nursing informatics

Advanced Nursing Process quality: Comparing the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) with the NANDA-International (NANDA-I) and Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC).

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Advanced Nursing Process quality: Comparing the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) with the NANDA-International (NANDA-I) and Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC).

J Clin Nurs. 2017 Feb;26(3-4):379-387

Authors: Rabelo-Silva ER, Dantas Cavalcanti AC, Ramos Goulart Caldas MC, Lucena AF, Almeida MA, Linch GF, da Silva MB, Müller-Staub M

Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To assess the quality of the advanced nursing process in nursing documentation in two hospitals.
BACKGROUND: Various standardised terminologies are employed by nurses worldwide, whether for teaching, research or patient care. These systems can improve the quality of nursing records, enable care continuity, consistency in written communication and enhance safety for patients and providers alike.
DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.
METHODS: A total of 138 records from two facilities (69 records from each facility) were analysed, one using the NANDA-International and Nursing Interventions Classification terminology (Centre 1) and one the International Classification for Nursing Practice (Centre 2), by means of the Quality of Diagnoses, Interventions, and Outcomes instrument. Quality of Diagnoses, Interventions, and Outcomes scores range from 0-58 points. Nursing records were dated 2012-2013 for Centre 1 and 2010-2011 for Centre 2.
RESULTS: Centre 1 had a Quality of Diagnoses, Interventions, and Outcomes score of 35·46 (±6·45), whereas Centre 2 had a Quality of Diagnoses, Interventions, and Outcomes score of 31·72 (±4·62) (p < 0·001). Centre 2 had higher scores in the 'Nursing Diagnoses as Process' dimension, whereas in the 'Nursing Diagnoses as Product', 'Nursing Interventions' and 'Nursing Outcomes' dimensions, Centre 1 exhibited superior performance; acceptable reliability values were obtained for both centres, except for the 'Nursing Interventions' domain in Centre 1 and the 'Nursing Diagnoses as Process' and 'Nursing Diagnoses as Product' domains in Centre 2.
CONCLUSION: The quality of nursing documentation was superior at Centre 1, although both facilities demonstrated moderate scores considering the maximum potential score of 58 points. Reliability analyses showed satisfactory results for both standardised terminologies.
RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nursing leaders should use a validated instrument to investigate the quality of nursing records after implementation of standardised terminologies.

PMID: 27192041 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The intersection of policy and informatics.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2017-03-23 13:38
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The intersection of policy and informatics.

Nurs Manage. 2016 Feb;47(2):12-3

Authors: Biddle S, Milstead JA

PMID: 26807830 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

NAQ's 40th Birthday Nursing: Predictions From the Past; Predictions for the Future, Parts I & II.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2017-03-16 22:35
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NAQ's 40th Birthday Nursing: Predictions From the Past; Predictions for the Future, Parts I & II.

Nurs Adm Q. 2016 Oct-Dec;40(4):283-91

Authors: McClure ML, Batcheller J

Abstract
The following two articles relate to Nursing's past and future, described through a series of predictions made by one of Nursing's great leaders Margaret L. McClure (Maggie McClure). It is reprinted from NAQ Fall 2000, Volume 25, Issue 1. The second article, by another great leader, Joyce Batcheller, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, is a follow up on those predictions, reflecting on Nursing today and tommorow.

PMID: 27584886 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Educating the nurses of 2025: Technology trends of the next decade.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-02-28 16:24
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Educating the nurses of 2025: Technology trends of the next decade.

Nurse Educ Pract. 2017 Jan;22:89-92

Authors: Risling T

Abstract
The pace of technological evolution in healthcare is advancing. In this article key technology trends are identified that are likely to influence nursing practice and education over the next decade. The complexity of curricular revision can create challenges in the face of rapid practice change. Nurse educators are encouraged to consider the role of electronic health records (EHRs), wearable technologies, big data and data analytics, and increased patient engagement as key areas for curriculum development. Student nurses, and those already in practice, should be offered ongoing educational opportunities to enhance a wide spectrum of professional informatics skills. The nurses of 2025 will most certainly inhabit a very different practice environment than what exists today and technology will be key in this transformation. Nurse educators must prepare now to lead these practitioners into the future.

PMID: 28049072 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Trends in Nursing Informatics Research and the Importance of the Nurse Administrator.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-02-28 16:24
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Trends in Nursing Informatics Research and the Importance of the Nurse Administrator.

Nurs Adm Q. 2016 Apr-Jun;40(2):184-5

Authors: Carrington JM

PMID: 26938191 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Strategies to Deliver Safe, Technology-Enhanced Care in Pediatric Settings.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2017-02-22 16:18
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Strategies to Deliver Safe, Technology-Enhanced Care in Pediatric Settings.

J Pediatr Nurs. 2016 Mar-Apr;31(2):224-7

Authors: Goldschmidt K

PMID: 26920636 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Feasibility of Using the Omaha System for Community-level Observations.

