' technical competence in informatics.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sun, 2016-04-24 15:25
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Nursing undergraduates' technical competence in informatics.

Rev Esc Enferm USP. 2011 Dec;45 Spec No:1595-9

Authors: Cruz NS, Soares DK, Bernardes A, Gabriel CS, Pereira MC, Evora YD

Abstract
Nurses in the information age need to build their knowledge and abilities in order to be competent in this area. The objective of this study was to verify the knowledge of nursing freshmen (1st semester) and seniors (8th semester) registered in 2008 and 2007, respectively, regarding their ability to use informatics resources. This is a non-experimental, descriptive, exploratory survey. Data collection was performed using a questionnaire based on a set of competences in informatics. The results revealed a low rate of informatics knowledge among the freshmen. However, regarding the applications that students had the most difficulty to operate, between the two periods, seniors had the worst performance, which shows it is necessary to include computer classes in the preparation of these new professional, in order to prepare them for the work market.

PMID: 22282067 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Developing Online Communities with LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) - the IMIA OSNI and CHIRAD Experiences.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sat, 2016-04-23 15:24
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Developing Online Communities with LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) - the IMIA OSNI and CHIRAD Experiences.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2005;116:361-6

Authors: Murray PJ, Oyri K

Abstract
Many health informatics organisations do not seem to use, on a practical basis, for the benefit of their activities and interaction with their members, the very technologies that they often promote for use within healthcare environments. In particular, many organisations seem to be slow to take up the benefits of interactive web technologies. This paper presents an introduction to some of the many free/libre and open source (FLOSS) applications currently available and using the LAMP - Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP architecture - as a way of cheaply deploying reliable, scalable, and secure web applications. The experience of moving to applications using LAMP architecture, in particular that of the Open Source Nursing Informatics (OSNI) Working Group of the Special Interest Group in Nursing Informatics of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA-NI), in using PostNuke, a FLOSS Content Management System (CMS) illustrates many of the benefits of such applications. The experiences of the authors in installing and maintaining a large number of websites using FLOSS CMS to develop dynamic, interactive websites that facilitate real engagement with the members of IMIA-NI OSNI, the IMIA Open Source Working Group, and the Centre for Health Informatics Research and Development (CHIRAD), as well as other organisations, is used as the basis for discussing the potential benefits that could be realised by others within the health informatics community.

PMID: 16160284 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

You mean the Twitter nurse?

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2016-04-22 15:23
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You mean the Twitter nurse?

Nurs Times. 2016 Feb 10-23;112(6-7):26

Authors: Middleton J

PMID: 27017654 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Teaching and Learning About Big Data: Start Small.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2016-04-22 15:23
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Teaching and Learning About Big Data: Start Small.

Nurse Educ. 2015 Nov-Dec;40(6):297

Authors: Jackson A

PMID: 26479357 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

A robust social and professional connection between master educator and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) student instructor: Virtual mentoring and preceptorship via distance education.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2016-04-22 15:23
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A robust social and professional connection between master educator and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) student instructor: Virtual mentoring and preceptorship via distance education.

Nurse Educ Today. 2015 May;35(5):696-9

Authors: Rand ML, Pajarillo EJ

PMID: 25721410 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing Clinical Documentation System Structured on NANDA-I, NOC, and NIC Classification Systems.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-04-20 15:14
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Nursing Clinical Documentation System Structured on NANDA-I, NOC, and NIC Classification Systems.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;216:943

Authors: Peres HH, de Almeida Lopes M da Cruz D, Tellez M, de Cassia Gengo e Silva R, dos S Diogo RC, Ortiz DC, Ortiz DR

Abstract
Information is a key feature that health professionals need to exercise their profession with efficiency and quality. This study aims to present the experience of the usage of an electronic system for clinical documentation in nursing in a university hospital. It is a methodological research of technology production. The system was developed in four phases: Conception, Elaboration, Construction, and Transition, and was named Electronic Documentation System of the University of São Paulo Nursing Process (PROCEnf-USP™). The knowledge base of PROCEnf-USP™ was organized in hierarchy of domains and classes, according to NNN linkages.

PMID: 26262245 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Integrating emerging areas of nursing science into PhD programs.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2016-04-19 15:10
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Integrating emerging areas of nursing science into PhD programs.

