news (external)

Presentation Planning

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Tue, 2016-01-26 19:14


Common Craft, Jan 26, 2016

I studied public speaking in school and became quite good at it, winning four championships in six years. Back then I would memorize my talks, then improvise a bit as I spoke. Later, when I began doing academic presentations, the mode de rigeur was to read the paper to the audience. That was as dull as it sounds (and it's astonishing to see the practice persist still in some academic conferences). All this was before Power Point. With Power Point I could use notes and put them on the screen. I had also by that time read and mastered  Winging It by keithe Spicer. So now I could do pretty complex talks without notes. The method outlined in this Common Craft video is similar to what you'll read in the (pre-internet) Spicer book, but with visuals. It's good - if basic - advice. Via Richard Byrne.

[Link] [Comment]

Review of Continued Progress: Promising Evidence on Personalized Learning

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Tue, 2016-01-26 04:12


William R. Penuel, Raymond Johnson, National Education Policy Center, Jan 25, 2016

This is a review of a report titled Continued Progress: Promising Evidence on Personalized Learning (57 page PDF) which summarizes finding from three projects based on the idea of personalized learning. According to the report, the findings are generally positive, but they warn against saying the one thing caused the other; the experimental design was too weak and the data mixed. The review published by the National Education Policy Center (12 page PDF)echoes these cautions and also questions the methodology on a variety of grounds, the most serious of which is probably the predominance of charter schools in the research projects, a process that introduces "bias associated with being a school selected as part of a competitive process to be part of a program." Fair enough, but I think there are some positive takeaways. It's hard to balance personalized learning with a requirement of standardized outcomes, and the fact that these projects show no evidence of being disasters suggests that personalizing learning will, at a minimum, do no harm. I think that is promising evidence, even if the authors of the review do not.

[Link] [Comment]

Zygmunt Bauman: “Social media are a trap”

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Tue, 2016-01-26 04:12


Ricardo de Querol, El Pais, Jan 25, 2016

There's a lot to protest, says Zygmunt Bauman, but protest has been ineffective in the social media age, an age in which in which "all agreements are temporary, fleeting, and valid only until further notice" (this reminds me of an interview I heard on the weekend to the effect that the impact of Uber is that companies will feel free to flout regulations simply by saying they don't apply. Part of the problem, he says, is that social media protests lack leaders, so "they cannot convert their sense of purpose into action." In effect, "The difference between a community and a network is that you belong to a community, but a network belongs to you... people use social media not to unite, not to open their horizons wider, but on the contrary, to cut themselves a comfort zone where the only sounds they hear are the echoes of their own voice."  Zygmunt Bauman is a force, but I don't agree with his analysis here. True, the social contract (such as it is) is dissolving, but I don't think social networks are the cause. Creating change is no longer about forcing your will on to a recalcitrant community, it's about creating alternatives through networks of associations. More: Bauman Institute.

[Link] [Comment]

Turnitin Launches Service Designed to Improve Student Writing

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2016-01-26 01:05

By David Nagel, THE Journal

Turnitin, best known in education circles for its technology designed to detect plagiarism in students’ papers, has launched a new tool that aims to improve those students’ papers during the writing process. According to Turnitin, the technology, called Turnitin Revision Assistant, goes beyond simple grammar and spelling checks and instead provide “actionable comments” on demand, offering feedback on such aspects of their writing as “focus, use of evidence or organization, among many others,” according to the company.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/01/21/turnitin-launches-service-designed-to-improve-student-writing.aspx

Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_16491') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_16491') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_16491') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_16491'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_16491') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

Game-Based Learning Has Practical Applications for Nontraditional Students

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2016-01-26 01:02

By Marguerite McNeal, edSurge

Can game-based learning help nontraditional students improve outcomes? That’s the central question behind a report released today by Muzzy Lane Software, a Newbury, Mass.-based game development platform. Game-based experiences like role-playing scenarios and puzzles can let students test competencies in a safe environment. The new report shows the potential for these learners to benefit from modular, game-based approaches that fit within their lives and their instructors’ workflows. “We hope that this [research] leads to educators and curriculum designers and game-makers thinking about approaches to games that can overcome hurdles of cost and fit that have been holding things back,” says Bert Snow, principal investigator and vice president of design at Muzzy Lane.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-01-20-game-based-learning-has-practical-applications-for-nontraditional-learners

Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_16488') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_16488') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_16488') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_16488'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_16488') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

Reshma Saujani Makes the Case for Girls Who Code

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2016-01-26 01:01

By Patrick Peterson, THE Journal

The code that makes computers run consists of long strings of seemingly random numbers and letters that tell the computer how to react to certain requests and even let the computer perform tasks that seem almost human. The geeky wizards who control this digital magic are mostly young men. But girls, led by lawyer-turned-tech-advocate Reshma Saujani, have begun to mine this source of power. “They are interested and they are good at it,” Saujani said during a keynote address to FETC 2016 last week in Orlando. Through the organization Saujani founded in 2012, Girls Who Code, more than 10,000 young women have been learning to create computer software which runs everything from smartphones to the nation’s power grid. The girls have discovered that there is no reason for them to avoid high-tech fields, which are normally chosen by boys.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/01/20/reshma-saujani-makes-the-case-for-girls-who-code.aspx

Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_16494') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_16494') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_16494') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_16494'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_16494') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

Statistik der natürlichen Bevölkerungsbewegung

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Mon, 2016-01-25 23:00

Die im Informationssystem eingespeicherten gestaltbaren Tabellen aus dem Bereich "Statistik der natürlichen Bevölkerungsbewegung" des Statistischen Bundesamtes wurden um die Angaben des Jahres 2014 ergänzt.

Categories: Science News

Are At-Risk Students Bunnies to Be Drowned?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Mon, 2016-01-25 19:11


Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed, Jan 25, 2016

It's hard to know whether to be amused or offended by this story. Anyone who has attended university is familiar with the concept of 'weeding out' courses designed to thin the incoming class. And while there are many defenders of this philosophy, few have put it so, um, graphically: "This is hard for you because you think of the students as cuddly bunnies, but you can’ t. You just have to drown the bunnies … put a Glock to their heads." The speaker in question is Mount St. Mary’ s University president Simon Newman, as reported in the MSMU student newspaper, the Mountain Echo. It reminds me of the old 'or  the bunny gets it' clip. So obviously the language is inappropriate for the context. Even so, MSVU's Board is  standing by their president.

[Link] [Comment]

3 Things to Consider Before Taking Online Courses in College

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2016-01-25 01:10

by Say Campus Life

Before you choose online as the route that is best for you, it’s important to understand that this format can be a challenge. Here are 3 things to do before starting online course work. Hopefully they help you decide.

http://www.saycampuslife.com/2016/01/20/3-things-to-consider-before-taking-online-courses-in-college/

Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_16485') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_16485') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_16485') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_16485'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_16485') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

Confessions of a MOOC professor: three things I learned and two things I worry about

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2016-01-25 01:02

by John Covach, the Conversation

Roughly two-thirds of my students have been over the age of 25. When we think about college courses, we assume the students are age 18-24, since that’s the usual age at which one gets an undergraduate degree. There are a significant number of people out there, however, who are interested in continuing to learn later in life. Students who take MOOC courses tend to be older and are mostly international. Continuing education courses at colleges and universities have served that public to a certain degree, but it is clear that there is more demand among older students than many might have suspected. Given the chance to learn according to their own schedule and location, many find this option very attractive. MOOC students are mostly international and already college-educated

http://theconversation.com/confessions-of-a-mooc-professor-three-things-i-learned-and-two-things-i-worry-about-53330

Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_16479') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_16479') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_16479') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_16479'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_16479') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

In Case of Emergency

xkcd.com - Mon, 2016-01-25 01:00
Categories: Cartoons, Science News

Arzneimittelmarkt in Zahlen

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Sun, 2016-01-24 23:00

Die im Informationssystem eingespeicherten gestaltbaren Tabellen aus dem Bereich "Arzneimittelmarkt in Deutschland in Zahlen" des Bundesfachverbandes der Arzneimittel-Hersteller e.V. wurden um die Angaben des Jahres 2014 ergänzt.

