Online learning update by Ray Schroeder

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Online Learning News and Research ~ Ray Schroeder, editor ~ University of Illinois at Springfield
Updated: 24 min 14 sec ago

Quality Of UNC Kenan-Flagler Lures MBAs From On-Site To Online — But Are We There Yet?

8 hours 8 min ago

by Adam Gordon, Forbes

MBA@UNC students are currently required at a three-day real-world event twice during their degree, choosing their date and location from a schedule of quarterly gathering in the U.S. and around the world. Recent locations were San Francisco, London, Shanghai, Detroit, and Budapest. But beyond this they can and do join residential students for part of their program, for example taking a traditional study-abroad option. And, as the online program garners quality recognition, residential students are asking to take classes on it. Through this, what is coming into focus is a user-oriented “hybrid” education offering where students choose from a portfolio of real-world and online options, making the best tradeoffs they can according to the kind of graduate or executive education experience they seek, or that their situation will allow.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/adamgordon/2016/04/25/unc-mba/#5fd776b4691a

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When Your Dream School Accepts You (But Only Online)

8 hours 10 min ago

by Chris Chafin, Fast Company

“It kind of fooled me at first,” Kinsella told me. “It said, ‘Congratulations, you’ve been admitted to the University of Florida.’ But shortly after, I discovered it was actually the ‘Path to Campus Enrollment.’ Is that what it’s called? The PaCE program.” Kinsella had been accepted to a year-old program at UF that lets students who don’t quite make the cut for traditional admission take their first two years of classes online or at a community college for a 25% discount in tuition. They can start taking classes on UF’s campus only after they earn 60 credits, and start as juniors. This combination of online and offline education is new, but gaining in popularity. Many institutions around the country, including the University of Colorado and , offer so-called hybrid degrees for bachelor’s or master’s students in many fields of study. This is all part of an expansion in online education that’s been progressing fitfully for most of this decade, an experiment involving millions of young people whose results are far from certain.

http://www.fastcompany.com/3057949/when-your-dream-school-accepts-you-but-only-online

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Micro master’s is future of online learning: Anant Agarwal

8 hours 12 min ago

by Anjuli Bhargava, Business Standard

I see the world becoming more unbundled, more micro – in everything. Learning is life long. As things stand, do you know that only 25 per cent of students in the US actually follow this model of going to college at 18 and finishing in four years ? Most of them take up a job after high school, some come back later, some join college and drop out. We have launched on edX a micro master’s. Why should you get a full master’s ? You can get micro credentials. Say you are doing a BA in Math. But you want to work as a computer programmer. You can take a micro master’s in programming from edX. By the time you have your BA in math, you can have your masters too and get a job in programming if you like. These new micro credentials are just-in-time learning in the right field. We think that is the future. We think in the future the concept of a degree will be questioned too. Why do we need a four year degree ? Why does India need a three year degree – 95 per cent who earn the degree can’t be employed in any case.

http://www.business-standard.com/article/economy-policy/micro-master-s-is-future-of-online-learning-anant-agarwal-116042000050_1.html

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CU system reaping the benefits of massive open online courses

Sun, 2016-05-01 02:05

By Sarah Kuta, Daily Camera

The University of Colorado is starting to see some revenue from the free, massive open online courses it offers to the world through the website Coursera. Though course content is still free, students are beginning to pay for certificates showing they’ve completed a CU course or a multi-course unit in the same subject. Since September, these online course certificates have generated roughly $110,000 across the CU system, a number that is likely to go up this spring with the launch of new multi-course units, said Deborah Keyek-Franssen, associate vice president for digital education and engagement for the CU system. That’s been somewhat of a welcome surprise, as CU did not necessarily expect to make money when it began offering the courses three years ago, Keyek-Franssen said.

http://www.dailycamera.com/cu-news/ci_29802803/cu-system-reaping-benefits-massive-open-online-courses

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What to Do When You’re Bored With Your Job

Sun, 2016-05-01 02:03

by Gloria Cordes Larson, Forbes

I believe it’s critical to commit to a lifetime of learning. Everyone needs to refresh their mind from time to time and learning new skills helps develop new talents that often lead to exciting new aspects of your career. As the leader of a university responsible for developing tomorrow’s leaders, I tell my graduating students that earning their degree is a tremendous accomplishment, but if they want to continue advancing then the learning doesn’t stop after graduation. Whether they plan to go on to obtain an advanced degree, they take online courses to learn the latest social media tools or brush up on the latest enterprise software, it’s critical to keep acquiring new skills.

http://fortune.com/2016/04/24/bored-with-job/

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What can higher ed learn about retention from the healthcare industry?

