nursing informatics

Nursing informatics and learning health system.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2016-02-02 16:37
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Nursing informatics and learning health system.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2014 Oct;32(10):471-4

Authors: Cummins MR

PMID: 25325674 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

ANI Emerging Leaders Project: CLinical Informatics Governance & Nursing Leadership.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2016-02-02 16:37
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ANI Emerging Leaders Project: CLinical Informatics Governance & Nursing Leadership.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2014 Sep;32(9):420-3

Authors: Collins S

PMID: 25226405 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Perceived sense of community, cognitive engagement, and learning outcomes among undergraduate nursing students enrolled in an internet-based learning course.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2016-02-02 16:37
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Perceived sense of community, cognitive engagement, and learning outcomes among undergraduate nursing students enrolled in an internet-based learning course.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2014 Oct;32(10):482-9; quiz 490-1

Authors: Seckman CA

Abstract
Internet-based learning environments are a popular instructional delivery method that provides flexibility, easy access, convenience, and self-directed learning. There is concern that Internet-based learning creates a loss of community and lacks the power to fully engage the student, leading to negative learning outcomes. This descriptive, correlational study evaluated the relationship among a perceived sense of community, cognitive engagement, and learner outcomes among undergraduate nursing students enrolled in an Internet-based learning course. A convenience sample of 96 undergraduate nursing students enrolled in an online health informatics course participated in this study. Findings indicated a moderate sense of community and a positive relationship between student engagement and learning outcomes. A variety of group activities such as wikis, blogs, and discussion board were helpful in promoting a sense of community, but students emphasized a desire for more faculty feedback and interaction. Nursing is a collaborative profession where community building is a critical skill; therefore, innovative teaching/learning techniques that promote a sense of belonging and community are needed to improve learning outcomes, prepare students to provide quality patient care, and interact with an interprofessional team.

PMID: 24949712 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing informatics.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2016-01-12 15:14
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Nursing informatics.

Home Healthc Nurse. 2014 Sep;32(8):497-8

Authors: Schneider JS

PMID: 25171242 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Development of an Online Data Applications Course Using an Interprofessional Education Model.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-01-06 14:54
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Development of an Online Data Applications Course Using an Interprofessional Education Model.

Nurse Educ. 2015 Jul-Aug;40(4):E1-4

Authors: Restrepo E, Meraz R

Abstract
Development of a data applications course with an interdisciplinary focus presented challenges for nurses participating in the design of a post-master's certificate program in informatics. In this article, we describe our use of an interprofessional education model to create the course and discuss our experiences in teaching the course for the first time. We identify our challenges and plan to address them in future semesters.

PMID: 25628242 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing students' attitudes towards information and communication technology: an exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic approach.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2015-12-31 17:39
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Nursing students' attitudes towards information and communication technology: an exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic approach.

J Adv Nurs. 2015 May;71(5):1181-93

Authors: Lee JJ, Clarke CL

Abstract
AIM: The aim of this study was to develop and psychometrically test a shortened version of the Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health, in the investigation of nursing students with clinical placement experiences.
BACKGROUND: Nurses and nursing students need to develop high levels of competency in information and communication technology. However, they encounter statistically significant barriers in the use of the technology. Although some instruments have been developed to measure factors that influence nurses' attitudes towards technology, the validity is questionable and few studies have been developed to test the attitudes of nursing students, in particular.
DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey design was performed.
METHODS: The Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health was used to collect data from October 2012-December 2012. A panel of experts reviewed the content of the instrument and a pilot study was conducted. Following this, a total of 508 nursing students, who were engaged in clinical placements, were recruited from six universities in South Korea. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed and reliability and construct validity were assessed.
RESULTS: The resulting instrument consisted of 19 items across four factors. Reliability of the four factors was acceptable and the validity was supported.
CONCLUSIONS: The instrument was shown to be both valid and reliable for measuring nursing students' attitudes towards technology, thus aiding in the current understandings of this aspect. Through these measurements and understandings, nursing educators and students are able to be more reflexive of their attitudes and can thus seek to develop them positively.

PMID: 25586107 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The role of health care technology in support of perinatal nurse staffing.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2015-12-17 13:51
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The role of health care technology in support of perinatal nurse staffing.

J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2015 Mar-Apr;44(2):309-16

Authors: Ivory CH

Abstract
Health care technology can generate massive amounts of data. However, when data are generated from disparate, uncoordinated systems, using them to make decisions related to staffing can be a challenge. In this article, I describe the importance of data standardization, system interoperability, standard terminologies that support nursing practice, and nursing informatics expertise as tools for improving the usefulness of electronic systems for informing staffing decisions.

