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Bridging nursing's digital generation gap.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Fri, 2015-04-10 13:47
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Bridging nursing's digital generation gap.

Nurs Manage. 2014 Apr;45(4):12-4

Authors: Reinbeck DM, Fitzsimons V

PMID: 24662541 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

GNU social: Federation against the social model of Twitter

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2015-04-10 13:46
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Manuel Ortega, Las Indias in English, Apr 10, 2015

I haven't seen GNU Social but it might be worth looking it, as it offers a networking model more akin to the one I favour. "The Facebook and Twitter socialization model, the FbT model, is like a large plaza where everyone can shout their slogans, while barely listening to each other," says this article, which can be contrasted to (what it called) the federation model, in which "the intimate relationship between the value of a conversation and the trust that has already been established within the nodes. It is a consequence of the distributed structure of GNU social. Thanks to it, GNU social is free of any recentralizing tendencies." This is the approach we're taking in LPSS (and why your experience in  LPSS.me doesn't being with 'friending' a whole bunch of people). Via Dante-Gabryell Monson.

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Wake Forest University will offer online classes this summer

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2015-04-10 02:09

by Alana Harrison, Old Gold & Black

Wake Forest University has developed its first online courses and will begin offering them during summer 2015. These online courses are an alternative for summer school, as they can be taken from home, rather than require the student to be on campus.This greatly decreases the price for summer courses, because students will not have to pay for housing. Brenda Knox, director of online education, says this is a major reason why Wake Forest has developed some online courses. “The university would like to offer some alternatives to students who can’t stay on campus in the summer,” she said.

http://oldgoldandblack.com/?p=45108

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Online courses prep tomorrow’s leaders

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2015-04-10 02:05

By Valerie Sweeten, Houston Chronicle

According to www.onlinecolleges.org, students looking to pursue degrees online can find courses at every level, from an associate to a doctorate degree at both private and public institutions. Jeff Morgan, associate provost for education innovation and technology at the University of Houston, said that the campus has had a year-over-year increase in online student credit hours. In fall 2014 there was a 23 percent increase, with a 17 percent increase in spring 2015. Across their entire University of Houston System, there has been a year-over-year increase in both fall 2014 and spring 2015.

http://www.chron.com/jobs/article/Online-courses-prep-tomorrow-s-leaders-6177143.php

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Learning online offers many financial benefits

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2015-04-10 02:03
By Jan Burns, Houston Chronicle Though not all online programs have less expensive tuition than traditional schools, the associated costs can be lower. “The financial benefits of enrolling in online programs at universities is that students do not have to pay commuting expenses, may not need additional child care, and most likely will be able to continue in their current employment while in school as they can manage their own schedule and do their coursework around their families and work obligations,” said Vickie S. Cook, Ph.D., director, Center for Online Learning, research and service/research associate professor, University of Illinois at Springfield.

http://www.chron.com/jobs/article/Learning-online-offers-many-financial-benefits-6177193.php

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Napoleon

xkcd.com - Fri, 2015-04-10 02:00
Categories: Cartoons, Science News

Volkswirtschaftliche Gesamtrechnungen

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Fri, 2015-04-10 00:00

Die im Informationssystem eingespeicherte gestaltbare Tabelle aus dem Bereich "Volkswirtschaftliche Gesamtrechnungen " des Statistischen Bundesamtes wurde rückwirkend für alle Jahre aktualisiert und um das Jahr 2014 ergänzt.

Categories: Science News

Machine Learning Algorithm Mines 16 Billion E-Mails

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2015-04-09 22:46
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Press Release, MIT Technology review, Apr 09, 2015

I'll leave aside the question of where they got 16 billion emails and pause for a moment to ponder the implications of this: "Human e-mailing behavior is so predictable that computer scientists have created an algorithm that can calculate when an e-mail thread is about to end." (I really thing 'created' is the wrong word here - I think the appropriate word is 'found'.) If we're that predictable, what does it say about us? It used to be that one of the major objections to causal theories of the world was the apparent phenomenon of free will. But suppose the data tells us it's just an illusion. If - if they can tell us when an email thread is about to end, is there any way to telling us whether anyone learned anything from it? See the full report here.