Sun, 2016-05-01 02:02

By Tara García Mathewson, Education Dive

In hospitals, population health management uses predictive analytics to separate patients into cohorts by risk level and assign supports accordingly, and some colleges are starting to look to the strategy as a model for addressing retention. Inside Higher Ed reports new research from EAB shows promising results for colleges that have organized their advising services based on the population health management model, in which about 70% of people are categorized as low risk, 25% as medium or rising risk, and 5% as high risk. Middle Tennessee State University implemented a new model based on the healthcare strategy in fall 2014, hiring more advisors and focusing their efforts on high-risk students, who were identified through analytics as those with low GPAs, and it saw a 3.4% increase in retention in one year.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/what-can-higher-ed-learn-about-retention-from-the-healthcare-industry/417779/

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Marketing could become the most expensive part of higher ed

Sat, 2016-04-30 02:06

By Tara García Mathewson, Education Dive

Colleges and universities are spending more money on recruitment to attract students in an increasingly competitive field, and Noodle Partners CEO John Katzman calls it an arms race in need of regulation. For Inside Higher Ed, Katzman writes that people are paying attention to the spending spree on campus amenities but not the runaway costs of student recruitment, which ultimately increases the cost of higher education without improving services for students. Katzman suggests a bill that would limit subsidized student loans to the actual cost of education or a new U.S. Department of Education regulation that would limit tuition sharing deals at schools whose marketing budgets get too high.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/marketing-could-become-the-most-expensive-part-of-higher-ed/417777/

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Supply is up in online ed but demand is down — now what?

Sat, 2016-04-30 02:05

By Tara García Mathewson, Education Dive

Higher education marketing is more competitive now than it has ever been before, and it’s only getting worse. Some 70% of chief academic officers say online education is going to be a key pillar of their institution’s strategy moving forward, and demand for online education programs is growing at a slower rate than at any point in the last 20 years. In a conversation about the growth potential of online higher education and the marketing challenges presented by modern competition, Cornell University’s Ashley Budd highlighted the concerns of enrollment professionals who have been trying to get around the shrinking population of traditional college-goers for years. But online education is a dangerous place to look for salvation, given the trendline of demand. “That’s really a scary reality,” Helix’s Seth Odell said. “If you’re turning to online education to solve an enrollment problem, it’s going to be a really difficult problem to solve.” There are now 450 online MBA programs competing for students.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/supply-is-up-in-online-ed-but-demand-is-down-now-what/417722/

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EdTech: Business Mooc Maker Udacity Is Embracing Blended Campus/Online Learning

Sat, 2016-04-30 02:03

by Seb Murray, Business Because

Udacity’s announcement marks the latest innovation among Mooc makers, which are increasingly moving beyond free courses with high drop-out rates and into paid-for, professional education. Udacity’s “Nanodegrees” are monetized. Coursera, a rival, runs “Specializations”, and charges users for certificates, and enrolment, to some courses. Online students are uploading certificates of competition to job sites like LinkedIn. And employers, such as Google, Amazon, and Adobe, are hiring them. “As more online degree recipients enter the workplace, and employers learn that many can perform as well as those with traditional degrees, the momentum to be more accepting of such programs grows,” said Patrick Mullane, executive director of HBX, Harvard Business School’s digital learning initiative. Educational leaders believe online learning is one way to close critical skills gaps, in areas such as data science and web development.

http://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-distance-learning/3926/udacity-embraces-blended-campus-online-learning

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The Price Is Still Right: 15 Sites for Free Digital Textbooks

Fri, 2016-04-29 02:10

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

“Open” has gone mainstream. The world now celebrates Open Education Week. The U.S. Department of Education announced an “Open Education” or #GoOpen initiative and ran its first “@GoOpen Exchange” to get schools and educators committed to the use of open educational resources (OER). Students at Ithaca College, The College of William & Mary and Santa Barbara City College are all pushing their schools to adopt OER. Multiple colleges and universities are trying out no/low-cost OER degree programs. Amazon looks to be getting into the OER business with “Inspire.” And a bipartisan group of Congressional staffers recently held a briefing to learn from experts why they should care about OER. The demand for free learning content may be loud and clear now, but, back in 2013 when Campus Technology first surveyed the top sources for free digital textbooks, the OER world seemed a quieter, less tweeted place. What hasn’t changed, though, is that faculty and students still want to know where to go to find the goods.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/04/20/the-price-is-still-right-15-sites-for-free-digital-textbooks.aspx

