news (external)

Technology Moves to the Head of the 21st Century Classroom

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2017-09-11 02:06

by MIT Technology Review

Tomorrow’s jobs will demand collaborative workers steeped in hands-on problem solving. To that end, digital learning is leveling the playing field for far-flung disadvantaged students who previously would have had no chance to be part of this new workforce, as well as boosting the skills of students and workers closer to home. Cloud, virtualization, and software-defined networking—along with consumer electronic devices—are among the many advanced technologies enabling this development.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/608774/technology-moves-to-the-head-of-the-21st-century-classroom/

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Free online professional development courses being offered

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2017-09-11 02:03

by Wichita State
Wichita State is offering free online professional development badge courses.
Badges are designed for working professionals who want to learn new skills and technologies to keep up with the needs of employers. Any non-degree seeking person can take a course. Wichita State University is offering full scholarships for anyone wanting to enroll in one of 35 undergraduate online professional development badges. Badges are designed for working professionals who want to continue learning new skills and technologies to keep up with the needs of employers. The self-directed online courses allow students to go at their own pace each semester. Anyone who enrolls for one undergraduate-level badge now through Friday, Sept. 15, will have the full cost of the badge covered.

http://www.wichita.edu/thisis/stories/story.asp?si=3764

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Ausgewählte Informationen zum 19. Deutschen Lungentag am 17.09.2017. Motto: Prävention: Vorbeugen ist besser als therapieren

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Mon, 2017-09-11 00:00
Ausgewählte Informationen zum 19. Deutschen Lungentag am 17.09.2017. Motto: Prävention: Vorbeugen ist besser als therapieren
Categories: Science News

Weigh an Online Course That Uses Adaptive Learning

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2017-09-10 02:10

by Brad Fuster, US News

One challenge for me as a professor when teaching introductory classes is assessing what students already know and what they don’t, and then presenting course material in a way that is simultaneously helpful and rigorous. An online course that uses adaptive learning technology may be a great fit, especially for older students with previous work experience. But these classes also have limitations.  Adaptive courses, which are gaining popularity and offered mainly at larger online universities, individually adjust each learner’s experience in real time based on the student’s progress. For example, a three- to five-minute lecture might explain how to solve a mathematical equation. This lecture is followed by a quiz that presents the student with one problem at a time. A computer program assesses how the student answers each question, and then, based on whether they answered correctly, determines the next question.

https://www.usnews.com/education/online-learning-lessons/articles/2017-09-01/weigh-an-online-course-that-uses-adaptive-learning

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The 1 thing higher ed should really invest in to reach millennials and gen Z

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2017-09-10 02:05

BY GARY KAYYE, eCampus News

Higher education institutions often make the mistake of investing in exorbitantly expensive products they don’t need. If the higher ed market really considered the generation it serves, it would make a better cost-benefit analysis. For example, I use the completely-free Facebook LIVE in all of my classes, while my university has spent thousands of dollars on alternative solutions that are impossible for the average person to use and require an AV tech to launch. My students are familiar with Facebook. They are already on it in their daily lives. It’s free. And, let’s face it, sometimes college students don’t want to get out of bed and get dressed for class. So, Facebook LIVE allows them to never miss a class. As a professor, I am using the technology to adapt to them, instead of having them adapt to me. Remember, I’m the old person in the room, not them.

https://www.ecampusnews.com/campus-administration/higher-ed-invest-reach-millennials/

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5 Things College Administrators Wish EdTech Companies Would do

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2017-09-10 02:02

By Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

Edtech continues to change and improve the face of education, from K-12 schools all the way through to community colleges and even postgraduate institutions. We’re more connected than ever, and edtech offers a multitude of ways to improve performance and enhance the student experience. The higher education edtech market is far from solved, however: there are still things college administrators wish edtech companies would do, each of them an opportunity for aspiring edtech companies.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/5-things-college-administrators-wish-edtech-companies/

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‘Smart’ Campuses Invest in the Internet of Things

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2017-09-09 02:10

By David Raths, Campus Technology
Forward-thinking CIOs are exploring the potential of IoT technologies in higher education and heading off challenges along the way. At Sun Devil Stadium on the campus of Arizona State University in Tempe, sensors connected to the WiFi and cellular network collect temperature, humidity and noise data for use by facilities staff. As part of a longstanding cheering contest, the noise data analysis identifies the section of the stadium that is making the most noise and puts the results on a big screen. Sensors can identify if a faucet anywhere in the stadium is left running after a football game is over, to help cut water usage. ASU also is exploring providing information through a mobile app on the availability of parking and wait time estimations for concession lines and restrooms.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/08/24/smart-campuses-invest-in-the-internet-of-things.aspx

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Are Coding Bootcampus Worthwhile?