PMID: 25652033 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

[ICNP- International Classification of Nursing Practice: origin, structure and development].

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2015-12-15 19:46
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[ICNP- International Classification of Nursing Practice: origin, structure and development].

Prof Inferm. 2015 Apr-Jun;68(2):131-40

Authors: Marucci AR, De Caro W, Petrucci C, Lancia L, Sansoni J

Abstract
ICNP is a standardized nursing terminology included within acknowledged terminologies by WHO, it is a relevant aspect of ICN programs and strategies. This paper aims to describe structure and characteristics of ICNP terminology as well as to highlight how this tool can be useful both in practice and in terms of nursing professional development. This version looks like a pyramid with seven axes describing different areas of nursing and related interventions, enriched by two special axes related to pre-coordinated Diagnosis / Outcomes (DC) and Operations (IC) which facilitate daily use in practice. In order to clarify how this tool can be actually be used in daily nursing practice some examples are provided, clarifying how adopting the current version of ICNP terminology (2015 release) Diagnosis/Outcomes and Interventions can be built. The ICNP Italian Centre is committed to introduce it to Italian nurses as a tool for sharing and disseminating terminology in our Country, having as main final aim to achieve even in Italy, professional visibility objectives promoted in different ways by the International Council of Nurses.

PMID: 26402233 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Evaluation of embedded audio feedback on writing assignments.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sat, 2015-11-14 17:53
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Evaluation of embedded audio feedback on writing assignments.

J Nurs Educ. 2015 Jan;54(1):41-4

Authors: Graves JK, Goodman JT, Hercinger M, Minnich M, Murcek CM, Parks JM, Shirley N

Abstract
The purpose of this pilot study was to compare embedded audio feedback (EAF), which faculty provided using the iPad(®) application iAnnotate(®) PDF to insert audio comments and written feedback (WF), inserted electronically on student papers in a series of writing assignments. Goals included determining whether EAF provides more useful guidance to students than WF and whether EAF promotes connectedness among students and faculty. An additional goal was to ascertain the efficiency and acceptance of EAF as a grading tool by nursing faculty. The pilot study was a quasi-experimental, cross-over, posttest-only design. The project was completed in an Informatics in Health Care course. Faculty alternated the two feedback methods on four papers written by each student. Results of surveys and focus groups revealed that students and faculty had mixed feelings about this technology. Student preferences were equally divided between EAF and WF, with 35% for each, and 28% were undecided.

PMID: 25535759 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

A national action plan for sharable and comparable nursing data to support practice and translational research for transforming health care.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2015-11-13 17:51
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A national action plan for sharable and comparable nursing data to support practice and translational research for transforming health care.

J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2015 May;22(3):600-7

Authors: Westra BL, Latimer GE, Matney SA, Park JI, Sensmeier J, Simpson RL, Swanson MJ, Warren JJ, Delaney CW

Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is wide recognition that, with the rapid implementation of electronic health records (EHRs), large data sets are available for research. However, essential standardized nursing data are seldom integrated into EHRs and clinical data repositories. There are many diverse activities that exist to implement standardized nursing languages in EHRs; however, these activities are not coordinated, resulting in duplicate efforts rather than building a shared learning environment and resources.
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this paper is to describe the historical context of nursing terminologies, challenges to the use of nursing data for purposes other than documentation of care, and a national action plan for implementing and using sharable and comparable nursing data for quality reporting and translational research.
METHODS: In 2013 and 2014, the University of Minnesota School of Nursing hosted a diverse group of nurses to participate in the Nursing Knowledge: Big Data and Science to Transform Health Care consensus conferences. This consensus conference was held to develop a national action plan and harmonize existing and new efforts of multiple individuals and organizations to expedite integration of standardized nursing data within EHRs and ensure their availability in clinical data repositories for secondary use. This harmonization will address the implementation of standardized nursing terminologies and subsequent access to and use of clinical nursing data.
CONCLUSION: Foundational to integrating nursing data into clinical data repositories for big data and science, is the implementation of standardized nursing terminologies, common data models, and information structures within EHRs. The 2014 National Action Plan for Sharable and Comparable Nursing Data for Transforming Health and Healthcare builds on and leverages existing, but separate long standing efforts of many individuals and organizations. The plan is action focused, with accountability for coordinating and tracking progress designated.

PMID: 25670754 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing domain of CI governance: recommendations for health IT adoption and optimization.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2015-11-13 17:51
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Nursing domain of CI governance: recommendations for health IT adoption and optimization.