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Feasibility of Using the Omaha System for Community-level Observations.

Public Health Nurs. 2016 05;33(3):256-63

Authors: Kerr MJ, Flaten C, Honey ML, Gargantua-Aguila Sdel R, Nahcivan NO, Martin KS, Monsen KA

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a standardized language, the Omaha System, to capture community-level observations to facilitate population assessment and electronic information exchange. The objectives were: (1) to evaluate the feasibility of using the Omaha System at the community level to reflect community observations and (2) to describe preliminary results of community observations across international settings.
DESIGN AND SAMPLE: Descriptive. A dataset of 284 windshield surveys (community observations) completed by nursing students in five countries: Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Turkey, and the United States.
MEASURES: The Omaha System Problem Classification Scheme provided standardized terms for assessment of communities in an online checklist of 11 problems and their respective signs/symptoms.
RESULTS: Feasibility was demonstrated: students were able to describe community observations using standardized terminology from the Omaha System. Preliminary results describe variations in community signs and symptoms by location.
CONCLUSIONS: The Omaha System appears to be a useful tool for community-level observations and a promising strategy for electronic exchange of population health assessments.

PMID: 26429415 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The Explosion of Virtual Nursing Care.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-02-14 16:12
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The Explosion of Virtual Nursing Care.

J Nurs Adm. 2017 Feb;47(2):85-87

Authors: Boston-Fleischhauer C

Abstract
The call for care model innovation is clear, spearheaded by rising healthcare costs, changing payer expectations, overall fiscal and workforce shortages, and an increasingly comorbid patient population requiring significant, long-term support. As part of care model innovation, the leveraging of technology is key.

PMID: 28106680 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Refining a self-assessment of informatics competency scale using Mokken scaling analysis.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2017-02-09 16:10
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Refining a self-assessment of informatics competency scale using Mokken scaling analysis.

J Interprof Care. 2015;29(6):579-86

Authors: Yoon S, Shaffer JA, Bakken S

Abstract
Healthcare environments are increasingly implementing health information technology (HIT) and those from various professions must be competent to use HIT in meaningful ways. In addition, HIT has been shown to enable interprofessional approaches to health care. The purpose of this article is to describe the refinement of the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale (SANICS) using analytic techniques based upon item response theory (IRT) and discuss its relevance to interprofessional education and practice. In a sample of 604 nursing students, the 93-item version of SANICS was examined using non-parametric IRT. The iterative modeling procedure included 31 steps comprising: (1) assessing scalability, (2) assessing monotonicity, (3) assessing invariant item ordering, and (4) expert input. SANICS was reduced to an 18-item hierarchical scale with excellent reliability. Fundamental skills for team functioning and shared decision making among team members (e.g. "using monitoring systems appropriately," "describing general systems to support clinical care") had the highest level of difficulty, and "demonstrating basic technology skills" had the lowest difficulty level. Most items reflect informatics competencies relevant to all health professionals. Further, the approaches can be applied to construct a new hierarchical scale or refine an existing scale related to informatics attitudes or competencies for various health professions.

PMID: 26652630 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing languages as an international communication vehicle for nurses.

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Nursing languages as an international communication vehicle for nurses.

Rev Gaucha Enferm. 2016 Jun;37(2):

Authors: Pérez PE, Oliveira AC

PMID: 27356807 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Instantiating informatics in nursing practice for integrated patient centred holistic models of care: a discussion paper.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2017-01-19 00:53
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Instantiating informatics in nursing practice for integrated patient centred holistic models of care: a discussion paper.

J Adv Nurs. 2016 May;72(5):1030-41

Authors: Hussey PA, Kennedy MA

Abstract
AIM: A discussion on how informatics knowledge and competencies can enable nursing to instantiate transition to integrated models of care.
BACKGROUND: Costs of traditional models of care are no longer sustainable consequent to the spiralling incidence and costs of chronic illness. The international community looks towards technology-enabled solutions to support a shift towards integrated patient-centred models of care.
DESIGN: Discussion paper.
DATA SOURCES: A search of the literature was performed dating from 2000-2015 and a purposeful data sample based on relevance to building the discussion was included.
DISCUSSION: The holistic perspective of nursing knowledge can support and advance integrated healthcare models. Informatics skills are key for the profession to play a leadership role in design, implementation and operation of next generation health care. However, evidence suggests that nursing engagement with informatics strategic development for healthcare provision is currently variable.
IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: A statistically significant need exists to progress health care towards integrated models of care. Strategic and tactical plans that are robustly pragmatic with nursing insights and expertise are an essential component to achieve effective healthcare provision. To avoid exclusion in the discourse dominated by management and technology experts, nursing leaders must develop and actively promote the advancement of nursing informatics skills. For knowledge in nursing practice to flourish in contemporary health care, nurse leaders will need to incorporate informatics for optimal translation and interpretation.
CONCLUSION: Defined nursing leadership roles informed by informatics are essential to generate concrete solutions sustaining nursing practice in integrated care models.

