NLM - Nursing terminology and classification

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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=("Terminology"[MeSH] OR "Vocabulary, Controlled"[MeSH] OR "Classification"[MeSH]) AND "Nursing"[MeSH]
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Contributions of the nurse's clinical practice to Primary Care.

Tue, 2019-06-25 13:02
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Contributions of the nurse's clinical practice to Primary Care.

Rev Bras Enferm. 2019 Mar-Apr;72(2):354-359

Authors: Kahl C, Meirelles BHS, Cunha KSD, Bernardo MDS, Erdmann AL

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To understand the repercussions of the nurse's clinical practice on Primary Health Care.
METHOD: Qualitative research with the theoretical and methodological contribution of Grounded Theory. Data collection took place between May and October 2016 in Florianópolis' Primary Care service. The theoretical sample was comprised of 18 nurses divided into two groups.
RESULTS: nurses' clinical practice has repercussions on the consolidation of the trust bond between individuals, families and communities, by amplifying the problem-solving efficacy of the Primary Health Care professional's clinical practice. This is due to the implementation of clinical nursing protocols, and also the use of the International Classification for Nursing Practice.
FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: Nurses' clinical practice has positive repercussions on the health of Primary Health Care users.

PMID: 31017196 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Psychiatric Aeromedical Evacuations of Deployed Active Duty U.S. Military Personnel During Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn.

Fri, 2019-06-14 15:54
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Psychiatric Aeromedical Evacuations of Deployed Active Duty U.S. Military Personnel During Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn.

Mil Med. 2018 11 01;183(11-12):e649-e658

Authors: Peterson AL, Hale WJ, Baker MT, Cigrang JA, Moore BA, Straud CL, Dukes SF, Young-McCaughan S, Gardner CL, Arant-Daigle D, Pugh MJ, Williams Christians I, Mintz J, STRONG STAR Consortium

Abstract
Introduction: The primary objective of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical, and attrition characteristics of active duty U.S. military service members who were aeromedically evacuated from Iraq and Afghanistan theaters with a psychiatric condition as the primary diagnosis. The study links the U.S. Transportation Command Regulating and Command and Control Evacuation System (TRAC2ES) data with the Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC) to conduct an examination of the long-term occupational impact of psychiatric aeromedical evacuations on military separations and discharges.
Materials and Methods: Retrospective analyses were conducted on the demographic, clinical, and attrition information of active duty service members (N = 7,023) who received a psychiatric aeromedical evacuation from Iraq or Afghanistan between 2001 and 2013 using TRAC2ES data. Additionally, TRAC2ES database was compared with DMDC data to analyze personal and service demographics, aeromedical evacuation information, and reasons for military separation with the entire 2013 active duty force. Chi-square tests of independence and standardized residuals were used to identify cells with observed frequencies or proportions significantly different than expected by chance. Additionally, OR were calculated to provide context about the nature of any significant relationships.
Results: Compared with the active duty comparison sample, those with a psychiatric aeromedical evacuation tended to be younger, female, white, divorced or widowed, and less educated. They were also more likely to be junior enlisted service members in the Army serving in a Combat Arms military occupational specialty. The primary psychiatric conditions related to the aeromedical evacuation were depressive disorders (25%), adjustment disorders (18%), post-traumatic stress disorder (9%), bipolar disorders (6%), and anxiety disorders (6%). Approximately, 3% were evacuated for suicidal ideation and associated behaviors. Individuals who received a psychiatric aeromedical evacuation were almost four times as likely (53%) to have been subsequently separated from active duty at the time of the data analysis compared with other active duty service members (14%). The current study also found that peaks in the number of aeromedical evacuations coincided with significant combat operational events. These peaks almost always preceded or followed a significant operational event. An unexpected finding of the present study was that movement classification code was not predictive of subsequent reasons for separation from the military. Thus, the degree of clinical supervision and restraint of a service member during psychiatric aeromedical evacuation from deployment proved to be unrelated to subsequent service outcome.
Conclusions: Psychiatric conditions are one of the leading reasons for the aeromedical evacuation of active duty military personnel from the military combat theater. For many active duty military personnel, a psychiatric aeromedical evacuation from a combat theater is the start of a military career-ending event that results in separation from active duty. This finding has important clinical and operational implications for the evaluation and treatment of psychiatric conditions during military deployments. Whenever possible, deployed military behavioral health providers should attempt to treat psychiatric patients in theater to help them remain in theater to complete their operational deployments. Improved understanding of the factors related to psychiatric aeromedical evacuations will provide important clinical and policy implications for future conflicts.