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2017-09-09 02:04

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

The truth is, some coding boot camps are basically scams. They charge students hundreds or thousands of dollars and don’t offer real training or job opportunities. However, other coding boot camps can help students learn useful skills in a short amount of time. In choosing a coding boot camp, students must be careful and do their research. The most important thing to look for is job placement statistics. Do students who graduate from this coding boot camp end up with jobs in the tech field? Programs with low job placement numbers are most likely not worth it. After all, the purpose of attending a coding boot camp is to land a job.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/coding-bootcamps-worth/

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Is Artificial Intelligence the Future of Education

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2017-09-09 02:02

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

While we’re far from seeing robots in the classroom, artificial intelligence is making its way into education. Certain tasks can be made easier through the use of artificial intelligence. Grading, for example, can be done quickly and easily using artificial intelligence. In the future, we can expect to see even more artificial intelligence in the classroom. Artificial intelligence could be used to personalize the education experience for students. Programs that use artificial intelligence can act as tutors for students by determining what each student is struggling with and delivering personalized interventions, just as a teacher would. Robots could someday provide one-on-one tutoring or coaching sessions to bring struggling students up to speed.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/artificial-intelligence-future-education/

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Orion Labs completes $18.25M in Funding to Expand its Next Generation Voice Platform for Real-time Business

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2017-09-08 21:35

Press Release, Orion, Sept 08, 2017

While I was in Poland I joked with the translator that he would need to find a new job soon. He assured me he was find for now. Well, maybe not. Here's Orion. "Starting today, all customers have access to a preview of Translator, Orion’s new real-time voice translation bot. Orion’s Translator gives users the ability to speak in English and have their message instantly translated to Spanish, or the other way around." It's by the company which makes Onyx, "a compact, lightweight wearable for real-time, heads-up walkie-talkie-style communication over any distance with other Onyx users." Onyx is currently shipping to the U.S. and Canada; the Android app works with Onyx to provide access to Orion.

[Link] [Comment]

A free, teacher-less university in France is schooling thousands of future-proof programmers

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2017-09-08 21:15

Jenny Anderson, Quartz, Sept 08, 2017

You might think there's a lot I like about this tuition-free school, where the curriculum consists of nothing more than projects given go students (at 8L:42 a.m.; they get 48 hours to complete them). The students manage everything else, up to and including the design of the elevator ("hip-hop blaring from the speakers and blue and green lights piercing the darkness") to grading to the food truck out back. It does work (100% of the students get jobs) but it's easy to be successful when you're very selective (1,000 of 64K applicants) and when the students have independent income ("three years is a long time to forego a salary, even if students get internships along the way"). I also don't agree that "the ultimate gauge of success, of course, is jobs." The ultimate gauge is more like satisfaction in life. This article doesn't report on that. Still, "for thousands of young people who have limited options, School 42 offers a wealth of opportunity: an education, a community, and real-life skills that are in high demand among employers." That's not nothing.

[Link] [Comment]

Digital badging for facilitating virtual recognition of an achievement 

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2017-09-08 20:46

John Arlan Brock, Sept 08, 2017

Audrey Watters points to this patent granted to SalesForce for digital badges, or more specifically "a computer-implemented method of facilitating virtual recognition of an achievement implemented in a database system communicatively coupled with a social networking system." It has a priority date of 2014 (in other words, well after digital badges were invented). It also refers to users using Netscape's Navigator browser, so there's a bit of cookie-cutter language in there. I don't really have much use for the patent system in our field; it's basically a way for people with enough money to file patents to claim ownership of stuff other people have invented. But hey, my hat's off to John Arlan Brock, the "inventor" of digital badging for facilitating virtual recognition of an achievement.

[Link] [Comment]

Feedback: It’s all it cracked up to be!

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2017-09-08 20:31

Brett D. Christensen, Workplace Performance, Sept 08, 2017

This is a nice discussion of feedback based on the example of traffic signs. Brett Christensen talks about the signs in his town that display your speed as you drive by; they're used to encourage better behaviour in things like school zones. And they work, but only under certain conditions. The sign should provide feedback on your actual performance. It should be located where there's a real need, and if it's a permanant installation, people will get used to it, and it will be ignored. That explains why the speed sign in my village of Casselman is moved around town. And it explains why it strobes when I'm going too fast (but not why it strobes when I am travelling at precisely the speed limit). "The key," says Christensen, "is (1) appropriate feedback can increase performance, (2) too much won’t have that same positive effect and (3) when you are the person providing the feedback, asking your employee... could help you find that sweet spot!"

[Link] [Comment]

Open Education: Please give

elearnspace by George Siemens - Fri, 2017-09-08 17:44

In about a month, David Wiley and I are teaching this course on edX: Introduction to Open Education. As we are both firm adherents to social and participatory pedagogical models (i.e. we like it when others do our work), we need some help. Specifically, we’d love to have faculty/researchers/practitioners provide short 3-5 minute reflections on one or more of the following topics:

Week 1: Why Open Matters
Week 2: Copyright, The Public Domain, and The Commons
Week 3: The 5R Activities and the Creative Commons Licenses
Week 4: Creating, Finding and Using OER
Week 5: Research on the Impact of OER Adoption
Week 6: The Next Battles for Openness: Data, Algorithms, and Competency Mapping

The process:
1. Create a short video/tutorial or any other artifact (if we have yours by Sept 14, we’ll include it in the course) responding to any of the above weekly topics
2. Upload your creation to some site where we can access/download it
3. Email me a link (gsiemens, gmail) or share on Twitter using #openedmooc or leave a link in the comments
4. Sit back and enjoy the feeling of accomplishment that will wash over you knowing you’ve made the world a better place.