PMID: 26890201 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The experience of informatics nurses in Taiwan.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2017-01-12 00:37
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The experience of informatics nurses in Taiwan.

J Prof Nurs. 2015 Mar-Apr;31(2):158-64

Authors: Liu CH, Lee TT, Mills ME

Abstract
Despite recent progress in information technology, health care institutions are constantly confronted with the need to adapt to the resulting new processes of information management and use. Facilitating an effective technology implementation requires dedication from informatics nurses (INs) to bridge the gap between clinical care and technology. The purpose of this study was to explore the working experiences of INs, and alternatives to assist the growth and development of the specialty. This qualitative study recruited 8 participants, and data were collected in 2009 by use of interview guides related to work roles, responsibilities, competencies, and challenges. The emerged themes included (a) diversified roles and functions, (b) vague job description, (c) no decision-making authority, (d) indispensable management support, and (e) searching resources for work fulfillment. Findings indicate that for organizations where nursing informatics development is ongoing, the IN role should be clearly defined as a specialist with identified support resources and decision-making authority. Nursing informatics interest groups should further develop training and certification programs to validate the professional image of the role. Concepts of nursing informatics should be included seamlessly throughout the educational curricula and informatics competency-based courses designed to strengthen student's technology use and data management capabilities.

PMID: 25839956 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Input of clinicians is vital in the shift to digital health care.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-01-10 18:35
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Input of clinicians is vital in the shift to digital health care.

Nurs Stand. 2015 May 06;29(36):33

Authors: Guy D

PMID: 25942982 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The Evolution of Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom in Nursing Informatics.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2017-01-04 12:20
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The Evolution of Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom in Nursing Informatics.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2016 Jan-Mar;39(1):E1-18

Authors: Ronquillo C, Currie LM, Rodney P

Abstract
The data-information-knowledge-wisdom (DIKW) model has been widely adopted in nursing informatics. In this article, we examine the evolution of DIKW in nursing informatics while incorporating critiques from other disciplines. This includes examination of assumptions of linearity and hierarchy and an exploration of the implicit philosophical grounding of the model. Two guiding questions are considered: (1) Does DIKW serve clinical information systems, nurses, or both? and (2) What level of theory does DIKW occupy? The DIKW model has been valuable in advancing the independent field of nursing informatics. We offer that if the model is to continue to move forward, its role and functions must be explicitly addressed.

PMID: 26836997 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

From the Editor.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2017-01-04 12:20
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From the Editor.

ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2016 Jan-Mar;39(1):1-2

Authors: Chinn PL

PMID: 26836989 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

'A whole world of opportunity'.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-12-28 15:03
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'A whole world of opportunity'.

Nurs Stand. 2015 Jan 27;29(21):64-5

Authors: Kendall-Raynor P

Abstract
Last year, NHS England announced that 74 trusts had been awarded a total of around £30 million from the Nursing Technology Fund. This is for projects to support nurses, midwives and health visitors make better use of digital technology for safer, more effective and efficient care.

PMID: 25605119 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Communicating Nursing Care Using the Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 Care Plan.

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Communicating Nursing Care Using the Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 Care Plan.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2016 Mar;34(3):128-36

Authors: Matney SA, Dolin G, Buhl L, Sheide A

Abstract
A care plan provides a patient, family, or community picture and outlines the care to be provided. The Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture (C-CDA) Release 2 Care Plan Document is used to structure care plan data when sharing the care plan between systems and/or settings. The American Nurses Association has recommended the use of two terminologies, Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for assessments and outcomes and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for problems, procedures (interventions), outcomes, and observation findings within the C-CDA. This article describes C-CDA, introduces LOINC and SNOMED CT, discusses how the C-CDA Care Plan aligns with the nursing process, and illustrates how nursing care data can be structured and encoded within a C-CDA Care Plan.

PMID: 26765657 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

National Nurses Week 2016: Culture of Safety: It Starts With YOU.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-12-21 14:46
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National Nurses Week 2016: Culture of Safety: It Starts With YOU.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2016 Apr;34(4):151

Authors: Bickford CJ, Cochran K

PMID: 27046260 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing Summit: Improving Transitions in Care Through Collaboration and Technology.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-12-21 14:46
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Nursing Summit: Improving Transitions in Care Through Collaboration and Technology.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2016 Mar;34(3):105-7

Authors: Maughan E, Green A, Henderson K, Ching J, Kuyl M, Noonan M, VanDyke Y, Team IMPaCT Executive Nurse Fellows (2013) Cohort, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, NJ

PMID: 26958993 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Case Study: Semantic Annotation of a Pediatric Critical Care Research Study.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-12-21 14:46
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Case Study: Semantic Annotation of a Pediatric Critical Care Research Study.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2016 Mar;34(3):101-4

Authors: Sward KA, Rubin S, Jenkins TL, Newth CJ, Dean JM, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN)

PMID: 26958992 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

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