nursing informatics

Development of the Austrian Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS-AT): the third Delphi Round, a quantitative online survey.

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Development of the Austrian Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS-AT): the third Delphi Round, a quantitative online survey.

Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;212:73-80

Authors: Ranegger R, Hackl WO, Ammenwerth E

Abstract
BACKGROUND: A Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) aims at systematically describing nursing care in terms of patient problems, nursing activities, and patient outcomes. In an earlier Delphi study, 56 data elements were proposed to be included in an Austrian Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS-AT).
OBJECTIVES: To identify the most important data elements of this list, and to identify appropriate coding systems.
METHODS: Online Delphi-based survey with 88 experts.
RESULTS: 43 data elements were rated as relevant for an NMDS-AT (strong agreement of more than half of the experts): nine data elements concerning the institution, patient demographics, and medical condition; 18 data elements concerning patient problems by using nursing diagnosis; seven data elements concerning nursing outcomes, and nine data elements concerning nursing interventions. As classification systems, national classification systems were proposed besides ICNP, NNN, and nursing-sensitive indicators.
CONCLUSION: The resulting proposal for an NMDS-AT will now be tested with routine data.

PMID: 26063260 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Creating a Scheduling System on a Budget.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sun, 2016-11-13 00:22
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Creating a Scheduling System on a Budget.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Nov;33(11):473-7

Authors: Nicoll LH

PMID: 26584312 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nurses' Own Recordkeeping: The Nursing Minimum Data Set Revisited.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sun, 2016-11-13 00:22
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Nurses' Own Recordkeeping: The Nursing Minimum Data Set Revisited.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Nov;33(11):487-94; quiz E1

Authors: Halloran EJ, Halloran DC

Abstract
There is no consistent, standardized, concise method for nurses to record information about their patients and clients that is conducive to store, retrieve, and use in patient and client care; to improve professional self-development; and to use in collaboration with patients and clients, their families, other nurses, doctors, hospitals, and health systems. Nurses gauge the health status of their patients and clients every day and are now in a position both to record their impressions for their own use and to share them with colleagues who care for the same patients and clients. What is now needed is a way to record these clinical impressions within an authoritative format that is related to the depth and breadth of the clinical literature related to nursing and the needs of the patients and clients nurses serve. The International Council of Nurses' Nurse-Patient Summary is proposed here to fill the gulf between narrative nurses' notes, proprietary and widely varying electronic health record systems, and information from nurses about their patiens and clients human needs. The International Council of Nurses' Nurse-Patient Summary could replace nursing diagnosis items in the Nursing Minimum Data Set and serve as a substitute for the World Health Organization's International Classification of Function, Disability and Health, a seldom used instrument derived from the International Council of Nurses' Basic Principles of Nursing Care.

PMID: 26554810 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing Informatics Competencies Among Nursing Students and Their Relationship to Patient Safety Competencies: Knowledge, Attitude, and Skills.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sun, 2016-11-13 00:22
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Nursing Informatics Competencies Among Nursing Students and Their Relationship to Patient Safety Competencies: Knowledge, Attitude, and Skills.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Nov;33(11):509-14

Authors: Abdrbo AA

Abstract
With implementation of information technology in healthcare settings to promote safety and evidence-based nursing care, a growing emphasis on the importance of nursing informatics competencies has emerged. This study assessed the relationship between nursing informatics and patient safety competencies among nursing students and nursing interns. A descriptive, cross-sectional correlational design with a convenience sample of 154 participants (99 nursing students and 55 interns) completed the Self-assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies and Patient Safety Competencies. The nursing students and interns were similar in age and years of computer experience, and more than half of the participants in both groups had taken a nursing informatics course. There were no significant differences between competencies in nursing informatics and patient safety except for clinical informatics role and applied computer skills in the two groups of participants. Nursing informatics competencies and patient safety competencies were significantly correlated except for clinical informatics role both with patient safety knowledge and attitude. These results provided feedback to adjust and incorporate informatics competencies in the baccalaureate program and to recommend embracing the nursing informatics course as one of the core courses, not as an elective course, in the curriculum.

