news (external)

The Prime Real Estate of a Library Address

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2018-06-26 02:10

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

We all know the 3 most important attributes when it comes to real estate: location, location, location. Higher education offices are just another form of real estate. And the most valuable real estate on campus is in the library. Today, academic libraries are both physical and digital spaces. As a digital learning person, I care greatly about the services and resources available via browsers and phones – and which can be accessed from anywhere in the world at any time. A robust digital library presence is the enabler of our online learning revolution.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/prime-real-estate-library-address

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UJ introduces 100% online degrees

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2018-06-26 02:04

by Sibahle Malinga, IT Web

The University of Johannesburg (UJ) has introduced 100% online degree programmes as part of its strategy to create a learning ecosystem that aligns with international benchmark institutions. The newly introduced 100% online programmes, according to UJ, are part of the institution’s commitment to provide alternative means of acquiring internationally renowned qualifications available to students who are not able to attend face-to-face lectures.

https://www.itweb.co.za/content/O2rQGMApKRD7d1ea

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Face-to-face versus online training for the interpretation of findings in the fiberoptic endoscopic exam of the swallow procedure

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2018-06-26 02:02

by Susan L Brady, Dove Press open access to scientific and medical research

The aim of this study was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of an online, interdisciplinary, interactive course designed to increase the ability to accurately interpret the fiberoptic endoscopic exam of the swallow (FEES) procedure to traditional, face-to-face (F2F) lectures for both graduate medical education (GME) and graduate speech language pathology (GSLP) programs….  Conclusion: Incorporating technology into GME and GSLP programs yielded comparable gains to traditional lectures. Findings support the use of online education as a viable alternative to the traditional F2F classroom format for the instruction of the cognitive component of the FEES procedure.

https://www.dovepress.com/face-to-face-versus-online-training-for-the-interpretation-of-findings-peer-reviewed-article-AMEP

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Dispelling the misconceptions of online education

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Mon, 2018-06-25 21:04

Jeff Vaklance, Barbara Wilson-Keates, University Affairs, Jun 25, 2018

This is a back-and-forth between Athabasca University and University Affairs magazine. In the original “Online learning isn’t as inclusive as you may think,” University Affairs authors Erin Clow and Klodiana Kolomitro argue that in online learning things like netiquette are set by the instructor, while "community guidelines in a 'traditional' in-person classroom are often set through a collaborative process where both students and faculty are actively engaged." I have never actually seen that in an in-person classroom, but that's what they say. Anyhow, the Athabasca University authors reply that "Virtual learning environments have continued to grow over the last decade and what may have been considered difficult before has now changed."

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]

Yes we can greatly improve the teaching of creativity in Australian schools and yes we can measure it

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Mon, 2018-06-25 20:12

Anne Harris, Leon de Bruin, Australia Association for Research in Education, Jun 25, 2018

The main claim is here: "E. Paul Torrance’s research into intelligence and creativity in school children established clinical links between fluency, flexibility, original thinking and the ability to elaborate on thoughts as markers for creativity." I don't think it's quite that simple. A 50-year study of the Torrence Test "showed that TTCT scores were moderately correlated with personal, but not with public, achievement." I think that the best we can say is that we can measure for proxies of creativity. Anyhow, the authors write that "we are offering new Australian research and practical tools built from the 600+ teachers, principals, and students expressed needs for improving creativity in their classrooms."

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]

The Machine Fired Me

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Mon, 2018-06-25 19:26

Ibrahim Diallo, ID, Jun 25, 2018

It takes a while to figure out what actually happened, as this employee found himself fired with no person having actually done the firing. Hence the title. In fact, his contract had been allowed to elapse by a laid-off employee and an automatic termination routine had kicked in. So he found himself fired with no explanation. The fact that there was a simple and mundane explanation, though, didn't really make up for the fact that the firing was all-encompassing and without appeal. This is the sort of scenario we need to avoid in the automated education and work environment.

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]

Brown University

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Mon, 2018-06-25 18:31

Kathi Fisler, Shriram Krishnamurthi, Brown University, Jun 25, 2018

This is a really good but conceptually difficult essay with an important point to make: there's no one best way to teach computer programming. There's no natural ordering of concepts from foundational to advanced. What we may think are basic concepts are actually very complex. The choice of computer language can impact a student's mental model of what computing is (their 'notional machine'). "The overarching take-away for researchers is to think more deeply about linguistic assumptions and how they interact with pedagogy of prior and current courses. For teachers, we must remember that we choose not just the syntax and IDE in which we will teach; we also choose the pedagogy, problems, and notional machine through which students experience our chosen language." Image: UCL, The principle programming paradigms.