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OER in Higher Ed: ‘Huge Awareness-Raising Effort Needed’

Fri, 2016-04-29 02:05

By David Raths, Campus Technology

When it comes to open educational resources (OER) adoption, is the glass half empty or half full? On the one hand, more than 1 billion works have been licensed using Creative Commons since the organization was founded 15 years ago, and in 2015 alone Creative Commons-licensed works were viewed online 136 billion times. Yet awareness of OER in higher education remains low. Approximately 75 percent of faculty respondents to a 2014 Babson Survey Research Group study didn’t know about or couldn’t accurately define OER or why it is important. Changing that situation is the mission of Cable Green, director of open education at Creative Commons and a leading advocate for open policies that ensure publicly funded education materials are freely and openly available to the public. “We still have a huge awareness-raising effort that needs to be done,” said Green. “We all need to teach other people about what this is and why it is important.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/04/21/oer-in-higher-ed-huge-awareness-raising-effort-needed.aspx

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Employers, insurers see promise in self-directed online therapy

Fri, 2016-04-29 02:02

By Christopher Snowbeck, Star Tribune

Employers and a large health insurer are considering a new way of reaching people with social anxiety and depression. Many who suffer from social anxiety, depression and other mental health problems won’t seek help from a therapist. However, they may find a sense of community in online discussion groups and “anxiety blogs,” said Dale Cook, the chief executive and co-founder of Learn to Live, a Minneapolis-based start-up. The company sells access to online courses for people struggling with mental health issues, and touts its strategies for engaging with sufferers. “They’re looking for online resources because they don’t want to tell anyone, or they don’t have time to go” for face-to-face therapy, Cook said in an interview. “We’re able to identify places where sufferers go to commiserate and suffer together and say: Have you found anything that works?”

http://www.startribune.com/employers-insurers-see-promise-in-self-directed-online-therapy/376658941/

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Don’t Dismiss Georgia Tech’s $6,600 Online Master’s Degree

Thu, 2016-04-28 02:10

BY WILLIAM FENTON, PC Magazine

I’m not about to let my ideological reservations foreclose my curiosity, especially given that so many Online Master of Science Computer Science students praise the program. A $6,600 master’s degree in computer science with a 55 percent acceptance rate and no GRE entrance exam? It’s a seductive proposition for an undergraduate, to be sure. Since the Georgia Institute of Technology announced its Online Master of Science Computer Science degree—OMS CS, for short—in May 2013, the program has elicited wonder, enthusiasm, and trepidation. When you consider the age of students, the OMS CS program is older (33-34 years old) and more educated (more than 700 applicants have advanced degrees and more than 120 hold Ph.D. or terminal degrees). In this sense, the Georgia Tech online master’s program is more in line with ventures such as General Assembly, which enable professionals to advance skills and training.

http://in.pcmag.com/coursera/102725/opinion/dont-dismiss-georgia-techs-6600-online-masters-deg

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ASU’s Global Freshman Academy Taps Adaptive Software for Math Students

Thu, 2016-04-28 02:05

By Rhea Kelly, Campus Technology

Arizona State University’s online Global Freshman Academy (GFA) is rolling out adaptive software to help tens of thousands of students work through its College Algebra & Problem Solving course. The GFA program, delivered via massive open online course (MOOC) provider edX, will be the first to utilize McGraw-Hill Education’s ALEKS adaptive learning product in a MOOC format. “To date, more than 17,800 students from 186 countries have registered for the College Algebra & Problem Solving course using the ALEKS program, which will provide students with individualized learning and instruct them on the topics they are most ready to learn,” according to a press release from McGraw-Hill Education.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/04/18/asus-global-freshman-academy-taps-adaptive-software-for-math-students.aspx

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University of Colorado contemplates 3-year, fully online degree programs

Thu, 2016-04-28 02:02

BY SARAH KUTA, DAILY CAMERA

The University of Colorado is asking its faculty and staff to get creative and develop new, fully online degree programs to launch in the fall of 2018. The CU system is calling for online degree program proposals until July 15, with grants being awarded by Sept. 30. CU hopes to select three winning grant proposals and award each team $200,000 for course development. Faculty selected for the grant will receive a $15,000 stipend, with staff members receiving a $5,000 stipend to support the logistics of course development. Students must be able to complete the degree completely online and in three calendar years, though they won’t be required to work within that time frame.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/university-3-online/