Nurs Outlook. 2015 Jul-Aug;63(4):408-16

Authors: Henly SJ, McCarthy DO, Wyman JF, Stone PW, Redeker NS, McCarthy AM, Alt-White AC, Dunbar-Jacob J, Titler MG, Moore SM, Heitkemper MM, Conley YP

Abstract
The Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science aims to "facilitate and recognize life-long nursing science career development" as an important part of its mission. In light of fast-paced advances in science and technology that are inspiring new questions and methods of investigation in the health sciences, the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science convened the Idea Festival for Nursing Science Education and appointed the Idea Festival Advisory Committee to stimulate dialogue about linking PhD education with a renewed vision for preparation of the next generation of nursing scientists. Building on the 2010 American Association of Colleges of Nursing Position Statement "The Research-Focused Doctoral Program in Nursing: Pathways to Excellence," Idea Festival Advisory Committee members focused on emerging areas of science and technology that impact the ability of research-focused doctoral programs to prepare graduates for competitive and sustained programs of nursing research using scientific advances in emerging areas of science and technology. The purpose of this article is to describe the educational and scientific contexts for the Idea Festival, which will serve as the foundation for recommendations for incorporating emerging areas of science and technology into research-focused doctoral programs in nursing.

PMID: 26187080 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Emerging areas of science: Recommendations for Nursing Science Education from the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science Idea Festival.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2016-04-19 15:10
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Emerging areas of science: Recommendations for Nursing Science Education from the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science Idea Festival.

Nurs Outlook. 2015 Jul-Aug;63(4):398-407

Authors: Henly SJ, McCarthy DO, Wyman JF, Heitkemper MM, Redeker NS, Titler MG, McCarthy AM, Stone PW, Moore SM, Alt-White AC, Conley YP, Dunbar-Jacob J

Abstract
The Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science aims to "facilitate and recognize life-long nursing science career development" as an important part of its mission. In light of fast-paced advances in science and technology that are inspiring new questions and methods of investigation in the health sciences, the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science convened the Idea Festival for Nursing Science Education and appointed the Idea Festival Advisory Committee (IFAC) to stimulate dialogue about linking PhD education with a renewed vision for preparation of the next generation of nursing scientists. Building on the 2005 National Research Council report Advancing The Nation's Health Needs and the 2010 American Association of Colleges of Nursing Position Statement on the Research-Focused Doctorate Pathways to Excellence, the IFAC specifically addressed the capacity of PhD programs to prepare nursing scientists to conduct cutting-edge research in the following key emerging and priority areas of health sciences research: omics and the microbiome; health behavior, behavior change, and biobehavioral science; patient-reported outcomes; big data, e-science, and informatics; quantitative sciences; translation science; and health economics. The purpose of this article is to (a) describe IFAC activities, (b) summarize 2014 discussions hosted as part of the Idea Festival, and (c) present IFAC recommendations for incorporating these emerging areas of science and technology into research-focused doctoral programs committed to preparing graduates for lifelong, competitive careers in nursing science. The recommendations address clearer articulation of program focus areas; inclusion of foundational knowledge in emerging areas of science in core courses on nursing science and research methods; faculty composition; prerequisite student knowledge and skills; and in-depth, interdisciplinary training in supporting area of science content and methods.

PMID: 26187079 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Middle Managers' Experiences and Role in Implementing an Interactive Tailored Patient Assessment eHealth Intervention in Clinical Practice.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2016-04-14 14:57
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Middle Managers' Experiences and Role in Implementing an Interactive Tailored Patient Assessment eHealth Intervention in Clinical Practice.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Jun;33(6):249-57

Authors: Varsi C, Ekstedt M, Gammon D, Børøsund E, Ruland CM

Abstract
The role of nurse and physician managers is considered crucial for implementing eHealth interventions in clinical practice, but few studies have explored this. The aim of the current study was to examine the perceptions of nurse and physician managers regarding facilitators, barriers, management role, responsibility, and action taken in the implementation of an eHealth intervention called Choice into clinical practice. Individual qualitative interviews were conducted with six nurses and three physicians in management positions at five hospital units. The findings revealed that nurse managers reported conscientiously supporting the implementation, but workloads prevented them from participating in the process as closely as they wanted. Physician managers reported less contribution. The implementation process was influenced by facilitating factors such as perceptions of benefits from Choice and use of implementation strategies, along with barriers such as physician resistance, contextual factors and difficulties for front-line providers in learning a new way of communicating with the patients. The findings suggest that role descriptions for both nurse and physician managers should include implementation knowledge and implementation skills. Managers could benefit from an implementation toolkit. Implementation management should be included in management education for healthcare managers to prepare them for the constant need for implementation and improvement in clinical practice.