PMID: 26524185 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Development of a Web-Based Self-management Intervention for Intermittent Urinary Catheter Users With Spinal Cord Injury.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sun, 2016-11-13 00:22
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Development of a Web-Based Self-management Intervention for Intermittent Urinary Catheter Users With Spinal Cord Injury.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Nov;33(11):478-86

Authors: Wilde MH, Fairbanks E, Parshall R, Zhang F, Miner S, Thayer D, Harrington B, Brasch J, McMAHON JM

Abstract
While Web-based interventions have proliferated recently, information in the literature is often lacking about how the intervention was developed. In response to that gap, this is a report of the development of a Web-based self-management intervention for intermittent urinary catheter users and pretesting with four adults with spinal cord injury living in the community. Two Web sites were created, one for recruitment and the other for the intervention itself. The intervention involved developing new Web-based technology, including an interactive urinary diary (with fluid intake/urine output and a journal), extensive catheter products information, three intervention nurse phone call consultations, and user-community discussion forums. Study participants completed an online survey and were interviewed twice about the enrollment process and their perceptions of their involvement in the intervention. Suggestions from the pretesting participants were used to revise the Web site applications prior to the next stage of research (a feasibility study). Numerous recommendations and comments were received related to content, interactivity of components, and usability. This article provides a description of how the Web sites were developed (including the technology and software programs used), issues encountered and what was done to address them, and how the Web-based intervention was modified for improvements.

PMID: 26361267 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

[For discussion: Quality assurance in medical care - is PKMS the right way to go?].

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[For discussion: Quality assurance in medical care - is PKMS the right way to go?].

Z Evid Fortbild Qual Gesundhwes. 2015;109(9-10):736-8

Authors: Hatzopoulos K, Jahn P, Knorr D, Wittrich A

Abstract
Hospitals are legally obliged to take part in external comparative quality assurance programs. Quality indicators for pressure ulcer prevention are among the most widely used for geriatric clinical institutions. To enable more precise risk adjustment established risk factors are employed in conjunction with the OPS 9-200. Using a PKMS case to produce an OPS 9-200 is far too heterogeneous, sketchy and vague to create an accurate and satisfactory pressure ulcer risk assessment for patients with varied and individual case factors. Therefore we propose to include risk factors which, according to experts, are clearly and specifically related to pressure ulcers (e.g. immobility and incontinence) and matched by unique ICD codes.

PMID: 26699262 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Automating lexical cross-mapping of ICNP to SNOMED CT.

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Automating lexical cross-mapping of ICNP to SNOMED CT.

Inform Health Soc Care. 2016;41(1):64-77

Authors: Kim TY

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of automating lexical cross-mapping of a logic-based nursing terminology (ICNP) to SNOMED CT using the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) maintained by the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
METHODS: A two-stage approach included patterns identification, and application and evaluation of an automated term matching procedure. The performance of the automated procedure was evaluated using a test set against a gold standard (i.e. concept equivalency table) created independently by terminology experts.
RESULTS: There were lexical similarities between ICNP diagnostic concepts and SNOMED CT. The automated term matching procedure was reliable as presented in recall of 65%, precision of 79%, accuracy of 82%, F-measure of 0.71 and the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of 0.78 (95% CI 0.73-0.83). When the automated procedure was not able to retrieve lexically matched concepts, it was also unlikely for terminology experts to identify a matched SNOMED CT concept.
CONCLUSIONS: Although further research is warranted to enhance the automated matching procedure, the combination of cross-maps from UMLS and the automated procedure is useful to generate candidate mappings and thus, assist ongoing maintenance of mappings which is a significant burden to terminology developers.

PMID: 25115967 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

[Technological competencies in cardiovascular nursing education].

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2016-09-16 15:40
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[Technological competencies in cardiovascular nursing education].