Categories: Science News

The Stanford professor who pioneered praising kids for effort says we’ve totally missed the point

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2016-01-24 19:06


Jenny Anderson, Quartz, Jan 24, 2016

We've probably all heard the sarcastic comments about giving every kid a prize for trying, instead of awarding one prize to the winner. The idea of praising effort rather than results is scorned and ridiculed. But as this article notes, if we praise only results, those with more ability are content with an easy win, and those with less ability look for shortcuts and ways to game the system. Praising effort is important. But as reseracher Carol Dweck says "people needed to know" (ironically behind a paywall) the reason effort is important is that it leads to results. "The exciting part of Dweck’ s mindset research is that it shows intelligence is malleable... The more they had a growth mindset in 2nd grade the better they did in 4th grade and the relationship was significant."

[Link] [Comment]

The Urban, Infrastructural Geography Of ‘The Cloud’

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2016-01-24 01:09

by Alan Wiig, Vantage

The relationship between data to space extends beyond the network equipment, services, and mobile devices that transmit and present information to a user. Pervasive wireless connectivity and ubiquitous computing, as ‘the cloud’ are central, common elements of contemporary urban life. Data centers translate, as it were, between individuals and their experience of the city by mediating experiences through digital augmentation. An example of this is Google Maps’ locative ability to place the user on the map and then orient said user to wherever they need to go. While data is largely immaterial except in the action it enables, like getting you to your meeting with that map, the storage, maintenance, and transmission of data require many layers of interfacing telecommunication infrastructure that function nearly everywhere but are always, inherently embedded in particular places.

https://medium.com/vantage/the-urban-infrastructural-geography-of-the-cloud-1b076cf9b06e#.20nb1elgr

Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_16476') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_16476') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_16476') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_16476'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_16476') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

Students balance online classes with work, family

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2016-01-24 01:04

By Braulio Tellez, The Shorthorn

Nursing senior Natasha Gatti takes online classes at UTA from halfway across the nation. She wouldn’t be as successful as an online-only student without being able to properly budget her time. Gatti began taking online classes in the fall. She is a full-time student working toward a bachelor’s in nursing and takes 18 hours of online classes. She also works part-time as a night shift nurse at a CareOne long-term acute facility in New Jersey. Online classes really do not differ from on campus courses, she said. The interactions in class are replaced by class discussions through BlackBoard. Face time with professors is compensated by working with academic coaches, assistants assigned to online nursing students. They have the same degree of knowledge as professors and help students in their courses.

http://www.theshorthorn.com/life_and_entertainment/students-balance-online-classes-with-work-family/article_38c58dc8-be10-11e5-95af-177b9e9767f4.html

Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_16473') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_16473') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_16473') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_16473'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_16473') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

How Five EdTech Start-Ups Are Using Big Data To Boost Business Education

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2016-01-24 01:03

by Seb Murray, Business Because

Education tech companies including Coursera, edX, Udacity and their b-school and university partners are delving deeper into big data analytics to improve teaching and student learning. Simon Nelson, CEO of online learning company FutureLearn, says: “The potential is incredible — and we are just scratching the surface.” A report to be published in January by the UK’s Higher Education Commission (HEC) envisages that big data will help identify risk of failure; give students instant feedback; and benchmark their performance against peers.

http://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-distance-learning/3726/edtech-explores-big-data-to-boost-online-learning

Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_16471') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_16471') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_16471') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_16471'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_16471') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

What a Million Syllabuses Can Teach Us

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2016-01-23 22:00


Joe Karaganis, David McClure, New York Times, Jan 23, 2016

This is an article in the New York Times about The Open Syllabus Project. So far this site, as the name suggests, has "collected more than a million syllabuses from university websites." The purpose is to "extract some of their key components — their metadata — starting with their dates, their schools, their fields of study and the texts that they assign." It's a news story because this week they made their "syllabus explorer" public. But don't be misled - you can't actually find or explore syllabi using this took; the actual content remains hidden. It's just a list of th most common book references in syllabi (or as they say it, 'syllabuses').