PMID: 30124915 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

A crosswalk between the Omaha System and guiding undergraduate public health nursing education documents.

Wed, 2019-05-22 12:39
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A crosswalk between the Omaha System and guiding undergraduate public health nursing education documents.

Public Health Nurs. 2019 03;36(2):215-225

Authors: Stalter AM, Harrington S, Eardley DL, DeBlieck CJ, Blanchette LP, Whitten L

Abstract
The Omaha System is the hallmark evidence-based clinical information management system used in nursing education, research, and practice. Multiple education documents guide public health workforce preparation. This qualitative study identified similarities and gaps between the Omaha System and seven guiding documents commonly used by nurse educators. A crosswalk design was employed. The setting was virtually based using online technology. Recommendations are for public health nurse educators to update their teaching practices using evidence-based approaches.

PMID: 30680792 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Feasibility of describing community strengths relative to Omaha system concepts.

Wed, 2019-05-22 12:39
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Feasibility of describing community strengths relative to Omaha system concepts.

Public Health Nurs. 2019 03;36(2):245-253

Authors: Kerr MJ, Gargantua-Aguila SDR, Glavin K, Honey MLL, Nahcivan NO, Secginli S, Martin KS, Monsen KA

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose was to determine the feasibility of using a standardized language, the Omaha System, to describe community-level strengths. The objectives were: (a) to evaluate the feasibility of using the Omaha System at the community level to reflect community strengths and (b) to describe preliminary results of community strengths observations across international settings.
DESIGN AND SAMPLE: A descriptive qualitative design was used. The sample was a data set of 284 windshield surveys by nursing students in 5 countries: Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Turkey, and the United States.
MEASURES: An online survey included a checklist and open-ended questions on community strengths for 11 concepts of the Omaha System Problem Classification Scheme: Income, Sanitation, Residence, Neighborhood/workplace safety, Communication with community resources, Social contact, Interpersonal relationship, Spirituality, Nutrition, Substance use, and Health care supervision. Themes were derived through content analysis of responses to the open-ended questions.
RESULTS: Feasibility was demonstrated: Students were able to use the Omaha System terms and collect data on strengths. Common themes were described among the five countries.
CONCLUSIONS: The Omaha System appears to be useful in documenting community-level strengths. Themes and exemplar quotes provide a first step in developing operational definitions of strengths at a more granular level.

PMID: 30488544 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Using the Omaha System to determine health problems of urban Syrian immigrants.

Wed, 2019-05-22 12:39
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Using the Omaha System to determine health problems of urban Syrian immigrants.

Public Health Nurs. 2019 03;36(2):126-133

Authors: Ardic A, Esin MN, Koc S, Bayraktar B, Sunal N

Abstract
OBJECTIVE(S): This study assessed the health problems of Syrian immigrants living in urban areas using the Omaha System.
DESIGN: A descriptive and observational study was conducted in Istanbul.
SAMPLE: The sample included 51 Syrian immigrant families and 248 Syrian refugees.
MEASURES: Data were collected using the Omaha System-Problem Classification List and a sociodemographic questionnaire.
RESULTS: The average household size was 6.36; 71% of those over the age of 18 were not employed. Only 8.5% of children aged 0-15 were vaccinated; 15 nursing problems and 46 signs and symptoms were diagnosed using the Problem Classification List scale. Personal care was the most frequently diagnosed problem, followed by Sanitation, Communication with community resources, Mental health, and Residence.
CONCLUSIONS: Health and social problems are common Syrian immigrants living in urban areas. The Omaha System-Problem Classification List can be used as a tool by public health nurses to identify health problems encountered by immigrants.

PMID: 30467898 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

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