PMID: 25988851 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Methodological Challenges in Examining the Impact of Healthcare Predictive Analytics on Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2016-04-14 14:57
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Methodological Challenges in Examining the Impact of Healthcare Predictive Analytics on Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Jun;33(6):258-64

Authors: Jeffery AD

Abstract
The expansion of real-time analytic abilities within current electronic health records has led to innovations in predictive modeling and clinical decision support systems. However, the ability of these systems to influence patient outcomes is currently unknown. Even though nurses are the largest profession within the healthcare workforce, little research has been performed to explore the impact of clinical decision support on their decisions and the patient outcomes associated with them. A scoping literature review explored the impact clinical decision support systems containing healthcare predictive analytics have on four nursing-sensitive patient outcomes (pressure ulcers, failure to rescue, falls, and infections). While many articles discussed variable selection and predictive model development/validation, only four articles examined the impact on patient outcomes. The novelty of predictive analytics and the inherent methodological challenges in studying clinical decision support impact are likely responsible for this paucity of literature. Major methodological challenges include (1) multilevel nature of intervention, (2) treatment fidelity, and (3) adequacy of clinicians' subsequent behavior. There is currently insufficient evidence to demonstrate efficacy of healthcare predictive analytics-enhanced clinical decision support systems on nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. Innovative research methods and a greater emphasis on studying this phenomenon are needed.

PMID: 25899442 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The Impact of National Cultural Differences on Nurses' Acceptance of Hospital Information Systems.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2016-04-14 14:57
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The Impact of National Cultural Differences on Nurses' Acceptance of Hospital Information Systems.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Jun;33(6):265-72

Authors: Lin HC

Abstract
This study aims to explore the influence of national cultural differences on nurses' perceptions of their acceptance of hospital information systems. This study uses the perspective of Technology Acceptance Model; national cultural differences in terms of masculinity/femininity, individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance are incorporated into the Technology Acceptance Model as moderators, whereas time orientation is a control variable on hospital information system acceptance. A quantitative research design was used in this study; 261 participants, US and Taiwan RNs, all had hospital information system experience. Data were collected from November 2013 to February 2014 and analyzed using a t test to compare the coefficients for each moderator. The results show that individualism/collectivism, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance all exhibit significant difference on hospital information system acceptance; however, both masculinity/femininity and time orientation factors did not show significance. This study verifies that national cultural differences have significant influence on nurses' behavioral intention to use hospital information systems. Therefore, hospital information system providers should emphasize the way in which to integrate different technological functions to meet the needs of nurses from various cultural backgrounds.

PMID: 25899441 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

e-Patients Perceptions of Using Personal Health Records for Self-management Support of Chronic Illness.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2016-04-14 14:57
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e-Patients Perceptions of Using Personal Health Records for Self-management Support of Chronic Illness.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Jun;33(6):229-37

Authors: Gee PM, Paterniti DA, Ward D, Soederberg Miller LM

Abstract
Chronic illness self-management is largely moving from healthcare professionals and into the hands of the patient. One tool that has been promoted to facilitate self-management support of chronic illness by policymakers, health advocates, providers, and consumers is the personal health record. Little is known about how consumers effectively use personal health records for self-management support and for productive patient-provider interactions. The purpose of this study was to learn from chronically ill engaged, experienced, and educated (e-patient) adults how and why they use personal health records for self-management support and productive patient-provider interactions. Eighteen purposively selected consumers were interviewed in two communities. Qualitative description methods were used, and we used a grounded theory approach to analyzing interview data, which was digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. We identified four major thematic categories that capture the perceptions of the chronically ill using personal health records: (1) patient engagement and health self-management, (2) access to and control over personal health data, (3) promotion of productive communication, and (4) opportunities for training and education. Knowledge gained from the e-patient personal health record users suggest that making improvements to the portal system and providing education to consumers and providers will increase the utility among the experienced users and encourage new users to embrace adoption and use.

