nursing informatics

Investigation of the Effects of a Nursing Information System by Using the Technology Acceptance Model.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2017-09-13 13:03
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Investigation of the Effects of a Nursing Information System by Using the Technology Acceptance Model.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2017 Jun;35(6):315-322

Authors: Hsu HH, Wu YH

Abstract
The purposes of this study are to investigate the effectiveness of implementing a nursing information system and to discuss several issues affecting its successful deployment from the perspectives of nurses, the major users of the system. The methodology was based on the theory of the technology acceptance model. This study adopted a cross-sectional study method to survey and collect data. In total, 167 questionnaires were distributed to subjects. Approximately 94.6%, or 158 valid questionnaires, were collected. The data were analyzed using SPSS and PLS software.The data analysis indicated that the factors that most significantly influenced the willingness of nurses to use the nursing information system were their degrees of satisfaction with the system and their perceptions of its usefulness. A nursing information system that can provide functions that are useful and convenient and that facilitate the avoidance of tedious repetitive writing and improve the quality of provided care can encourage nurse satisfaction with the system and thus stimulate their interest in using it for their work. The ease of use of the system can also affect the willingness of nurses to use it.

PMID: 27832033 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder.

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Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder.

J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2017 Aug 01;55(8):32-38

Authors: Ambrogne JA

Abstract
Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most prevalent eating disorder in the United States, believed to affect an estimated 2.8 million adults. In the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, BED was recognized as a separate diagnosis. The purpose of the current article is to provide an overview of BED including assessment, diagnosis, and current pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment options. Implications for nursing are also addressed. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(8), 32-38.].

PMID: 28771285 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Model Guided Design and Development Process for an Electronic Health Record Training Program.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sat, 2017-08-26 12:53
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Model Guided Design and Development Process for an Electronic Health Record Training Program.

AMIA Annu Symp Proc. 2016;2016:1814-1821

Authors: He Z, Marquard J, Henneman E

Abstract
Effective user training is important to ensure electronic health record (EHR) implementation success. Though many previous studies report best practice principles and success and failure stories, current EHR training is largely empirically-based and often lacks theoretical guidance. In addition, the process of training development is underemphasized and underreported. A white paper by the American Medical Informatics Association called for models of user training for clinical information system implementation; existing instructional development models from learning theory provide a basis to meet this call. We describe in this paper our experiences and lessons learned as we adapted several instructional development models to guide our development of EHR user training. Specifically, we focus on two key aspects of this training development: training content and training process.

PMID: 28269940 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

[NIC as a tool for assessing competences of nursing students in clinical placement at surgical units].

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[NIC as a tool for assessing competences of nursing students in clinical placement at surgical units].

Enferm Clin. 2015 Jul-Aug;25(4):158-70

Authors: Celma Vicente M, Ajuria-Imaz E, Lopez-Morales M, Fernandez-Marín P, Menor-Castro A, Cano-Caballero Galvez MD

Abstract
BACKGROUND: This paper shows the utility of a NIC standardized language to assess the extent of nursing student skills at Practicum in surgical units
OBJECTIVE: To identify the nursing interventions classification (NIC) that students can learn to perform in surgical units. To determine the level of difficulty in learning interventions, depending on which week of rotation in clinical placement the student is.
METHOD: Qualitative study using Delphi consensus technique, involving nurses with teaching experience who work in hospital surgical units, where students undertake the Practicum. The results were triangulated through a questionnaire to tutors about the degree of conformity.
RESULTS: A consensus was reached about the interventions that students can achieve in surgical units and the frequency in which they can be performed. The level of difficulty of each intervention, and the amount of weeks of practice that students need to reach the expected level of competence was also determined.
CONCLUSION: The results should enable us to design better rotations matched to student needs. Knowing the frequency of each intervention that is performed in each unit determines the chances of learning it, as well as the indicators for its assessment.

PMID: 26078094 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nurses' use of computerised decision support systems affects drug monitoring in nursing homes.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2017-08-23 12:51
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Nurses' use of computerised decision support systems affects drug monitoring in nursing homes.

J Nurs Manag. 2017 Jan;25(1):56-64

Authors: Johansson-Pajala RM, Gustafsson LK, Jorsäter Blomgren K, Fastbom J, Martin L

Abstract
AIM: To describe variations in nurses' perceptions of using a computerised decision support system (CDSS) in drug monitoring.
BACKGROUND: There is an increasing focus on incorporating informatics into registered nurses' (RNs) clinical practice. Insight into RNs' perceptions of using a CDSS in drug monitoring can provide a basis for further development of safer practices in drug management.
METHOD: A qualitative interview study of 16 RNs. Data were analysed using a phenomenographic approach.
RESULTS: The RNs perceived a variety of aspects of using a CDSS in drug monitoring. Aspects of 'time' were evident, as was giving a 'standardisation' to the clinical work. There were perceptions of effects of obtained knowledge and 'evidence' and the division of 'responsibilities' between RNs and physicians of using the CDSS.
CONCLUSION: The RNs perceived a CDSS as supportive in drug monitoring, in terms of promoting standardised routines, team-collaboration and providing possibilities for evidence-based clinical practice.
IMPLICATIONS: Implementing a CDSS seems to be one feasible strategy to improve RNs' preconditions for safe drug management. Nurse managers' engagement and support in this process are vital for a successful result.

PMID: 27620980 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Perinatal and Neonatal Health Information Technology: Past, Present, and Future.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-07-18 15:31
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Perinatal and Neonatal Health Information Technology: Past, Present, and Future.