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]

Better Together: Why Networks Are the Future of Learning

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Mon, 2018-06-25 17:18

Tom Vander Ark, Getting Smart, Jun 25, 2018

This post is marketing for a book, so be forewarned. The reasonable point it makes is that " Requiring (and even allowing) individual teachers and schools to develop new learning models is a lousy way to do R&D. We can’t and shouldn’t rely on individual teachers building and delivering lessons for diverse groups of learners." This is something I think we already knew. The article lists some networks - Future Ready Schools, the League of Innovative Schools, New Tech Network or NAF (this list isn't random and at least one is associated with the book author). Here's the thing - a network isn't the same as a group. You can both allow individual teachers to develop their own working models and have them work together in a network - indeed, it works better than way, where you're not trying to coordinate them. And individuals, not organizations (like schools) should be the members of a network.

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]

Digital learning: distraction or default for the future?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Mon, 2018-06-25 15:35

Microsoft Australia Education, Jun 25, 2018

This post is about the use of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) in the classroom. The article references a survey from Barnes and Noble College saying "over 51% of students learn best through active participation, while only 12% are able to listen and learn well." It doesn't follow, though, that being able to "turn and study a model to their heart’s content" results in better learning. Being able to "do" something is not the same thing; it implies narrative, purpose, objectives, challenges or some such thing requiring the student to not only study but to actually practice creating or doing something.

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]

Survey: Most Students Say Online Learning Is as Good or Better Than Face-to-Face

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2018-06-25 02:10

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

In a survey of 1,500 students who are seriously considering, currently enrolled in or recently graduated from a fully online program, most (86 percent) considered the value of their degree equal to or greater than the cost they paid to take it. Among those who have attended face-to-face and online courses, the majority (85 percent) said that online learning is as good as or better than attending courses on campus. In fact, two-thirds of online college students (67 percent) reported that they’d achieved the original goal that motivated them to enroll in their program; graduate students were more likely than undergraduates to feel that way (76 percent vs. 62 percent). The survey was conducted by Learning House, a company that manages online programs for colleges and universities, and Aslanian Market Research, a research arm of EducationDynamics, which performs student prospecting and enrollment management.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/06/18/most-students-say-online-learning-is-as-good-or-better-than-face-to-face.aspx

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Online Course Creation for Dummies

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2018-06-25 02:03

By Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

Developers at Penn State believe their new tool will make creating online courses easier than ever, even for the non-tech savvy.  Creating an online course requires time, patience, ingenuity — and, often, technical expertise beyond the grasp of many instructors accustomed to teaching primarily face-to-face. Developers at Pennsylvania State University’s main campus have created a tool they think will address the latter hurdle. The Headless Authoring Experience (HAX) organizes in a single browser screen all the functions necessary to create an online course or an open educational resource. Its aim, according to Bryan Ollendyke, an instructional technology systems developer, is to make the creation of online courses possible even for instructors with limited technical capabilities. “HAX is basically a way to let people write really complex HTML without having any idea that that’s what they’re doing,” Ollendyke said.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/06/13/open-source-tool-aims-make-online-course-creation-accessible-all

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Scaling programs that support unique needs of online students

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2018-06-25 02:02

By James Paterson, Campus Technology
Colleges must support online offerings with many of the same initiatives they offer to on-campus students, though some programs may need to be tailored to the online learner’s unique needs, according to three officials at the Arizona State University who are helping to shepherd the online university, which is a priority with the university. Writing in The evolllution, the three suggest that Arizona State actively recruits online learners with approaches that best suit them, including communications through various media, unobtrusive automated contact technology that can be easily customized, and a website that fully informs the students and allows for a growing number of “stealth applicants” who interact with the admissions office very little or not at all. University officials also make close connections to the business community for these students. The authors suggest that colleges can support them with initiatives such as student services and online communities, noting that research shows the top reasons online learners drop out they feel the university doesn’t care about them.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/scaling-programs-that-support-unique-needs-of-online-students/525435/

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Statistik der schwerbehinderten Menschen

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Mon, 2018-06-25 00:00

Die im Informationssystem eingespeicherten gestaltbaren Tabellen aus der Statistik der schwerbehinderten Menschen wurden um das Jahr 2017 ergänzt.

