news (external)

Ed-Tech and the Commercialization of School

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2016-06-15 18:27


Audrey Watters, Hack Education, Jun 15, 2016

Good column by Audrey Watters: "  the problem isn’ t simply that schools are spending billions of taxpayer dollars on technology. That is, the problem is not simply that there are businesses that sell products to schools; businesses have always sold products to schools. The problem is that we don’ t really examine the ideologies that accompany these technologies." 

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Russ Whitehurst Throws Cold Water on the Grit Craze, But Is the Water Too Cold?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2016-06-15 18:27


Jay P. Greene, Education Next, Jun 15, 2016

Maybe this can put the whole 'grit' fad permanently to rest. As  Russ Whitehurst says, grit can't be 'taught'  per se, and even if it could, accounts for virtually no improvement in learning outcomes.  Jay P. Greene would like to keep the corpse alive. "There is a growing body of evidence that suggests character skills are malleable and that education plays an important role in shaping and altering character," he writes. Maybe. But is the goal of education really to make all of us conscientious, nice and hard-working people? Or is this just someone's idea of what poor people should be like if they want to better themselves? Instead of, say, being born rich, or living is an equitable social democracy?

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Nursing Knowledge: 2015 Big Data Science.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
Related Articles

Nursing Knowledge: 2015 Big Data Science.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):427-31

Authors: Westra BL, Pruinelli L, Delaney CW

PMID: 26468968 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Data Visualization Techniques to Showcase Nursing Care Quality.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
Related Articles

Data Visualization Techniques to Showcase Nursing Care Quality.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):417-26

Authors: Monsen KA, Peterson JJ, Mathiason MA, Kim E, Lee S, Chi CL, Pieczkiewicz DS

PMID: 26468967 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Usability of the Clinical Care Classification System for Representing Nursing Practice According to Specialty.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
Related Articles

Usability of the Clinical Care Classification System for Representing Nursing Practice According to Specialty.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):448-55

Authors: Feng RC, Chang P

Abstract
This study examined the ability of the Clinical Care Classification system to represent nursing record data across various nursing specialties. The data comprised nursing care plan records from December 1998 to October 2008 in a medical center. The total number of care plan documentation we analyzed was 2 060 178, and we used a process of knowledge discovery in datasets for data analysis. The results showed that 75.42% of the documented diagnosis terms could be mapped using the Clinical Care Classification system. However, a difference in nursing terminology emerged among various nursing specialties, ranging from 0.1% for otorhinolaryngology to 100% for colorectal surgery and plastic surgery. The top five nursing diagnoses were identified as knowledge deficit, acute pain, infection risk, falling risk, and bleeding risk, which were the most common health problems in an acute care setting but not in non-acute care settings. Overall, we identified a total of 21 established nursing diagnoses, which we recommend adding to the Clinical Care Classification system, most of which are applicable to emergency and intensive care specialties. Our results show that Clinical Care Classification is useful for documenting patient's problems in an acute setting, but we suggest adding new diagnoses to identify health problems in specialty settings.

PMID: 26418298 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Use of Simulation to Study Nurses' Acceptance and Nonacceptance of Clinical Decision Support Suggestions.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
Related Articles

Use of Simulation to Study Nurses' Acceptance and Nonacceptance of Clinical Decision Support Suggestions.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):465-72

Authors: Sousa VE, Lopez KD, Febretti A, Stifter J, Yao Y, Johnson A, Wilkie DJ, Keenan GM

Abstract
Our long-term goal was to ensure nurse clinical decision support works as intended before full deployment in clinical practice. As part of a broader effort, this pilot project explored factors influencing acceptance/nonacceptance of eight clinical decision support suggestions displayed in an electronic health record-based nursing plan of care software prototype. A diverse sample of 21 nurses participated in this high-fidelity clinical simulation experience and completed a questionnaire to assess reasons for accepting/not accepting the clinical decision support suggestions. Of 168 total suggestions displayed during the experiment (eight for each of the 21 nurses), 123 (73.2%) were accepted, and 45 (26.8%) were not accepted. The mode number of acceptances by nurses was seven of eight, with only two of 21 nurses accepting all. The main reason for clinical decision support acceptance was the nurse's belief that the suggestions were good for the patient (100%), with other features providing secondary reinforcement. Reasons for nonacceptance were less clear, with fewer than half of the subjects indicating low confidence in the evidence. This study provides preliminary evidence that high-quality simulation and targeted questionnaires about specific clinical decision support selections offer a cost-effective means for testing before full deployment in clinical practice.

