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Tag der Epilepsie unter dem Motto: "Epilepsie kann jeden treffen - in jedem Alter" am

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Fri, 2014-10-03 00:00
Ausgewählte Informationen zum Tag der Epilepsie unter dem Motto: "Epilepsie kann jeden treffen - in jedem Alter" am 05.10.2014
Categories: Science News

Does job success depend on data rather than your CV?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2014-10-02 22:41
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Matthew Wall, Oct 02, 2014

I have written recently about alternative modes of assessments and credentials. This story feeds intot hat trend. "A number of firms are moving beyond automatic keyword matching to find 'suitable' candidates... for example, recruitment technology firm Electronic Insight doesn't even bother to look at your skills and experience when analysing CVs on behalf of clients. 'We just look at what people write and how they structure their sentences,' says Marc Mapes, the firm's chief innovation officer."

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Tech Advances Fuel LMS Identity Crisis

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2014-10-02 22:41


Benjamin Herold, Oct 02, 2014

Things are getting confusing again. "A slew of vendors— many of which eschew the 'learning management system' moniker altogether in favor of terms such as 'virtual learning platform'— are competing aggressively to establish their software as the best available tool to help schools offer more-personalized instruction."

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College is ripping you off: Students are cash cows, and schools the predators

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2014-10-02 16:40
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Thomas Frank, Salon, Oct 02, 2014

Another in the ongoing series of articles ripping into the college and university business model. "One day we wake up to discover there is no Santa Claus. Somehow, we have been had. We are a hundred thousand dollars in debt, and there is no clear way to escape it. We have no prospects to speak of. And if those damned dreams of ours happened to have taken a particularly fantastic turn and urged us to get a PhD, then the learning really begins. Meanwhile, the last of the German tuition fees are being abolished, ending an experiment in social injustice that began a number of years ago. And  a study that shows "even relative low levels of tuition fees of around 1,000 euros per year are likely to deter students from lower socio-economic backgrounds from studying."

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The myths about Canada’s skills gap

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2014-10-02 16:40
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Chris Sorensen, MacLean's, Oct 02, 2014

Reasonably coherent article about the skills shortage in Canada. Here's the first major data point: “ There are increasing calls by employers for educators to do more job-ready training. But these calls have been increasing at the same time employers’ spending on training has been dropping.” Why would this be? "A sort of workplace prisoner’ s dilemma: Why spend thousands improving an employee’ s skills only to have him or her poached by a hungry competitor?" That's why our focus is on personal learning, while looking for industry support. By creating a learning network we avoid the prisoner's dilemma, thereby creating a means whereby employers can invest in training, not simply as an on-the-job tool, but also as a recruiting tool.

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New movement in learning analytics could change education

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Thu, 2014-10-02 02:10

By Meris Stansbury, eCampus News

Stanford calls for education data science field; presents national road map to analytics success. In a truly comprehensive report, with advice and suggestions from over 800 teachers and administrators, a Stanford-led national Workgroup calls for a new movement in learning analytics—redefining the field and offering a seemingly scalable road map to success. The Workgroup, report, and road map were developed, because as Roy Pea, the David Jacks Professor of Education and Learning Sciences at the Stanford Graduate School of Education and lead investigator of the report, explains: the technology behind analytics has progressed faster than education’s ability to use it.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/data-learning-analytics-984/

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An Insufficient Census

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Thu, 2014-10-02 02:06

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

The federal government’s long-awaited data on the students enrolled in distance education courses nationwide provide a dubious baseline, a new study suggests, as confusing instructions, inflexible design and a lack of coordination have led colleges and universities to under- or overreport thousands of students. The study, conducted by the WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies and the higher education consultant Phil Hill, raises serious questions about the integrity of the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, or IPEDS, the higher education data collection program operated by the Education Department’s National Center for Education Statistics.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/09/26/ipeds-survey-misses-thousands-online-students-often-counts-too-many

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Experts Say Class Size Can Matter for Online Students

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Thu, 2014-10-02 02:02

by Devon Haynie, US News

Class sizes can vary widely in online education, where enrollment is not limited by the constraints of a physical classroom. Massive open online courses, which some students can now take for credit, can contain thousands of students. Among the 187 ranked online bachelor’s programs that submitted data to U.S. News in 2013, meanwhile, average class size ranged from one to 150. The research behind class size in an online environment is inconclusive, says Kay Shattuck, director of research with Quality Matters, a nonprofit that helps universities and others design effective online courses. Still, plenty of experts believe that class size matters, and urge online students to think carefully about the size of their online classrooms before signing up for a course or a degree.