J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2016 Jul-Sep;30(3):209-13

Authors: McCartney PR, Drake EE

Abstract
The 3 decades of The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing history share the same 3 decades as the birth of the information age and health information technology (HIT). This article summarizes the history of HIT and the corresponding publication history of The Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing. Health information technology content has evolved from being the "how-to operate" topic of a publication to being integrated within a nursing practice publication. The article concludes with current HIT challenges and implications for the future.

PMID: 27465451 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Actor-Network Theory as a sociotechnical lens to explore the relationship of nurses and technology in practice: methodological considerations for nursing research.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-07-18 15:31
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Actor-Network Theory as a sociotechnical lens to explore the relationship of nurses and technology in practice: methodological considerations for nursing research.

Nurs Inq. 2016 Jun;23(2):109-20

Authors: Booth RG, Andrusyszyn MA, Iwasiw C, Donelle L, Compeau D

Abstract
Actor-Network Theory is a research lens that has gained popularity in the nursing and health sciences domains. The perspective allows a researcher to describe the interaction of actors (both human and non-human) within networked sociomaterial contexts, including complex practice environments where nurses and health technology operate. This study will describe Actor-Network Theory and provide methodological considerations for researchers who are interested in using this sociotechnical lens within nursing and informatics-related research. Considerations related to technology conceptualization, levels of analysis, and sampling procedures in Actor-Network Theory based research are addressed. Finally, implications for future nursing research within complex environments are highlighted.

PMID: 26531190 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nurse Informaticians Report Low Satisfaction and Multi-level Concerns with Electronic Health Records: Results from an International Survey.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2017-07-14 12:29
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Nurse Informaticians Report Low Satisfaction and Multi-level Concerns with Electronic Health Records: Results from an International Survey.

AMIA Annu Symp Proc. 2016;2016:2016-2025

Authors: Topaz M, Ronquillo C, Peltonen LM, Pruinelli L, Sarmiento RF, Badger MK, Ali S, Lewis A, Georgsson M, Jeon E, Tayaben JL, Kuo CH, Islam T, Sommer J, Jung H, Eler GJ, Alhuwail D, Lee YL

Abstract
This study presents a qualitative content analysis of nurses' satisfaction and issues with current electronic health record (EHR) systems, as reflected in one of the largest international surveys of nursing informatics. Study participants from 45 countries (n=469) ranked their satisfaction with the current state of nursing functionality in EHRs as relatively low. Two-thirds of the participants (n=283) provided disconcerting comments when explaining their low satisfaction rankings. More than one half of the comments identified issues at the system level (e.g., poor system usability; non-integrated systems and poor interoperability; lack of standards; and limited functionality/missing components), followed by user-task issues (e.g., failure of systems to meet nursing clinical needs; non nursing-specific systems) and environment issues (e.g., low prevalence of EHRs; lack of user training). The study results call for the attention of international stakeholders (educators, managers, policy makers) to improve the current issues with EHRs from a nursing perspective.

PMID: 28269961 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing Informatics Certification Worldwide: History, Pathway, Roles, and Motivation.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2017-06-30 21:21
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Nursing Informatics Certification Worldwide: History, Pathway, Roles, and Motivation.

Yearb Med Inform. 2016 Nov 10;(1):264-271

Authors: Cummins MR, Gundlapalli AV, Gundlapalli AV, Murray P, Park HA, Lehmann CU

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Official recognition and certification for informatics professionals are essential aspects of workforce development.
OBJECTIVE: To describe the history, pathways, and nuances of certification in nursing informatics across the globe; compare and contrast those with board certification in clinical informatics for physicians.
METHODS: (1) A review of the representative literature on informatics certification and related competencies for nurses and physicians, and relevant websites for nursing informatics associations and societies worldwide; (2) similarities and differences between certification processes for nurses and physicians, and (3) perspectives on roles for nursing informatics professionals in healthcare Results: The literature search for 'nursing informatics certification' yielded few results in PubMed; Google Scholar yielded a large number of citations that extended to magazines and other non-peer reviewed sources. Worldwide, there are several nursing informatics associations, societies, and workgroups dedicated to nursing informatics associated with medical/health informatics societies. A formal certification program for nursing informatics appears to be available only in the United States. This certification was established in 1992, in concert with the formation and definition of nursing informatics as a specialty practice of nursing by the American Nurses Association. Although informatics is inherently interprofessional, certification pathways for nurses and physicians have developed separately, following long-standing professional structures, training, and pathways aligned with clinical licensure and direct patient care. There is substantial similarity with regard to the skills and competencies required for nurses and physicians to obtain informatics certification in their respective fields. Nurses may apply for and complete a certification examination if they have experience in the field, regardless of formal training. Increasing numbers of informatics nurses are pursuing certification.
CONCLUSIONS: The pathway to certification is clear and wellestablished for U.S. based informatics nurses. The motivation for obtaining and maintaining nursing informatics certification appears to be stronger for nurses who do not have an advanced informatics degree. The primary difference between nursing and physician certification pathways relates to the requirement of formal training and level of informatics practice. Nurse informatics certification requires no formal education or training and verifies knowledge and skill at a more basic level. Physician informatics certification validates informatics knowledge and skill at a more advanced level; currently this requires documentation of practice and experience in clinical informatics and in the future will require successful completion of an accredited two-year fellowship in clinical informatics. For the profession of nursing, a graduate degree in nursing or biomedical informatics validates specialty knowledge at a level more comparable to the physician certification. As the field of informatics and its professional organization structures mature, a common certification pathway may be appropriate. Nurses, physicians, and other healthcare professionals with informatics training and certification are needed to contribute their expertise in clinical operations, teaching, research, and executive leadership.

PMID: 27830261 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics
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