PMID: 26361268 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Factors Affecting Nursing Students' Readiness and Perceptions Toward the Use of Mobile Technologies for Learning.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
Related Articles

Factors Affecting Nursing Students' Readiness and Perceptions Toward the Use of Mobile Technologies for Learning.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):456-64

Authors: Zayim N, Ozel D

Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the current usage of mobile devices, preferences of mobile learning environments and examine the readiness of nursing students in a public university. In order to investigate preferences and attitudes with respect to mobile technology use in nursing education, 387 students at a state university have been surveyed. It has been observed that while students preferred their current portable laptops, those in higher classes were more inclined to favor mobile phones. The common problems of battery life and high cost of communication, both in smartphones and tablet systems, suggest that hardware quality and financial constraints seem to be two main factors in determining these technologies. While more than half of students expressed readiness for mobile learning, one quarter indicated indecision. Through multivariate regression analysis, readiness to use mobile learning can be described in terms of perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, personal innovativeness, self-management of learning, perceived device limitation, and availability. Class level, perceived ease of use, personal innovativeness, and self-management of learning explain intention to use mobile learning. Findings obtained from these results can provide guidance in the development and application of mobile learning systems.

PMID: 26200902 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Using the Technology: Introducing Point of View Video Glasses Into the Simulated Clinical Learning Environment.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
Related Articles

Using the Technology: Introducing Point of View Video Glasses Into the Simulated Clinical Learning Environment.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):443-7; quiz E1

Authors: Metcalfe H, Jonas-Dwyer D, Saunders R, Dugmore H

Abstract
The introduction of learning technologies into educational settings continues to grow alongside the emergence of innovative technologies into the healthcare arena. The challenge for health professionals such as medical, nursing, and allied health practitioners is to develop an improved understanding of these technologies and how they may influence practice and contribute to healthcare. For nurse educators to remain contemporary, there is a need to not only embrace current technologies in teaching and learning but to also ensure that students are able to adapt to this changing pedagogy. One recent technological innovation is the use of wearable computing technology, consisting of video recording with the capability of playback analysis. The authors of this article discuss the introduction of the use of wearable Point of View video glasses by a cohort of nursing students in a simulated clinical learning laboratory. Of particular interest was the ease of use of the glasses, also termed the usability of this technology, which is central to its success. Students' reflections were analyzed together with suggestions for future use.

PMID: 26176638 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

CaseWorld: Authentic Case-Based Learning Simulating Healthcare Practice.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Wed, 2016-06-15 12:27
Related Articles

CaseWorld: Authentic Case-Based Learning Simulating Healthcare Practice.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2015 Oct;33(10):436-42

Authors: Tucker K, Parker S, Gillham D, Wright V, Cornell J

Abstract
Health educators in Australia are challenged by the need to provide clinically relevant education to large numbers of students across a wide range of specialties. This situation is compounded by changed student demographics, new technologies in both the workplace and university, and decreased access to clinical placement opportunities for students. This article describes an innovative response addressing nurse education priorities and implemented in the School of Nursing at Flinders University South Australia, involving the development of CaseWorld, a prototype virtual case-based learning environment. CaseWorld implementation was unique because large-scale innovation occurred as part of routine curriculum development. This was challenging as there was limited opportunity for prototype evaluation before student use, thus necessitating a flexible implementation process. The outcome was the development of scripted unfolding cases that provide students with low-fidelity simulation enhanced by multimedia. Students engage with cases based on real patient experiences, which are modified to protect confidentiality. These authentic cases provide the basis for the development of critical-thinking and decision-making skills as students problem solve issues and identify priorities for nursing care, explain the pathophysiology, and respond to simulated patient complaints. CaseWorld was modified in response to evaluation data from surveys and focus groups, and the revised version is discussed in terms of its implementation in nursing and planned use across multiple health sciences disciplines.