http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/articles/2014/09/26/experts-say-class-size-can-matter-for-online-students

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Zwergstern lässt es krachen

ScienceTicker.Info - Wed, 2014-10-01 15:01
Klein, aber oho: Ein amerikanischer Forschungssatellit hat eine Serie von Eruptionen auf einem Zwergstern beobachtet, die teils um den Faktor 10.000 intensiver waren als das stärkste bekannte Gegenstück auf der Sonne. Lesen Sie mehr bei Scienceticker Astro
Categories: Science News

German universities face funding fears as states scrap fees

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2014-10-01 13:38
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Alexandra Topping, The Guardian, Oct 01, 2014

Leading the opposition to ongoing plans to eliminate tuition fees in Germany are - wait for it - universities. Dr Holger Fischer, vice-president of Hamburg University, said: "It is a catastrophe for the university." The coverage in this Guardian article is no less apocalyptic. "The German university fee system is on the brink of collapse," it reports breathlessly. From where I sit, it looks like a social democratic government actually following the principles it campaigned on (other left-leaning parties should take note). "Tuition fees keep young people from low-income families from studying and are socially disruptive." The trend toward the elimination of tuition fees in Germany is a good thing, and should be celebrated.

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Learning in an Introductory Physics MOOC: All Cohorts Learn Equally, Including an On-Campus Class

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2014-10-01 13:38
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Kimberly F Colvin, John Champaign, Alwina Liu, Qian Zhou, Colin Fredericks, David E Pritchard, International Review of Research in Open, Distance Learning (IRRODL), Oct 01, 2014

Ouch: "In spite of the extra instruction that the on-campus students had," reports this study, there is "no evidence of positive, weekly relative improvement of our on-campus students compared with our online students." So, according to this study, MOOC students learn just as well as in-class students. Which raises the question of why, exactly, we would force students to go through the unnecessary time and expense of in-class participation.

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JSTOR, Daily

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2014-10-01 13:38
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Colleen Flaherty, Inside Higher Ed, Oct 01, 2014

Although I'm the first to support increasing the accessibility of scientific research, every time I think of JSTOR I think of the persecution of Aaron Swartz, so when JSTOR announces it is launching "content a little more digestible and to engage a different kind of audience" in the form of " JSTOR Daily. The slick-looking home page already features some 100 blog posts and original articles," I wonder what the catch is. And the catch, I suppose, is that most of "the world’ s knowledge" is locked behin a subscription wall, and JSTOR Daily just becomes, in effect, advertising for that.

OK, in fairness, the articles are really well written and the content is interesting and engaging. I looked at the most recent half dozen and checked the references and all the JSTOR articles, though dated, were accessible even from my non-subscription home desktop. I'm definitely subscribing (O love general interest publications like this). So maybe my prejudices can be overcome.

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How Diversity Makes Us Smarter

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2014-10-01 04:38
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Katherine W. Phillips, Scientific American, [Sept] 30, 2014

I have frequently cited diversity as one of the key ingredients of network design. This is not an arbitrary choice; emergence is not possible without diversity. So it's not surprising to see articles like this pointing to how diversity makes us (ie., society) smarter. "Diversity enhances creativity. It encourages the search for novel information and perspectives, leading to better decision making and problem solving." The lesson to draw from this is that diversity is equally important in learning. "This is how diversity works: by promoting hard work and creativity; by encouraging the consideration of alternatives even before any interpersonal interaction takes place. The pain associated with diversity can be thought of as the pain of exercise."

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Datapalooza

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2014-10-01 04:38
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Jose Ferreira, Adaptive Learning in ELT, [Sept] 30, 2014

Knewton's sales representative, Jose Ferreira, is making some big claims. "We literally have more data about our students than any company has about anybody else about anything, and it’ s not even close.... We literally know everything about what you know and how you learn best, everything." Except, responds Philop Kerr, it's not that simple. "The basic premise here," he writes, "is that the more data you have, the more accurately you can predict what will work best for any individual learner" But is this true? Not without good theory. "Knewton’ s claim that they know how every student learns best is marketing hyperbole and should set alarm bells ringing." Moreover, I would add, it should set everyone's  privacy alarm bells ringing. Do we  really want textbook publishers to know everything about us?