PMID: 25899440 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Clinical Decision Support and Perioperative Peripheral Nerve Injury: A Quality Improvement Project.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2016-04-14 14:57
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Clinical Decision Support and Perioperative Peripheral Nerve Injury: A Quality Improvement Project.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Jun;33(6):238-48; quiz E1

Authors: Bouyer-Ferullo S, Androwich IM, Dykes PC

Abstract
Decision support at the point of care has been demonstrated to be an effective tool in providing a safe environment and improving patient outcomes. The operating room is typically an area where advanced technology is introduced to nurses on a regular basis. This quality improvement project focused on preventing a peripheral nerve injury, which is an example of a postoperative adverse event that is considered preventable. Injury of a peripheral nerve is the result of compression, hyperextension, flexion, or ischemia surrounding the nerve. The goals for this project were to improve the knowledge of peripheral nerve injury of the operating room nurses, design and implement a peripheral nerve injury assessment screen that could provide decision support within the operating room record, improve the nursing documentation of peripheral nerve injury interventions, and (long term) decrease the incidence of peripheral nerve injury. A decision support screen within the operating room record was designed to supplement the operating room nurse's risk assessment for peripheral nerve injury. The components of this project involved a preliminary and postproject surveys on peripheral nerve injury knowledge, an educational presentation, and a retrospective random review of nursing documentation in the operating room electronic health records. Project results demonstrated a significant increase in nursing documentation of peripheral nerve injury interventions (63%-92%) and a positive attitude toward their exposure to basic decision support (P = .046). Recommendations for future studies and establishing a standardized coding system for peripheral nerve injury identification were identified.

PMID: 25851559 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

A Nursing Intelligence System to Support Secondary Use of Nursing Routine Data.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sat, 2016-04-09 14:48
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A Nursing Intelligence System to Support Secondary Use of Nursing Routine Data.

Appl Clin Inform. 2015;6(2):418-28

Authors: Hackl WO, Rauchegger F, Ammenwerth E

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Nursing care is facing exponential growth of information from nursing documentation. This amount of electronically available data collected routinely opens up new opportunities for secondary use.
OBJECTIVES: To present a case study of a nursing intelligence system for reusing routinely collected nursing documentation data for multiple purposes, including quality management of nursing care.
METHODS: The SPIRIT framework for systematically planning the reuse of clinical routine data was leveraged to design a nursing intelligence system which then was implemented using open source tools in a large university hospital group following the spiral model of software engineering.
RESULTS: The nursing intelligence system is in routine use now and updated regularly, and includes over 40 million data sets. It allows the outcome and quality analysis of data related to the nursing process.
CONCLUSIONS: Following a systematic approach for planning and designing a solution for reusing routine care data appeared to be successful. The resulting nursing intelligence system is useful in practice now, but remains malleable for future changes.

PMID: 26171085 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Laying the Groundwork for NCLEX Success: An Exploration of Adaptive Quizzing as an Examination Preparation Method.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2016-04-08 17:47
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Laying the Groundwork for NCLEX Success: An Exploration of Adaptive Quizzing as an Examination Preparation Method.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 May;33(5):208-15

Authors: Cox-Davenport RA, Phelan JC

Abstract
First-time NCLEX-RN pass rates are an important indicator of nursing school success and quality. Nursing schools use different methods to anticipate NCLEX outcomes and help prevent student failure and possible threat to accreditation. This study evaluated the impact of a shift in NCLEX preparation policy at a BSN program in the southeast United States. The policy shifted from the use of predictor score thresholds to determine graduation eligibility to a more proactive remediation strategy involving adaptive quizzing. A descriptive correlational design evaluated the impact of an adaptive quizzing system designed to give students ongoing active practice and feedback and explored the relationship between predictor examinations and NCLEX success. Data from student usage of the system as well as scores on predictor tests were collected for three student cohorts. Results revealed a positive correlation between adaptive quizzing system usage and content mastery. Two of the 69 students in the sample did not pass the NCLEX. With so few students failing the NCLEX, predictability of any course variables could not be determined. The power of predictor examinations to predict NCLEX failure could also not be supported. The most consistent factor among students, however, was their content mastery level within the adaptive quizzing system. Implications of these findings are discussed.