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Udacity Debuts In China, Launches In-Person Group Tutoring

Wed, 2016-04-27 02:09

by Kathleen Chaykowski ,FORBES

After launching in India last year, Udacity has made its way to China. The Mountain View, Calif-based online education company, cofounded about four years ago by Google GOOGL -5.53% X founder and Stanford University research professor Sebastian Thrun, is opening offices in China and making more than 100 of its free online courses available to anyone in China under the domain name youdaxue.com, the company said this week. On Wednesday, the company also announced it is launching its first in-person, instructor-led study sessions for students in its “Nanodegree” programs, which cover topics from iOS and Android development to machine learning and require students to complete a series of projects.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/kathleenchaykowski/2016/04/21/udacity-debuts-in-china-launches-in-person-group-tutoring/#586d9c9d4bd0

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More UK adults taking online courses

Wed, 2016-04-27 02:04

By Anthony Spadafora, Beta News

Adults in the UK are turning to online learning platforms in order to stay competitive in their fields and to learn new skills, despite their increasingly busy schedules. Coursera, which offers online courses from some of the top universities worldwide, has noticed that the number of new users registering for its educational platform has increased by 50 percent over the course of the past 12 months. In the UK, the company has over half a million users that are registered for a variety of courses. Coursera has noted that of those currently studying, 30 percent are using their smartphones to access their courses, which illustrates the flexibility of studying online.

http://betanews.com/2016/04/21/uk-online-courses

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Higher Ed in 2023

Wed, 2016-04-27 02:02
by Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed Higher ed nerds throughout the land rejoiced last week at the release of The National Center’s for Education Statistics report Projections of Education Statistics to 2023. http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2015073 Some stats from Josh’s summary: Postsecondary Enrollment Growth Is Slowing:   Traditional Age Student Enrollment Is Slowing:   The Number of Older Students (25+) Is Growing:  By 2023, over 10.3 million students will be over 25. Part-Time Students Are Growing Faster Than Full-Time:  Between 2012 and 2023 the number of part-time students will increase by 18 percent, compared to only 14 percent for full-time. Graduate Enrollments Increasing Faster Than Undergraduate:  The number of students enrolled in graduate programs will increase by 25 percent between 2012 and 2023, compared to an increase of 14 percent for undergraduates.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/higher-ed-2023

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Berkeley chancellor, Stanford president kick off online-learning summit

Tue, 2016-04-26 02:10

By Public Affairs, UC Berkeley

Online courses may not have overwhelmed undergraduate education in a disruptive “tsunami,” as once predicted. But teaching and learning technology is “going to change the landscape of everything we do,” UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks told an audience at Stanford University on Friday. Dirks made that prediction in conversation with Stanford president John Hennessy, kicking off the fourth annual “learning summit,” held this year on the Stanford campus. “We’ve seen that online resources can be very important,” Dirks said. “But at the same time they don’t substitute for being there” – for personal contact with faculty or the sense of community that residential undergraduate institutions provide. So far, he added, MOOCs have been “most spectacularly successful for students who have graduated.” Hennessy concurred, observing that massive open online courses (MOOCs) have gotten their greatest traction among professionals already working in their field.

https://news.berkeley.edu/2016/04/18/berkeley-chancellor-stanford-president-kick-off-online-learning-summit/

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Is demand high enough for CBE expansion?

Tue, 2016-04-26 02:05

By Tara García Mathewson, Education Dive

University Ventures Managing Director Ryan Craig and eLumen CEO Joel Hernandez write for TechCrunch that the rise of CBE programs, which have thus far inspired minimal demand from students, may be like smartphones that needed apps to take off after the iOS and Android operating systems were already created. CBE programs’ “clickable credentials” will create unprecedented access for employers and graduate school admissions officers to see the actual skills of graduates, the programs will prove the value-added element of college that is now somewhat obscure, and career services departments may be able to develop ways to market their students to prospective employers by specific, proven skillsets. Craig and Hernandez add CBE programs will greatly help the problem of remediation, with tailored curricula designed to teach students chosen competencies as well as supporting skills through remedial content.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/is-demand-high-enough-for-cbe-expansion/417685/

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