PMID: 26176635 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Students gravitate to online courses, legislators talk higher ed facilities

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Wed, 2016-06-15 02:10

By Anna Burleson, Grand Forks Herald

Many students taking classes at colleges and universities in North Dakota are doing so online. At the 11 North Dakota University System institutions, 47 percent of students take at least one distance course, which is defined as a class delivered via video, online, or other long distance instructional method. In 2012, that number sat at 40 percent, according to information presented to the interim Legislative Higher Education Funding Committee. In total, 69 percent of all NDUS students who take at least one distance course live in the state and 61 percent enrolled solely in distance courses are also North Dakota residents, Chief of Staff and Vice Chancellor for IT and Institutional Research Lisa Feldner said.

http://www.grandforksherald.com/news/education/4052162-students-gravitate-online-courses-legislators-talk-higher-ed-facilities

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Udacity Launches in German-Speaking Countries, Looks to Move Beyond Engineering

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Wed, 2016-06-15 02:05

by EdSurge

Udacity has begun operations in Germany, Austria and Switzerland—quickly becoming its fastest growing regions—according to an email to Edsurge. The Silicon Valley-based company, now worth more than $1 billion, offers short professional development courses, dubbed “nanodegrees,” on technical topics such as data analytics and software development. In the email, Udacity representatives said that the company sees many of its German-speaking users coming from the automotive and banking sectors. The education arm of the German publisher Bertelsmann, Udacity’s biggest shareholder, is assisting with its deployment across the new regions.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-06-09-udacity-launches-in-german-speaking-countries-looks-to-move-beyond-engineering

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Rankled by college rankings

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Wed, 2016-06-15 02:02

by Matt Zalaznick, University Business

Almost everybody ranks colleges these days—old stalwarts like U.S. News & World Report, influential upstarts like Washington Monthly and click-baiting websites that measure everything from campus sustainability to most attractive students to coolest mascots. William Destler, president of Rochester Institute of Technology in New York, even found his university named one of the “geekiest” in 2014. While these smaller lists can offer some comic pride, the broader, higher-profile rankings routinely favor elite colleges and universities—and this sells the higher education system short by comparing institutions that have widely varying missions, he says. This article may not contain all of them, but there’s an unranked and un-alphabetized list of the big (and not-so-big) organizations producing higher ed ratings systems.

http://www.universitybusiness.com/article/rankled-college-rankings

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Phishing License

xkcd.com - Wed, 2016-06-15 02:00
Categories: Cartoons, Science News

Exploring IBM's vision for enterprise collaboration

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Wed, 2016-06-15 00:20


Dion Hinchcliffe, ZDNet, Jun 14, 2016

With Microsoft entering social in a big way, it's worth taking another look at IBM's play in the space, a play backed by years of development, in-house testing, and some judicious acquisitions. Where IBM stands out, I think, is with the analytics services to add into the mix (what they call 'cognitive collaboration'). "People want a team-oriented collaborative approach, they also want help with their knowledge. We want to bring our intelligent bots and their cognitive approach," says IBM VP Ed Brill. For example, "The doctor and patient can then have a real-time meeting even though they're actually distributed, with  IBM Watson  listening to the conversation in the background, providing an intelligent platform that looks at the context of what's being discussed." I'd love to be working with technology like this to develop open and personal learning.

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RefMe

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Tue, 2016-06-14 21:19


RefMe, Jun 14, 2016

Do as I did and go directly to the RefMe site. It's a lovely little application that helps you manage references. It has the obligatory Chrome extension. It imports (only 100, though) and exports (in various formats) references. For a (reasonable) price, there's an Word plug-in. And you can use your mobile camera, scan book/journal barcodes, and even turn printed text into digital text with your smartphone camera. There's also an API  to encourage interoperability. And a suite of services for institutions. I like this a lot. A lot, I say.