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Education at a Glance 2014

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2014-10-01 04:38
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OECD, OECD, [Sept] 30, 2014

This is a comprehensive compendium of mostly authoritative statistics and data related to education in a selected set of OECD and developing nations. I spent a good hour this morning reading various charts, but think that if you want the best quick summary it's best to read the editorial (pp. 13-15) because while the story it tells is a familiar one, it is underlined in urgency as social mobility decreases and income disparities increase. While young people are better educated than their older peers, the levels of education required for employment are rising even more rapidly. This is not just a social justice issue. "The increasing social divide between the educational 'haves' and 'have-nots' – and the risks that the latter are excluded from the social benefits of educational expansion – threatens societies as a whole." The report covers attainment level by country, the influence of parents' education, the effect of education on participation in the labour market, advantages from education, investment in education, teachers' salaries, education spending and demographics. See also  the supporting website for the report.

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Why Academics Stink at Writing

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2014-10-01 04:38
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Steven Pinker, The Chronicle of Higher Education, [Sept] 30, 2014

"Fog comes easily to writers," writes Steven Pinker, "it’ s the clarity that requires practice." I completely agree. In this article bemoaning the obscurity of academic writing and offering some possible causes for the phenomenon, Pinker hits the nail on the head over and over again. I am not a Pinker fan, but this article may just make me one. Who cares about the nature of cognition, if we can agree on the problems with academic writing?!? " Even scientists, with their commitment to seeing the world as it is, are a bit postmodern.... It’ s just that good writers don’ t flaunt that anxiety in every passage they write; they artfully conceal it for clarity’ s sake."

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Why Free Online Classes Are Still the Future of Education

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Wed, 2014-10-01 02:08

BY ISSIE LAPOWSKY, Wired

The MOOC was The Next Big Thing—and then it was written off for dead. But for Anant Agarwal, one of the founding fathers of this online reboot of university education, it’s only just getting started. The way he sees it, effective uses of the MOOC model are only beginning to take shape. Enrollment in edX courses has doubled over last year, and he believes we’re on the verge of an era he calls MOOC 2.0. Such optimism is to be expected from a man who makes his livelihood from this model. But Agarwal isn’t alone in this opinion. This week, a team of researchers out of MIT, Harvard, and China’s Tsinghua University—all schools that offer MOOCs—released a study showing that students who attended a MIT physics class online learned as effectively as students who took the class in person. What’s more, the results were the same, regardless of how well the online students scored on a pre-test before taking the class.

http://www.wired.com/2014/09/free-online-classes-still-future-education/

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Forget the MBA

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Wed, 2014-10-01 02:06

by Ronald Alsop, BBC

When Luis Ochoa wanted to make the leap from investment banking analyst to corporate strategist, he didn’t follow the usual path of getting a master’s of business administration degree. Instead, the Stanford University graduate took a few free strategy and financial accounting classes on Coursera, one of the major providers of so-called MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses), which have grown in popularity globally over the past few years. “I gained a foundation with those courses that helped me transition into corporate strategy” at Oppenheimer Funds, the 29-year-old New Yorker said. “Now, I’m not interested in an MBA because I’m where I want to be.” “We still get questions from companies about how good MOOCs are, but we’re finding that businesses are more and more willing to consider them to help fill skill gaps,” said Sebastian Thrun, chief executive of the MOOC platform Udacity, based in Mountain View, California.

http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20140925-forget-the-mba

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‘Going’ (But Not Going) to College

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Wed, 2014-10-01 02:04

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

How do you tell high school students they’re going to attend — but not actually go to — college? It’s a conversation the University of Florida is having with potential students, parents and school counselors about UF Online, the institution’s degree-granting online arm. Now facing its first full academic year, UF Online is hitting its course development and enrollment targets, but it has so far attracted few first-time-in-college (FTIC) students. UF Online launched in January with 583 students — all of them transferring in. In March, university officials said they hoped to enroll 750 to 1,000 students by the fall semester, including 100 to 150 high school graduates starting as freshmen.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/09/25/u-florida-online-considers-how-sell-studying-online-high-school-graduates

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Move Fast and Break Things

xkcd.com - Wed, 2014-10-01 02:00
Categories: Cartoons, Science News

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