nursing informatics

Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record: Challenges and Success Strategies.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2017-03-30 14:44
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Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record: Challenges and Success Strategies.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2016 Aug;34(8):345-54

Authors: Herbert VM, Connors H

Abstract
Technology is increasing the complexity in the role of today's nurse. Healthcare organizations are integrating more health information technologies and relying on the electronic health record for data collection, communication, and decision making. Nursing faculty need to prepare graduates for this environment and incorporate an academic electronic health record into a nursing curriculum to meet student-program outcomes. Although the need exists for student preparation, some nursing programs are struggling with implementation, whereas others have been successful. To better understand these complexities, this project was intended to identify current challenges and success strategies of effective academic electronic health record integration into nursing curricula. Using Rogers' 1962 Diffusion of Innovation theory as a framework for technology adoption, a descriptive survey design was used to gain insights from deans and program directors of nursing schools involved with the national Health Informatics & Technology Scholars faculty development program or Cerner's Academic Education Solution Consortium, working to integrate an academic electronic health record in their respective nursing schools. The participants' experiences highlighted approaches used by these schools to integrate these technologies. Data from this project provide nursing education with effective strategies and potential challenges that should be addressed for successful academic electronic health record integration.

PMID: 27326804 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The impact of genomics on health outcomes, quality, and safety.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2017-03-30 14:44
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The impact of genomics on health outcomes, quality, and safety.

Nurs Manage. 2016 Apr;47(4):23-6

Authors: McCormick KA, Calzone KA

PMID: 27022903 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Advanced Nursing Process quality: Comparing the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) with the NANDA-International (NANDA-I) and Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC).

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Advanced Nursing Process quality: Comparing the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) with the NANDA-International (NANDA-I) and Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC).

J Clin Nurs. 2017 Feb;26(3-4):379-387

Authors: Rabelo-Silva ER, Dantas Cavalcanti AC, Ramos Goulart Caldas MC, Lucena AF, Almeida MA, Linch GF, da Silva MB, Müller-Staub M

Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To assess the quality of the advanced nursing process in nursing documentation in two hospitals.
BACKGROUND: Various standardised terminologies are employed by nurses worldwide, whether for teaching, research or patient care. These systems can improve the quality of nursing records, enable care continuity, consistency in written communication and enhance safety for patients and providers alike.
DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.
METHODS: A total of 138 records from two facilities (69 records from each facility) were analysed, one using the NANDA-International and Nursing Interventions Classification terminology (Centre 1) and one the International Classification for Nursing Practice (Centre 2), by means of the Quality of Diagnoses, Interventions, and Outcomes instrument. Quality of Diagnoses, Interventions, and Outcomes scores range from 0-58 points. Nursing records were dated 2012-2013 for Centre 1 and 2010-2011 for Centre 2.
RESULTS: Centre 1 had a Quality of Diagnoses, Interventions, and Outcomes score of 35·46 (±6·45), whereas Centre 2 had a Quality of Diagnoses, Interventions, and Outcomes score of 31·72 (±4·62) (p < 0·001). Centre 2 had higher scores in the 'Nursing Diagnoses as Process' dimension, whereas in the 'Nursing Diagnoses as Product', 'Nursing Interventions' and 'Nursing Outcomes' dimensions, Centre 1 exhibited superior performance; acceptable reliability values were obtained for both centres, except for the 'Nursing Interventions' domain in Centre 1 and the 'Nursing Diagnoses as Process' and 'Nursing Diagnoses as Product' domains in Centre 2.
CONCLUSION: The quality of nursing documentation was superior at Centre 1, although both facilities demonstrated moderate scores considering the maximum potential score of 58 points. Reliability analyses showed satisfactory results for both standardised terminologies.
RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nursing leaders should use a validated instrument to investigate the quality of nursing records after implementation of standardised terminologies.

PMID: 27192041 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The intersection of policy and informatics.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2017-03-23 13:38
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The intersection of policy and informatics.

Nurs Manage. 2016 Feb;47(2):12-3

Authors: Biddle S, Milstead JA

PMID: 26807830 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

NAQ's 40th Birthday Nursing: Predictions From the Past; Predictions for the Future, Parts I & II.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2017-03-16 22:35
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NAQ's 40th Birthday Nursing: Predictions From the Past; Predictions for the Future, Parts I & II.

Nurs Adm Q. 2016 Oct-Dec;40(4):283-91

Authors: McClure ML, Batcheller J

Abstract
The following two articles relate to Nursing's past and future, described through a series of predictions made by one of Nursing's great leaders Margaret L. McClure (Maggie McClure). It is reprinted from NAQ Fall 2000, Volume 25, Issue 1. The second article, by another great leader, Joyce Batcheller, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, is a follow up on those predictions, reflecting on Nursing today and tommorow.