Rev Esc Enferm USP. 2015 Dec;49(6):974-80

Authors: Kobayashi RM, Leite MM

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify the perception of the coordinators of the Specialization Courses in Cardiovascular Nursing about inserting content from Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and analyze them in relation to the technological competencies and regarding its applicability, relevance and importance in assisting, teaching and management.
METHOD: Descriptive study with 10 coordinators of the Specialization course in Cardiologic Nursing, who replied to the questionnaire for the development of technological competency adapted from the Technology Initiative Guidelines Education Reforms (TIGER), and analyzed using the Delphi technique for obtaining consensus and scored according to the relevance, pertinence and applicability using Likert scale according to degree of agreement.
RESULTS: Six courses developed ICT content. The contents of the TIGER were considered relevant, pertinent and applicable.
CONCLUSION: The coordinators recognize the need for technological competencies of the Cardiovascular Nurse for healthcare applicability.

PMID: 27419682 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The promise of big data: Improving patient safety and nursing practice.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2016-09-16 15:40
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The promise of big data: Improving patient safety and nursing practice.

Nursing. 2016 May;46(5):28-34; quiz 34-5

Authors: Linnen D

PMID: 27028568 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

[Informatics competencies essential to decision making in nursing management].

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2016-09-16 15:40
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[Informatics competencies essential to decision making in nursing management].

Rev Esc Enferm USP. 2016 Feb;50(1):112-20

Authors: Jensen R, Guedes Ede S, Leite MM

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify informatics abilities essential to decision making in nursing management.
METHOD: Survey study with specialist nurses in health informatics and management. An electronic questionnaire was built based on the competencies Information Literacy (five categories; 40 abilities) and Information Management (nine categories; 69 abilities) of the TIGER - Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform - initiative, with the guiding question: Which informatics abilities are essential to decision making in management? Answers were sorted in a Likert scale, ranging from 1 to 5. Rasch analysis was conducted with the software WINSTEPS(®). Results were presented in logits, with cutoff value zero.
RESULTS: Thirty-two specialists participated, coming from all regions of Brazil. In the information literacy competency, 18 abilities were considered essential and in Information Management, 38; these were sorted according to their degree of essentiality.
CONCLUSION: It is believed that the incorporation of these abilities in teaching can support the education of nurse managers and contribute to evidence-based practice, incorporation of information and communication technologies in health and information management.

PMID: 27007428 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The Usage Behavior and Intention Stability of Nurses: An Empirical Study of a Nursing Information System.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2016-09-16 15:40
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The Usage Behavior and Intention Stability of Nurses: An Empirical Study of a Nursing Information System.

J Nurs Res. 2016 Mar;24(1):48-57

Authors: Lin IC, Lin C, Hsu CL, Roan J, Yeh JS, Cheng YH

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Many prior studies of technology adoption treat user intention as the single predictor of actual usage behavior. However, as many researchers of behavioral science have pointed out, multiple factors mediate the relationship between user intention and usage behavior.
PURPOSE: The present article explores the factors that mediate the relationship between intention and actual behavior. We develop a conceptual framework that is based on the Technology Acceptance Model III and behavior theory to further elicit system usage behavior and to confirm "intention stability" and "past experience" as two significant mediating factors in this relationship.
METHODS: The target system was a nursing information system that had been recently adopted by a medical center in central Taiwan. Data were collected using a questionnaire survey conducted in two rounds. Two hundred forty-five valid questionnaires were returned (response rate: 49%). Mediated moderation was analyzed to explore the presence of mediators or moderators between intention and behavior.
RESULTS: The results support that intention stability is a mediated moderator and that prior experience is a moderator of the relationship between intention and behavior. These two factors increased by over 13.6% the explanatory power of intention on actual behavior. Furthermore, this study expanded the scope of prior research by confirming intention stability as a moderating variable between intention and behavior. Finally, this study identified the moderating effect of past experience on the intention-behavior relationship, indicating that past experience enhances the predictive power of intention on behavior.
CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The findings of this study may assist hospital managers to better understand the nursing information system usage behaviors of nursing staff and to develop ways to enhance the intention stability of these staff. Managers may improve the familiarity of nursing staff with the system by increasing their system-related practice time. More experience should enhance staff system skills and resolve problems such as the need for extra work hours or overtime because of initial system unfamiliarity. Improved work efficiency should then allow nurses to divert more time from administrative work to patient care and training. This positive circle of support is expected to increase the willingness of nurses to accept and take advantage of the system.