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The 60,000 Times Faster Claim Gets Dialed Back to 1982

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2015-04-09 22:46
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Alan Levine, CogDogBlog, Apr 09, 2015

Have you heard this? "We can process visuals 60,000 times faster than text?" In my own mind I would question it right away because of its overt employment of a computer metaphor to talk about cognition, which to me is prima facie questionable. But Alan Levine actually looks for the source of the quote. He traces it back to an unreferenced claim made in a Business Week advertising section in 1982, attributing it to Philip Cooper, president of Computer Pictures Corporation. Philip Cooper is still around, but hasn't responded yet to Levine's enquiries. And me, what I wonder is, just how much mythology was created over the years by the business and advertising press? Possibly the bulk of what people today call 'common sense' was at one time or another someone's ad copy.

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The Math Ceiling: Where’s your cognitive breaking point?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2015-04-09 22:46
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Ben Orlin, Math With Bad Drawings, Apr 09, 2015

"A student who can answer questions without understanding them is a student with an expiration date." You'll understand. Good discussion of the question of whether there is some mathematical knowledge that is beyond the innate 'limit' of students, or whether every student is (theoretically) able to master every mathematical concept. The disclaimer in the blog ("I can't draw") also makes me wonder whether there's an art ceiling.

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Los Angeles Police Department taught the Canadian way when it comes to using force

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2015-04-09 22:46
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Kim Brunhuber, CBC News, Apr 09, 2015

What's interesting is not that the Los Angeles police are now using training methods employed by the RCMP, but rather, the manner in which training is now being conducted: "When I went through the academy,  everything was compartmentalized... Now, recruits are trained the same way they operate in the field: in teams. Training the whole person rather than training on a specific task, training so that the constitutional policing and use-of-force policy and all the things that are important to the public are contained in every exercise and everyone is graded accordingly." Cadets are run through a simulator which runs through a variety of simulators. The instructors watch the cadets' performance. ""I'm not going to tell you what to do... (if you) understand policy, they will be the one to make that decision when and if to use deadly force."

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Marketing: Avoiding Influencers Enmeshed By Spam Networks

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2015-04-09 16:46
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Walter Adamson, Kinship Digital, Apr 09, 2015

This is a good indication of why you can't just use numbers like frequency of connections and citations to understand the role and influence of someone in a community. This post is an analysis of the network of influencers in the recent Cricket World Cup (congrats to Australia). Many influencers, like celebrities and newspapers, are "context-free", because they appear everywhere, and have no particular connection to the community. Another group of influencers are more densely linked to each other than to the wider community. Finally, there is a group of apparent influencers who have bought lists of followers, thereby linking the genuine community to a collection of interlinked spammers. None of these three groups are genuine influencers, though you would not know this looking only at the numbers. Via Gavin Heaton.

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Starbucks and Arizona State U. Will Expand Tuition-Discount Partnership

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Thu, 2015-04-09 02:08
By Goldie Blumenstyk, Chronicle of Higher Ed Starbucks and Arizona State University announced on Monday that they will expand the full benefits of their tuition-discounting partnership to include Starbucks employees who have not yet accrued 60 college credits. ASU’s president, Michael M. Crow, said they were doing so because of continuing demand and the success of the initial program — since the summer, about 3,400 Starbucks employees submitted completed applications, 3,000 were accepted, and nearly 2,000 enrolled. Under the arrangement, the university provides a guaranteed scholarship — effectively a tuition discount — to all Starbucks students who attend ASU Online. The students are also eligible for federal Pell Grants and need-based financial aid from the university. Starbucks reimburses employees for the remaining amounts not covered by the discounts and federal financial aid. (Initially it did so every time students finished 21 credits. It now will provide the reimbursements after each semester.)

http://chronicle.com/article/StarbucksArizona-State-U/229127/

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3 Ways You Can Use Nontraditional Education to Win the War for talent

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Thu, 2015-04-09 02:06
by  Barry Salzberg,  Fast Company Approximately 70% of those currently pursuing an undergraduate degree in the U.S. are not doing so in what is thought of as the “traditional” college experience, according to the U.S. Education Department. Rather than studying full-time while living on a college campus and earning a degree after four years, they are studying part-time, withdrawing from college to work, and then returning later in life. Because of these changes, businesses need to expand how they approach finding future employees, hiring them, retaining them, and developing them. Here are some approaches they should consider:

http://www.fastcompany.com/3044622/3-ways-you-can-use-nontraditional-education-to-win-the-war-for-talent

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PAR Framework Partners with American Institutes for Research