Categories: Science News

"Nursing Informatics"[MeSH]; +21 new citations

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sun, 2018-06-24 21:14

21 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

"Nursing Informatics"[MeSH]

These pubmed results were generated on 2018/06/24

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Categories: nursing informatics

Udacity and Google Launch Free Online Career Courses

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2018-06-24 02:10

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology
Google and Udacity have teamed up to offer 12 free career courses for recent graduates, mid-career professionals and those re-entering the workforce. The duo tested out the concept in March, when Udacity launched a “Networking for Career Success” course for 60,000 “Grow with Google” learners in Europe and the United States. The Grow with Google program is an initiative to help students and teachers, business owners, job seekers, startup operators and developers get better at what they do. Now 12 courses have been produced, and the classes have been opened to everybody.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/06/12/udacity-and-google-launch-free-online-career-courses.aspx?admgarea=news

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The Number of Students Taking Online Courses Is Quickly Rising, But Perceptions Are Changing Slowly

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2018-06-24 02:04

By Jenny Abamu, EdSurge

Researchers that have looked into public perceptions of online learning note that over the last 15 years views inched in a more positive direction, evidenced by the increase of students enrolling in courses and surveys given to pupils and professors. A Gallup poll conducted back in 2015, found that 46 percent of Americans “strongly agree” or “agree” that online colleges and universities offer a high-quality education—up 30 percent from when the poll was conducted in 2011. However, researchers caveat these findings, noting that these perception changes happen within particular pockets and are sometimes the result of strategic practices, such as universities not listing the medium of learning on student transcripts.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-06-12-the-number-of-students-taking-in-online-courses-is-quickly-rising-but-perceptions-are-changing-slowly

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Price Matters but Doesn’t Rule

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2018-06-24 02:02

by Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed

Issues of price and perceived value are increasingly central in many discussions of higher education, as tuitions climb and public questioning of higher education intensifies. The survey comes at matters of price from several angles, to try to “add nuance” to the topic, as the Learning House’s Andrew J. Magda put it. Tuition and fees easily outdistanced other reasons when respondents listed their three “most important factors” in choosing a specific online program, with 34 percent saying that, followed by program reputation (13 percent), reputation of the college (11 percent) and location of the institution (11 percent).

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/06/13/online-students-price-matters-doesnt-dictate-choice

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The End Of The Internet As We Know It…Could It Happen?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2018-06-24 00:31

Deirdre O’Donnell, Evolving Science, Jun 23, 2018

Over the years news media publishers in Europe have tried repeatedly to end the practice of people linking to their stories. Their reasoning (I think) is that readers should come to the newspaper websites directly. Currently legislation being proposed is the closest yet to accomplishing this. " Article 11 of the proposal would require anyone who wants to share a link, even containing a short line from a news story or headline, from a publisher who provides such content, will need a specific license from the said publisher before doing so." Obviously that's not possible for me with OLDaily. So I'm hoping the legislation is unsuccessful. More: ZDNet explores the impact of the proposelaw on open source.

Web: [Direct Link] [This Post]

"Nursing Informatics"[MeSH]; +22 new citations

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Sat, 2018-06-23 15:14

22 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results:

"Nursing Informatics"[MeSH]

These pubmed results were generated on 2018/06/23

PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Categories: nursing informatics

Crowder starts new program to lighten the load on students

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2018-06-23 02:10

By: Ashley Godwin, Four States

Crowder College administration is seeing a pattern of students balancing course work with other priorities, but they have found a way to help.  Through a Title 3 grant, Crowder is implementing a new style of higher educational learning called uConnect where students can still be considered a full-time student, but not take so many classes at once. “So for example when I take 15 credit hours a semester that’s usually 5 classes. The first 8 weeks I’ll do two of those classes and then the next 8 weeks I’ll do the other three classes, so I’m still getting my 15 hours a semester, but I’m only studying two or three subjects at a time,” says Cindy Brown. “You have time to breathe. You have a lot of time to breathe, and just take a step back, because you need that for your mental health,” says Amy Leyva. Crowder will start uConnect this fall. And with technology becoming more prevalent in education, as the program progresses, Crowder is looking to add online or partial online classes.

 

http://www.fourstateshomepage.com/news/crowder-starts-new-program-to-lighten-the-load-on-students/1237539490

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