nursing informatics

The Omaha System: a systematic review of the recent literature.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2014-02-07 14:56
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The Omaha System: a systematic review of the recent literature.

J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2014 Jan-Feb;21(1):163-70

Authors: Topaz M, Golfenshtein N, Bowles KH

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Omaha System (OS) is one of the oldest of the American Nurses Association recognized standardized terminologies describing and measuring the impact of healthcare services. This systematic review presents the state of science on the use of the OS in practice, research, and education.
AIMS: (1) To identify, describe and evaluate the publications on the OS between 2004 and 2011, (2) to identify major trends in the use of the OS in research, practice, and education, and (3) to suggest areas for future research.
METHODS: Systematic search in the largest online healthcare databases (PUBMED, CINAHL, Scopus, PsycINFO, Ovid) from 2004 to 2011. Methodological quality of the reviewed research studies was evaluated.
RESULTS: 56 publications on the OS were identified and analyzed. The methodological quality of the reviewed research studies was relatively high. Over time, publications' focus shifted from describing clients' problems toward outcomes research. There was an increasing application of advanced statistical methods and a significant portion of authors focused on classification and interoperability research. There was an increasing body of international literature on the OS. Little research focused on the theoretical aspects of the OS, the effective use of the OS in education, or cultural adaptations of the OS outside the USA.
CONCLUSIONS: The OS has a high potential to provide meaningful and high quality information about complex healthcare services. Further research on the OS should focus on its applicability in healthcare education, theoretical underpinnings and international validity. Researchers analyzing the OS data should address how they attempted to mitigate the effects of missing data in analyzing their results and clearly present the limitations of their studies.

PMID: 23744786 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Oncology nurses continue to reinvent themselves for the future.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2014-02-05 14:45
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Oncology nurses continue to reinvent themselves for the future.

ONS Connect. 2013 Dec;28(4):52-5

Authors: McKrell M

PMID: 24400586 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Finding the evidence.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2014-02-05 14:45
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Finding the evidence.

Neonatal Netw. 2013 May-Jun;32(3):203-5

Authors: Raines DA

PMID: 23666191 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Getting the intermittent catheter the patient needs: considerations in coding, coverage and documentation. Author's response.

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Getting the intermittent catheter the patient needs: considerations in coding, coverage and documentation. Author's response.

Urol Nurs. 2013 Sep-Oct;33(5):257

Authors: Boettcher S

PMID: 24354116 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Getting the intermittent catheter the patient needs: considerations in coding, coverage and documentation.

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Getting the intermittent catheter the patient needs: considerations in coding, coverage and documentation.

Urol Nurs. 2013 Sep-Oct;33(5):257

Authors: Galinis J

PMID: 24354115 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

"There's an app for that" bringing nursing education to the bedside.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2014-01-29 02:09
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"There's an app for that" bringing nursing education to the bedside.

J Pediatr Nurs. 2013 Apr;28(2):191-2

Authors: Gregory LC, Lowder E, Issah F

Abstract
Although many educators may not consider themselves technologically savvy, the reality is that the use of technology in nursing education is sharply rising and we must meet the needs of the adult learner. Now more than ever, learners utilize technology for their daily lives and actually prefer this form of education. The use of iPads can greatly impact nursing education which not only engages the staff, but provides an environment that is conducive to learning, is cost effective, and fun. iPads really do have an app for that!

PMID: 23415720 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Informatics is considered a core competency for safe clinical practice.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2014-01-24 19:49
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Informatics is considered a core competency for safe clinical practice.

Alta RN. 2013;69(3):12

Authors: Kleib M, Shaben T, Zimka O, Kwan J, Alberta Nursing Informatics Group

PMID: 24288869 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Challenges and solutions for using informatics in research.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2014-01-17 04:17
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Challenges and solutions for using informatics in research.

West J Nurs Res. 2013 Jul;35(6):722-41

Authors: Ryan CJ, Choi H, Fritschi C, Hershberger PE, Vincent CV, Hacker ED, Zerwic JJ, Norr K, Park H, Tastan S, Keenan GM, Finnegan L, Zhao Z, Gallo AM, Wilkie DJ

Abstract
Computer technology provides innovations for research but not without concomitant challenges. Herein, we present our experiences with technology challenges and solutions across 16 nursing research studies. Issues included intervention integrity, software updates and compatibility, web accessibility and implementation, hardware and equipment, computer literacy of participants, and programming. Our researchers found solutions related to best practices for computer-screen design and usability testing, especially as they relate to the target populations' computer literacy levels and use patterns; changes in software; availability and limitations of operating systems and web browsers; resources for on-site technology help for participants; and creative facilitators to access participants and implement study procedures. Researchers may find this information helpful as they consider successful ways to integrate informatics in the design and implementation of future studies with technology that maximizes research productivity.

PMID: 23475591 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Nursing informatics competencies: assessment of undergraduate and graduate nursing students.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2014-01-16 01:14
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Nursing informatics competencies: assessment of undergraduate and graduate nursing students.