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Should Your Online Course Sound Like 'Serial'?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Tue, 2016-06-14 18:19


Amy Ahearn, EdSurge, Jun 14, 2016

I am an incurable listener of audio and radio - during the day I listen to CBC radio, on the road I'm a podcast addict, evenings will find me attentive to the Blue Jays  broadcasts, and at night I am up with Johnny Dollar, Phillip Marlowe, and the rest of the cast of old time radio. And of course I have contributed hundreds of hours  of my own voice to audio as well. What characterizes audio today more than ever is the diversity of voices you hear. So I  agree with Amy Ahearn that by contrast "online learning has a mansplaining problem." It's not so much the voice as the attitude. Consider  Krista Tippett: "Tippett’ s sentences were long, complex and contemplative. Her tone was one of inquiry rather than authority. She sounded different than typical instructors on platforms like Udemy, Udacity, Skillshare or Coursera who lecture in tones of confident authority.... her voice might be exactly what online learning needs." Well, OK, it's the voice too. We need more voices, and we need more diverse voices. Now I can't help being who I am, so my voice isn't going to change, But maybe I should be more like Bryan Alexander  and  talk to different people in the field. It's worth a thought.

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LinkedIn, Microsoft, and Higher Ed

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Tue, 2016-06-14 18:19


Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed, Jun 14, 2016

Disposable commentary, except for this: "I’ ve  long thought that Microsoft should buy Coursera  - and now this LinkedIn purchase may create a compelling reason to explore that deal." Coursera isn't necessarily the best deal; its client base (not to be confused with enrollements) is limited and data collection is sparse. And it's transitioning  to a new and essentially untested platform. But a company like Desire2Learn would fit neatly between the Microsoft technology stack and the LinkedIn employment and professional development stack - and Desire2Learn, already based on Microsoft technologies, has a built-in client base of hundreds of schools and colleges worldwide. Image: D2L, Brightspace integration  with Microsoft Office 365.

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Having a PLN

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Tue, 2016-06-14 18:19


Doug Peterson, doug — off the record, Jun 14, 2016

I'm only doing two of the five things recommended  by Doug Peterson, but that's good enough for me. Peterson links to a drawing by  Sylvia Duckworth  on the reasons to have a personal (or professional) learning network (PLN). The concept is a spin-off from the original 'personal learning environment' that has caught on with the schools and teaching community. Related: why you need to connect with your peers  in the e-learning community.

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From Content Creation to Content Curation: The Importance of Curation

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Tue, 2016-06-14 18:19


Marc Rosenberg, Learning Solutions, Jun 14, 2016

I don't consider what I do in this newsletter to be content curation, but other people do. Either way, I do consider it to be a form of online teaching and learning.  hence the relevance of this article. "Content curation focuses on the accuracy, relevance, usefulness, value, and other aspects of knowledge assets," writes Marc Rosenberg. "Curators are less focused on finding more content than they are on making sure what they have is the right content." Fair enough. But you can see the difference between what I do and what a curator does by looking at the list of ten things a curator should rule out (according to Rosenberg). I will include, while a curator will exclude: things that are wrong, things that are contradictory, things that expire, things that are incomplete, things from disreputable sources, and more. Why? because I am not creating a collection. I am chasing down and wrestling a set of  issues to the ground. It's as much an  investigation as a curation, and it takes me places no curator will go.

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The rise of speculative devices: Hooking up with the bots of Ashley Madison

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Tue, 2016-06-14 15:17


Ben Light, First Monday, Jun 14, 2016

So if you have an online affair with a bot, is it cheating? What if you didn't know it was a bot? What if you could have known (by reading the terms of service) but didn't? These are not idle questions. This paper looks at the use of bots in the dating and hookup site Ashley Madison, which was hacked and 37 million accounts made public in 2015. The bots themselves were called 'Engagers' and the profiles they inhabited were called 'Angels'. Their purpose was to encourage users to sign up for paid services. For this reason they are a class of bots called 'speculative devices' - "those things that are set in place based on a conjecture of an outcome — bots and profiles are seemingly active in Ashley Madison in the hope they will engage users and generate business for example." What's significant about the Ashley Madison case is that "speculative devices are implicated in our ethics." And according to the author, "This raises the question of where morality is delegated to the non-human what do we do when we encounter the unexpected, or when we see harms being caused." Good questions. Part of a special issue of First Monday on Web 2.0.

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