J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2015 May;22(3):697-706

Authors: Collins SA, Alexander D, Moss J

Abstract
CONTEXT: There is a lack of recommended models for clinical informatics (CI) governance that can facilitate successful health information technology implementation.
OBJECTIVES: To understand existing CI governance structures and provide a model with recommended roles, partnerships, and councils based on perspectives of nursing informatics leaders.
DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: We conducted a cross-sectional study through administering a survey via telephone to facilitate semistructured interviews from June 2012 through November 2012. We interviewed 12 nursing informatics leaders, across the United States, currently serving in executive- or director-level CI roles at integrated health care systems that have pioneered electronic health records implementation projects.
RESULTS: We found the following 4 themes emerge: (1) Interprofessional partnerships are essential. (2) Critical role-based levels of practice and competencies need to be defined. (3) Integration into existing clinical infrastructure facilitates success. (4) CI governance is an evolving process. We described specific lessons learned and a model of CI governance with recommended roles, partnerships, and councils from the perspective of nursing informatics leaders.
CONCLUSION: Applied CI work is highly interprofessional with patient safety implications that heighten the need for best practice models for governance structures, adequate resource allocation, and role-based competencies. Overall, there is a notable lack of a centralized CI group comprised of formally trained informaticians to provide expertise and promote adherence to informatics principles within EHR implementation governance structures. Our model of the nursing domain of CI governance with recommended roles, partnerships, and councils provides a starting point that should be further explored and validated. Not only can the model be used to understand, shape, and standardize roles, competencies, and structures within CI practice for nursing, it can be used within other clinical domains and by other informaticians.

PMID: 25670752 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

A nursing information model process for interoperability.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2015-11-13 17:51
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A nursing information model process for interoperability.

J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2015 May;22(3):608-14

Authors: Chow M, Beene M, O'Brien A, Greim P, Cromwell T, DuLong D, Bedecarré D

Abstract
The ability to share nursing data across organizations and electronic health records is a key component of improving care coordination and quality outcomes. Currently, substantial organizational and technical barriers limit the ability to share and compare essential patient data that inform nursing care. Nursing leaders at Kaiser Permanente and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs collaborated on the development of an evidence-based information model driven by nursing practice to enable data capture, re-use, and sharing between organizations and disparate electronic health records. This article describes a framework with repeatable steps and processes to enable the semantic interoperability of relevant and contextual nursing data. Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevention was selected as the prototype nurse-sensitive quality measure to develop and test the model. In a Health 2.0 Developer Challenge program from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health, mobile applications implemented the model to help nurses assess the risk of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and reduce their severity. The common information model can be applied to other nurse-sensitive measures to enable data standardization supporting patient transitions between care settings, quality reporting, and research.

PMID: 25656515 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Childbirth and criteria for traumatic events.

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Childbirth and criteria for traumatic events.

Midwifery. 2014 Feb;30(2):255-61

Authors: Boorman RJ, Devilly GJ, Gamble J, Creedy DK, Fenwick J

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: for some women childbirth is physically and psychologically traumatic and meets Criterion A1 (threat) and A2 (intense emotional response) for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition (DSM-IV).This study differentiates Criterion A1 and A2 to explore their individual relationship to prevalence rates for posttraumatic stress, each other, and associated factors for childbirth trauma.
DESIGN AND SETTING: women were recruited at three hospitals from October 2008 to October 2009. Questionnaires were completed at recruitment and at 14 days post partum.
PARTICIPANTS: women in the third trimester of pregnancy (n=890) were recruited by a research midwife while waiting for their antenatal clinic appointment. Participants were over 17 years of age, expected to give birth to a live infant, not undergoing psychological treatment, and able to complete questionnaires in English.
FINDINGS: this study found 14.3% of women met criteria for a traumatic childbirth. When the condition of A2 was removed, the prevalence rate doubled to 29.4%. Approximately half the women who perceived threat in childbirth did not have an intense negative emotional response. Predictors of finding childbirth traumatic were pre-existing psychiatric morbidity, being a first time mother and experiencing an emergency caesarean section.
KEY CONCLUSIONS: the fear response is an important diagnostic criterion for assessing psychologically traumatic childbirth. The identification of risk factors may inform maternity service delivery to prevent traumatic birth and postpartum approaches to care to address long-term negative consequences.
IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: prevention and treatment of traumatic childbirth are improved through knowledge of potential risk factors and understanding the woman's subjective experience.

PMID: 23623901 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics
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