PMID: 25851560 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Development of a brief instrument to measure smartphone addiction among nursing students.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2016-04-08 17:47
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Development of a brief instrument to measure smartphone addiction among nursing students.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 May;33(5):216-24

Authors: Cho S, Lee E

Abstract
Interruptions and distractions due to smartphone use in healthcare settings pose potential risks to patient safety. Therefore, it is important to assess smartphone use at work, to encourage nursing students to review their relevant behaviors, and to recognize these potential risks. This study's aim was to develop a scale to measure smartphone addiction and test its validity and reliability. We investigated nursing students' experiences of distractions caused by smartphones in the clinical setting and their opinions about smartphone use policies. Smartphone addiction and the need for a scale to measure it were identified through a literature review and in-depth interviews with nursing students. This scale showed reliability and validity with exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. In testing the discriminant and convergent validity of the selected (18) items with four factors, the smartphone addiction model explained approximately 91% (goodness-of-fit index = 0.909) of the variance in the data. Pearson correlation coefficients among addiction level, distractions in the clinical setting, and attitude toward policies on smartphone use were calculated. Addiction level and attitude toward policies of smartphone use were negatively correlated. This study suggests that healthcare organizations in Korea should create practical guidelines and policies for the appropriate use of smartphones in clinical practice.

PMID: 25636040 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Clinical nurses lead the charge with EHR.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-04-06 17:42
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Clinical nurses lead the charge with EHR.

Nursing. 2015 Oct;45(10):25-6

Authors: Daly P

PMID: 26372237 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing education focus of nursing informatics research in 2013.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2016-04-05 17:38
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Nursing education focus of nursing informatics research in 2013.

Nurs Adm Q. 2014 Apr-Jun;38(2):189-91

Authors: Carrington JM, Tiase VL, Estrada N, Shea KD

Abstract
The Nursing Informatics Year in Review 2013 revealed an increase in publications associated with nursing education. Specifically, the articles addressed technology in nursing curricula, use of technology to teach nursing education, and use of technology to form collaborative relationships. In this article we present questions such as: how do these programs assist student nurses to transition to nurse providers where technology is infused into their work and workflow and what is the influence of the collaborative relationships with nurse educators, administrators, and informatics specialists increase patient safety and quality.

PMID: 24569767 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

E-learning & information communication technology (ICT) in nursing education: A review of the literature.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2016-03-29 14:20
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E-learning & information communication technology (ICT) in nursing education: A review of the literature.

Nurse Educ Today. 2014 Oct;34(10):1311-23

Authors: Button D, Harrington A, Belan I

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine primary research articles published between January 2001 and December 2012 that focused on the issues for students and educators involved with E-learning in preregistration nursing programs. The literature was systematically reviewed, critically appraised and thematically analyzed.
BACKGROUND: E-learning is arguably the most significant change to occur in nursing education since the move from hospital training to the tertiary sector. Differences in computer and information literacy for both students and educators influence the success of implementation of E-learning into current curricula.
DATA SOURCES: Online databases including CINAHL, MEDLINE, OVID, the ProQuest Central, PubMed, ERIC and Science Direct were used.
METHODS: The criteria used for selecting studies reviewed were: primary focus on electronic learning and issues faced by nursing students and/or nurse educators from undergraduate preregistration nursing programs; all articles had to be primary research studies, published in English in peer reviewed journals between January 2001 and December 2012.
RESULTS: Analysis of the 28 reviewed studies revealed the following three themes: issues relating to E-learning for students; use of information technologies; educator (faculty) issues involving pedagogy, workload and staff development in E-learning and associated technology.
CONCLUSION: The review highlighted that commencing preregistration nursing students required ongoing education and support surrounding nursing informatics. This support would enable students to progress and be equipped with the life-long learning skills required to provide safe evidence based care. The review also identified the increased time and skill demands placed on nurse educators to adapt their current education methodologies and teaching strategies to incorporate E-learning.

PMID: 23786869 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

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