J Clin Nurs. 2013 Jul;22(13-14):1970-6

Authors: Choi J, De Martinis JE

Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To report the informatics competencies of students in selected undergraduate and graduate nursing programmes, to examine whether informatics competencies differed between the different programmes and to suggest competency-based applications that will strengthen informatics courses and informatics-related content throughout the curricula.
BACKGROUND: Nursing students in undergraduate and graduate nursing programmes have different educational backgrounds and different practice experience. Thus, their informatics preparation is apt to be varied, and nursing curricula must reflect this variation while advancing students towards informatics proficiency. However, studies on informatics competency assessment in these nursing students are scarce.
DESIGN: A descriptive survey design.
METHODS: Data were collected from 289 nursing students using a 30-item Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale via an email sent to students using a LISTSERV mailing list. The email embedded link to the Internet survey package, SurveyMonkey, which included the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale and demographic questions along with an online consent form.
RESULTS: Students in both programmes were competent in three subscale areas: basic computer knowledge and skills, clinical informatics attitude, and wireless device skills. Graduate students reported slightly higher mean competency scores than did undergraduate students in three subscales: clinical informatics role, clinical informatics attitude and wireless device skills.
CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate specific topics for nurse educators to consider when designing informatics curricula. The comparison of undergraduate and graduate students indicates similarities in informatics competencies in terms of areas where students were competent and small mean score differences. Further studies are suggested to examine whether there are differences in informatics competencies between undergraduate and graduate students.
RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: These results assist nurse educators in determining specific areas of informatics content that need greater focus and inclusion in the design of better nursing educational programmes. Examples of integrating competencies into existing curriculum or informatics courses are suggested.

PMID: 23745645 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Hospital and health information systems - Current perspectives. Contribution of the IMIA Health Information Systems Working Group.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2014-01-16 01:14
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Hospital and health information systems - Current perspectives. Contribution of the IMIA Health Information Systems Working Group.

Yearb Med Inform. 2011;6(1):73-82

Authors: Lovis C, Ball M, Boyer C, Elkin PL, Ishikawa K, Jaffe C, March A, Marin H, Mykkänen J, Rienhoff O, Silva J, Sittig DF, Talmon J

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To celebrate over 30 years of health information systems' (HIS) evolution by bringing together pioneers in the field, members of the next generation of leaders, and government officials from several developing nations in Africa to discuss the past, present, and future of HISs.
METHODS: Participants gathered in Le Franschhoek, South Africa for a 2 1/2 day working conference consisting of scientific presentations followed by several concurrent breakout sessions. A small writing group prepared draft statements representing their positions on various topics of discussion which were circulated and revised by the entire group.
RESULTS: Many new tools, techniques and technologies were described and discussed in great detail. Interestingly, all of the key themes identified in the first HIS meeting held over 30 years ago are still of vital importance today: Patient Centered design, Clinical User Support, Real-time Education, Human-computer Factors and Measuring Clinical User Performance, Meaningful use.
CONCLUSIONS: As we continue to work to develop next-generation HISs, we must remember the lessons of the past as we strive to develop the solutions for tomorrow.

PMID: 21938328 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Embracing new technology.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sun, 2014-01-12 21:57
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Embracing new technology.

Nurs N Z. 2013 Sep;19(8):4

Authors: Leov V, Hahn D

PMID: 24279044 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Data-analysis issues in a phenomenographic investigation of information literacy in nursing.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sun, 2014-01-12 21:57
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Data-analysis issues in a phenomenographic investigation of information literacy in nursing.

Nurse Res. 2013 Nov;21(2):30-4

Authors: Forster M

Abstract
AIM: To explore two contrasting methods of phenomenographic data analysis.
BACKGROUND: Phenomenography is a still-uncommon but increasingly used methodology based on qualitative interviews that allows experiences to be categorised and put into a descriptive structure for use in developing educational interventions. There are two different approaches in the literature to analysing data: the Marton and Åkerlind methods.
DATA SOURCES: A doctoral research project investigating the role of information literacy in evidence-based practice in nursing.
REVIEW METHODS: The phenomenographic study involves open-ended interviews in which participants are asked to describe their 'life-world' where the phenomenon is experienced, covering the contexts in which it is experienced and how it is experienced. The researcher attempts to develop statements from the interview transcripts that describe representative ways of experiencing the phenomenon in the form of 'categories of description'. A category of description represents a qualitatively different way of experiencing a phenomenon.
DISCUSSION: This article discusses the reasons for adopting phenomenography, phenomenography's epistemological assumptions, and the strengths and weaknesses of the two different data-analysis methods.
CONCLUSION: Phenomenography's strength is its ability to develop logical structures that give a picture of the experience of a phenomenon while being able to read into the structure as much of the complexity of that experience as is consciously and practically possible.
IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE/RESEARCH: One method, described as the 'Åkerlind' method, emerged as the appropriate method for phenomenographic studies in nursing.

PMID: 24171635 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Evaluating nurses' use of HOBIC in home care.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2014-01-03 12:24
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Evaluating nurses' use of HOBIC in home care.

Can J Nurs Res. 2013 Sep;45(3):92-114

Authors: Nagle LM, White P

Abstract
Health Outcomes for Better Information and Care (HOBIC), a program funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, introduces a collection of evidence-based clinical outcome measures reflective of nursing care. The authors report on an evaluation of the experiences of nurse early adopters of HOBIC in home care. The findings reveal challenges and nuances associated with the introduction of HOBIC and the use of supporting technologies in the delivery of home nursing care. Future implementation efforts should focus on optimizing the usability of technology and the usefulness of HOBIC in nursing practice. In addition, efforts need to be directed at supporting the full integration and use of HOBIC outcome data by nurses and management personnel to inform practice directions.

PMID: 24236374 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

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