(Note: I've started hitting subscription walls on New York Times articles - I've tried adding the following extension to the link: ?partner=rss& emc=rss to try to make it go away. If this doesn't work I'll cease linking to New York Times articles, as the objectiove of OLDaily is to provide you dith dirct access to articles, not to act as advertising for paywall sites. More on these paywalls.)

[Link] [Comment]

Case studies highlight adaptive learning outcomes

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2016-01-23 01:10

by eCampus News

At the University of Texas at Arlington, a four-year state university, serving approximately 35,000 students, data show strong positive correlations between average MyFinanceLab homework scores and both average Learning Catalytics and average Dynamic Study Module grades. Also, students who earned higher average Learning Catalytics and Dynamic Study Module grades earned higher average exam scores. Specifically, students who completed the most assignments scored eight percent higher on exams than students who skipped more than the average number of assignments. Learning Catalytics is an interactive, classroom-based feature of MyLab and Mastering that uses students’ smartphones, tablets, or laptops to engage them in more sophisticated tasks and thinking.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/adaptive-learning-outcomes-651/

Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_16468') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_16468') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_16468') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_16468'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_16468') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

Can MOOCs be a successful alternative for community colleges?

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2016-01-23 01:05

By Matt Lawson, eCampus News

While that hype has not panned out, MOOCs did find a good foothold in our nation’s community colleges, where online classes provide scheduling flexibility for nontraditional students dealing with life demands; lower-cost options for students who need more cost-effective alternatives; or a stop-gap remedial solution for students needing help to fill in holes in their educational backgrounds. That last use case has proven to be a top priority for community colleges across the nation. When I was the Director of Enterprise Services for Virginia’s Community Colleges, improving student success was a cornerstone strategic goal for the community colleges. Community colleges face unique challenges with student success: in the U.S., at least 50 percent of entrants need at least one year of developmental education in order to be prepared for entry-level college courses. MOOCs offer the possibility of allowing students to improve their basic skills and test into college?level courses without having to pay for remedial classes.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/moocs-community-colleges-109/

Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_16466') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_16466') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_16466') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_16466'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_16466') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

edX now offers complete programmes online, not just individual courses: CEO Anant Agarwal

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2016-01-23 01:02

By Rica Bhattacharyya, Economic Times

MOOCs was earlier about creating individual courses in many areas and people could take them for free. Today, we have broken through in many major dimensions. One big example is today we offer complete programmes, not just individual courses, and we have also made a breakthrough with offering programme credit and certificates. For example, we launched a major data science programme with Columbia University. So, imagine, if you are student or working with a company you can complete a whole program.  You can learn anything on MOOC for free, but if you want a micro masters credential, you have to pay a fee of $200-300 for the entire programme.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/opinion/interviews/edx-now-offers-complete-programmes-online-not-just-individual-courses-ceo-anant-agarwal/articleshow/50632132.cms Share on Facebook var button = document.getElementById('facebook_share_link_16463') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_icon_16463') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_both_16463') || document.getElementById('facebook_share_button_16463'); if (button) { button.onclick = function(e) { var url = this.href.replace(/share\.php/, 'sharer.php'); window.open(url,'sharer','toolbar=0,status=0,width=626,height=436'); return false; } if (button.id === 'facebook_share_button_16463') { button.onmouseover = function(){ this.style.color='#fff'; this.style.borderColor = '#295582'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#3b5998'; } button.onmouseout = function(){ this.style.color = '#3b5998'; this.style.borderColor = '#d8dfea'; this.style.backgroundColor = '#fff'; } } }

Pages

Subscribe to Ulrich Schrader's Website aggregator