OPERAS Design Study

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2017-09-08 15:27

OPERAS, Sept 08, 2017

According to the website, "OPERAS is a distributed research infrastructure project in Europe to support the development of open scholarly communication," especially in the social sciences and humanities (SSH). The design studiy was released over the summer, and has four parts: a landscape study that "identifies recent developments and challenges within the scholaly communication framework," a technical mapping that "provides a global description of the technical, organizational and information systems within the OPERAS consortium," a usage study "describing current practices regarding open access, the evaluation of existing services, the missing services, and the level of interest for integrated new services," and a  European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) landscape study. There's a wealth of information here and it wouldn't be the worst idea to use this project as a template for similar projects elsewhere. OPERAS stands for "open access in the European Research Area through scholarly communication," though I doubt this full title is used very much. Note that it would be nice to see the project use an RSS feel or some sort of syndicated communication over and above its monthly PDF newsletter and social media accounts.

[Link] [Comment]

3 Ways to Improve Your Expertise in Any Profession

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2017-09-08 02:10

BY ZAC JOHNSON, Business.com

Want to improve your expertise and professional skills? Of course you do. It’s one of the best ways to not only get ahead in your professional career, but it’s a great way to improve your self-confidence. The good news is that it’s now easier than ever to accomplish this through the power of the internet. There is no longer a need to attend expensive classes or certification programs in your area. Thanks to the internet, anyone can pretty much learn how to do anything. Linked below are three of the best ways to continue your education or hone your skills and expertise through online courses while documenting your success and connecting with others online.

https://www.business.com/articles/three-ways-to-improve-your-expertise-in-any-profession/

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Increasing equity through educational technology

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2017-09-08 02:05

by Elise Chen, MIT News

Justin Reich was ready to observe a teacher integrating technology into her lesson plan at a school in rural New Hampshire. Her school had bought the laptops, Reich says. She had reserved them. They were charged. All of the kids were logged in. The power was on in the building. The wireless network was working. The projector bulb was working. The screen was working. But when the teacher went to plug the projector into the wall, the electrical socket fell behind the drywall, foiling her attempted lesson plan. “New technologies have tremendous potential to improve student learning,” Reich says, “but many pieces in a complex system need to be working seamlessly to make this happen.”
Reich, an assistant professor in MIT’s Comparative Media Studies/Writing Program (CMS/W), has remained excited about the possibilities that constantly evolving technologies have brought to the learning process over the last few decades.

http://news.mit.edu/2017/increasing-equity-through-educational-technology-justin-reich-0830

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College Professor Goes Viral After Scolding His Online Class for Not Showing Up in Person

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2017-09-08 02:02

by Elizabeth Logan, Teen Vogue

Just after 10:30 a.m. on Monday, the teacher wrote his new students an email with the subject line “Disappointed.” that read, “Today was the first day of class and nobody showed up. If this is how you will all act the entire semester, feel free to drop my course.”  Instead of dropping out, it looks like students decided to, um, alert the professor to the class being online, because 15 minutes later, everyone got another email, this time with the subject line “I’m sorry.” saying, “It has just come to my attention that this is an online course. No in person class time is required. I am very sorry for the rude email. I’m not a jerk, I promise. Please forgive me, class.” [ed note – almost certainly fake, but still a good story!]

http://www.teenvogue.com/story/viral-college-professor-scolds-online-class

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Weltlymphomtag am 15.09.2017

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Fri, 2017-09-08 00:00
Ausgewählte Informationen zum Weltlymphomtag am 15.09.2017
Categories: Science News

More Or Less Technology In The Classroom? We’re Asking The Wrong Question

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2017-09-07 22:09

Cathy Davidson, Fast Company, Sept 07, 2017

I'm not sure whether Catrhy Davidson's description of MOOC as "Massive Open Online Courseware" is a deliberate commentary or an accidental oversight. I prefer to think it's the former, especially in the context of her denunciation of tech hyperbole. But in adition to criticizing technophilia she is equally harsh on technophobia. "Most of the technophobic responses to devices assume that school should be cordoned off from the real world," she writes, and they make claims about whether tech improves or hams students' grades. But "that’s the wrong metric," she argues. "The purpose of education should not be better grades or a diploma. It should be the best possible preparation for thriving in a complex and changing world." And we should be focusing on improving practice. "The best pedagogical research we have reinforces the idea that learning in the classroom is most effective when it proceeds pretty much the way it does when we try to master something new outside of school: learning incrementally, being challenged, trying again." I'm in broad agreement with all this.

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