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Thu, 2015-04-09 02:02
By Leila Meyer, Campus Technology The Predictive Analytics Reporting (PAR) Framework has partnered with the American Institutes for Research (AIR) in an effort to develop new metrics and measurements to help guide national policies related to higher education outcomes. The PAR Framework is an independent, non-profit provider of learner analytics as a service, and AIR is a behavioral and social science research and evaluation organization. According to the PAR Framework, the metrics currently used to compare higher education institutions in the United States are based on traditional models of education and don’t reflect the current reality of non-traditional students and changing instructional models and business practices. Through this partnership, the PAR Framework and AIR plan to develop new benchmarks for measuring the performance of for-profit and alternative delivery models of education, such as online learning, and to identify ways to improve “federal data collections, statutory disclosure and reporting requirements, especially with regards to transfer students and adult learners,” according to information from PAR.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/04/01/par-framework-partners-with-american-institutes-for-research.aspx

PAR Framework Partners with American Institutes for ResearchBy Leila Meyer, Campus TechnologyThe Predictive Analytics Reporting (PAR) Framework has partnered with the American Institutes for Research (AIR) in an effort to develop new metrics and measurements to help guide national policies related to higher education outcomes. The PAR Framework is an independent, non-profit provider of learner analytics as a service, and AIR is a behavioral and social science research and evaluation organization. According to the PAR Framework, the metrics currently used to compare higher education institutions in the United States are based on traditional models of education and don’t reflect the current reality of non-traditional students and changing instructional models and business practices. Through this partnership, the PAR Framework and AIR plan to develop new benchmarks for measuring the performance of for-profit and alternative delivery models of education, such as online learning, and to identify ways to improve “federal data collections, statutory disclosure and reporting requirements, especially with regards to transfer students and adult learners,” according to information from PAR.

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Wohngeldstatistik

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Thu, 2015-04-09 00:00

Die im Informationssystem eingespeicherte gestaltbare Tabelle aus der "Wohngeldstatistik" des Statistischen Bundesamtes wurde um das Jahr 2013 ergänzt.

Categories: Science News

Sir Ken Robinson: ‘Creative’ with the truth?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2015-04-08 22:44
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Donald Clark, Donald Clark Plan B, Apr 08, 2015

Ken Robinson's video on creativity is cited over and over again and was long overdue for this takedown by Donald Clark. It's the classic response: Robinson's observations and anecdotes are (a) not new, (b) not backed by data, (c) except data he has made up, and (d) are false. The piè ce de ré sistance is the wholly arbitrary map of ritalin prescriptions in the RSA video (and equally misleading graph in his own). I'm left pondering a world where Oregon and Washington are a single state, there's an Oklanebraska, east and west Dakota, and a giant interior midwestern state we'll just call Missinois. Some data.

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Task Force on Academic Freedom

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2015-04-08 19:44
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Ronald J. Daniels, Robert C. Lieberman, Johns Hopkins University, Apr 08, 2015

Johns Hopkins University last year convened a task force on academic freedom. As reported by Inside Higher Ed, "the administration is seeking feedback on the task force’ s final product." It's a short document, for some reason released only as a PDF image (to prevent it from being edited? Puh-leeese). The article cites a couple of disputes causing a reflection on the principle - "in 2013, when a dean asked a faculty member to remove a blog post," for example, or "tensions between student groups in favor of and opposed to legal abortion in recent years." I took some time this afternoon to analyze the document, present it in the analytical framework, and then pose some pointed questions, which you can read here. My take is that their policy still needs significant revision and rethinking, and that the authors have not thought through many of the more difficult issues around academic freedom. Image: Selangor Times.

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Teaching in a Digital Age

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2015-04-08 19:44
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Tony Bates, OpenText BC, Apr 08, 2015

I've cited chapters from Tony Bates's ongoing online book Teaching in a Digital Age on numerous occasions over the last few months, so I won't rehash all that here. Suffice it to say that the full text is now available as a free download on the BC Open Text website. Not that the  full PDF is 502 pages! This is a monumental accomplishment and I have no doubt that Bates will receive wide praise for his efforts over the last year.

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Competency-Based Education: A Framework for Measuring Quality Courses

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2015-04-08 16:44
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Jackie Krause, Laura Portolese Dias, Chris Schedler, Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, Apr 08, 2015

"There are no defined standards that directly address quality of competency-based courses," write the authors. "This problem is exacerbated because competency-based programs are often self-paced, requiring students to be more self-sufficient and self-directed than in instructor-led courses." They survey several other quality rubrics and observe that these typically include an evaluation of the interactivity supported by the course. "This measurement is not relevant in self-paced competency-based courses, as students do not engage in interactions with other students as a means of obtaining learning or transferring knowledge," they write. Additionally, a new rubric should focus on "the need for clear instructions for student success." I think the resulting rubric focuses on a very narrow type of course, and I'm not confident of its wider applicability. Via Tanya Joosten.

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