PMID: 27584886 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Educating the nurses of 2025: Technology trends of the next decade.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-02-28 16:24
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Educating the nurses of 2025: Technology trends of the next decade.

Nurse Educ Pract. 2017 Jan;22:89-92

Authors: Risling T

Abstract
The pace of technological evolution in healthcare is advancing. In this article key technology trends are identified that are likely to influence nursing practice and education over the next decade. The complexity of curricular revision can create challenges in the face of rapid practice change. Nurse educators are encouraged to consider the role of electronic health records (EHRs), wearable technologies, big data and data analytics, and increased patient engagement as key areas for curriculum development. Student nurses, and those already in practice, should be offered ongoing educational opportunities to enhance a wide spectrum of professional informatics skills. The nurses of 2025 will most certainly inhabit a very different practice environment than what exists today and technology will be key in this transformation. Nurse educators must prepare now to lead these practitioners into the future.

PMID: 28049072 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Trends in Nursing Informatics Research and the Importance of the Nurse Administrator.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-02-28 16:24
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Trends in Nursing Informatics Research and the Importance of the Nurse Administrator.

Nurs Adm Q. 2016 Apr-Jun;40(2):184-5

Authors: Carrington JM

PMID: 26938191 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Strategies to Deliver Safe, Technology-Enhanced Care in Pediatric Settings.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2017-02-22 16:18
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Strategies to Deliver Safe, Technology-Enhanced Care in Pediatric Settings.

J Pediatr Nurs. 2016 Mar-Apr;31(2):224-7

Authors: Goldschmidt K

PMID: 26920636 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Feasibility of Using the Omaha System for Community-level Observations.

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Feasibility of Using the Omaha System for Community-level Observations.

Public Health Nurs. 2016 05;33(3):256-63

Authors: Kerr MJ, Flaten C, Honey ML, Gargantua-Aguila Sdel R, Nahcivan NO, Martin KS, Monsen KA

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a standardized language, the Omaha System, to capture community-level observations to facilitate population assessment and electronic information exchange. The objectives were: (1) to evaluate the feasibility of using the Omaha System at the community level to reflect community observations and (2) to describe preliminary results of community observations across international settings.
DESIGN AND SAMPLE: Descriptive. A dataset of 284 windshield surveys (community observations) completed by nursing students in five countries: Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Turkey, and the United States.
MEASURES: The Omaha System Problem Classification Scheme provided standardized terms for assessment of communities in an online checklist of 11 problems and their respective signs/symptoms.
RESULTS: Feasibility was demonstrated: students were able to describe community observations using standardized terminology from the Omaha System. Preliminary results describe variations in community signs and symptoms by location.
CONCLUSIONS: The Omaha System appears to be a useful tool for community-level observations and a promising strategy for electronic exchange of population health assessments.

PMID: 26429415 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The Explosion of Virtual Nursing Care.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Tue, 2017-02-14 16:12
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The Explosion of Virtual Nursing Care.

J Nurs Adm. 2017 Feb;47(2):85-87

Authors: Boston-Fleischhauer C

Abstract
The call for care model innovation is clear, spearheaded by rising healthcare costs, changing payer expectations, overall fiscal and workforce shortages, and an increasingly comorbid patient population requiring significant, long-term support. As part of care model innovation, the leveraging of technology is key.

PMID: 28106680 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Refining a self-assessment of informatics competency scale using Mokken scaling analysis.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2017-02-09 16:10
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Refining a self-assessment of informatics competency scale using Mokken scaling analysis.

J Interprof Care. 2015;29(6):579-86

Authors: Yoon S, Shaffer JA, Bakken S

Abstract
Healthcare environments are increasingly implementing health information technology (HIT) and those from various professions must be competent to use HIT in meaningful ways. In addition, HIT has been shown to enable interprofessional approaches to health care. The purpose of this article is to describe the refinement of the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale (SANICS) using analytic techniques based upon item response theory (IRT) and discuss its relevance to interprofessional education and practice. In a sample of 604 nursing students, the 93-item version of SANICS was examined using non-parametric IRT. The iterative modeling procedure included 31 steps comprising: (1) assessing scalability, (2) assessing monotonicity, (3) assessing invariant item ordering, and (4) expert input. SANICS was reduced to an 18-item hierarchical scale with excellent reliability. Fundamental skills for team functioning and shared decision making among team members (e.g. "using monitoring systems appropriately," "describing general systems to support clinical care") had the highest level of difficulty, and "demonstrating basic technology skills" had the lowest difficulty level. Most items reflect informatics competencies relevant to all health professionals. Further, the approaches can be applied to construct a new hierarchical scale or refine an existing scale related to informatics attitudes or competencies for various health professions.

PMID: 26652630 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

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