PMID: 26551211 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

[Usability of computerized nursing process from the ICNP® in intensive care units].

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2016-09-16 15:40
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[Usability of computerized nursing process from the ICNP® in intensive care units].

Rev Esc Enferm USP. 2015 Apr;49(2):326-34

Authors: Barra DC, Sasso GT, Almeida SR

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyze the usability of Computerized Nursing Process (CNP) from the ICNP(®) 1.0 in Intensive Care Units in accordance with the criteria established by the standards of the International Organization for Standardization and the Brazilian Association of Technical Standards of systems.
METHOD: This is a before-and-after semi-experimental quantitative study, with a sample of 34 participants (nurses, professors and systems programmers), carried out in three Intensive Care Units.
RESULTS: The evaluated criteria (use, content and interface) showed that CNP has usability criteria, as it integrates a logical data structure, clinical assessment, diagnostics and nursing interventions.
CONCLUSION: The CNP is a source of information and knowledge that provide nurses with new ways of learning in intensive care, for it is a place that provides complete, comprehensive, and detailed content, supported by current and relevant data and scientific research information for Nursing practices.

PMID: 25992833 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

[Clarifying the goals of the research and selecting information sources].

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-09-14 15:03
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[Clarifying the goals of the research and selecting information sources].

Pflege Z. 2016 May;69(5):300-1; quiz 302

Authors: Messer M

PMID: 27501671 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

'The data is being collected--now it needs to move'.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-09-07 13:31
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'The data is being collected--now it needs to move'.

Mod Healthc. 2016 Mar 7;46(10):30-1

Authors: DeSalvo K, Conn J

PMID: 27333672 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Bibliometric Patterns of Research Literature Production on Nursing Informatics Competence.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2016-08-23 19:21
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Bibliometric Patterns of Research Literature Production on Nursing Informatics Competence.

J Nurs Educ. 2015 Oct;54(10):565-71

Authors: Kokol P, Vošner HB, Železnik D, Vošner J, Saranto K

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Nursing informatics competence is a prerequisite for successful information management, evidence-based practices optimizing patient care health promotion, and communication with information communication technology-literate patients.
METHOD: The aim of this study was to assess the trends in the production of nursing informatics competence research literature and to identify the most productive bibliometric entities. In addition to the correspondence analysis, bibliometric analysis and mapping were used to achieve the aim.
RESULTS: A total of 366 information sources were extracted, 14.5% of which were sponsored studies. The production of research literature on nursing informatics competence is growing, but this research is only occasionally published in the most recognized nursing journals.
CONCLUSION: Identifying where the intensive research on nursing informatics competence is beneficial to care for the patient of the future and building user-friendly online lifelong learning platforms, where a required level of nursing informatics competence could be acquired, are two gaps in the current research that should be covered in future.

PMID: 26431516 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Research in nursing informatics 2014.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-08-17 22:08
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Research in nursing informatics 2014.

Nurs Adm Q. 2015 Apr-Jun;39(2):E9-E16

Authors: Carrington JM, Tiase VL, Estrada N, Shea KD

Abstract
This article reflects the work done in the third year of the Nursing Informatics Year in Review project. This project seeks to search and analyze articles written by nurses as first author on the subject of nursing informatics, published August 2013-August 2014. Each year we also seek recommended articles from our American Medical Informatics Association-Nursing Informatics Work Group (AMIA-NIWG) members that meet the same criteria as the search and most influenced their thinking and scholarship. Twenty-seven articles emerged from the literature review, and our AMIA-NIWG members recommended 32 articles. We analyzed the articles by journal of publication, country of first author, source of funding, research method, research setting, and area of focus. The purpose of this article was to present the results of this project for 2014.

PMID: 25714959 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Summary of the nursing informatics year in review 2014.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-08-17 22:08
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Summary of the nursing informatics year in review 2014.

Nurs Adm Q. 2015 Apr-Jun;39(2):183-4

Authors: Carrington JM

PMID: 25714957 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics
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