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Tag des brandverletzten Kindes am 07.12. 2014

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Sun, 2014-11-30 23:00
Ausgewählte Informationen zum Tag des brandverletzten Kindes am 07.12. 2014
Categories: Science News

Beyond Hello: Ignite Your Passion for Discovery

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2014-11-30 20:01
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Dean Shareski, Ideas, Thoughts, Nov 30, 2014

This is a nice project that is worth a nod. Dean Shareski is traveling across Canada hosting evenings where educators can gather and share stories with each other. The program is called Beyond Hello: Ignite your Passion for Discovery, and is sponsored by the Discovery Education Network. "These 5 minute talks take a great deal of work to develop and while short in duration, impact folks for long after the event," he writes. Voluntary informal learning in a pub: if it can work for teachers, it can work for anyone.

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iDEA Programme Badges – Recognising Digital Skills

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2014-11-30 20:01
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Andrew Robertson, Microsoft UK Schools Blog, Nov 30, 2014

So, should you be given a badge for instantiating a particular political perspective, or espousing a particular philosophy? One would think not. But this program comes dangerously close to that line, close enough that it gives pause for thought. "The iDEA Programme (Inspiring Digital Enterprise Award) and the partnership with the Nominet Trust and the Duke of York, which aims to support young people who have a creative spark of entrepreneurship... here is a competition to find the best digital business ideas... (it) also offers young people the opportunity to learn skills and earn recognised badges that will not only help them when and idea comes to them, but also improve their employability."

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Competency Education in a K-16+ World

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2014-11-30 20:01
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Jonathan VanderEls, Connected Principals, Nov 30, 2014

The redefinition of learning as defined by outcomes rather than process is in full swing and there are proponents and opponents equally. I think the debate boils down to two sentences: first, competency-based education can support student learning as evidenced by good test scores (that's what this post shows), but second, is that all there is to an education? But maybe we're thinking of this incorrectly. If we can obtain the learning outcomes we desire using competency-based learning, and if (as a bonus) this can save time and money, then shouldn't we be asking what else we can do in education? Can we build community, immerse students in authentic experiences, give time for play and exploration, foster metacognitive skills? Let's call this model of learning "Competency-Plus".

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Homemade Ice Cream in a Bag!

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2014-11-30 17:01
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daffyskies, YouTube, Nov 30, 2014

This video teaches you how to make ice cream, and along the way, teaches you an interesting scientific principle. It's yet another example of how you can learn anything online. Best of all, the author writes: "This was a school assignment and my first time using iMovie :)" Perfect.

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Knowledge as Recognition

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2014-11-30 05:01


Stephen Downes, Half an Hour, Nov 29, 2014

This is a short essay I wrote as a contribution to Philosophy 12, a high school philosophy class. I tried to structure the paper according to the requirements of the assignment (keeping in mind that I haven't studied any of the lessons in the class and can only guess what authors and theories they covered). The assignment was to "state and support a proposition of personal knowledge" and in my case the proposition I wished to support was the idea that 'knowledge' is not some sort of propositional attitude, that is, not a justified and true opinion or belief, but rather, the result of what Hume would call 'custom and habit'. This is a view I have advanced in the past, but never in this exact form, so I thought it was worth sharing.

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Online Learning: Outcomes and Satisfaction among Underprepared Students in an Upper-Level Psychology Course

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2014-11-30 01:07

by Dr. Colleen McDonough, et al; OJDLA

Online learning is on the rise, but research on outcomes and student satisfaction has produced conflicting results, and systematic, targeted research on underprepared college students is generally lacking. This study compared three sections (traditional, online, and 50% hybrid) of the same upper-level psychology course, taught with identical materials by the same instructor. Although exam scores were marginally higher in the traditional course, final grades and written assignments did not differ across sections, nor did student satisfaction. Student engagement predicted outcomes online. Taken together, these results suggest that outcomes and satisfaction are equivalent in online, hybrid, and traditional courses, and that a student’s own diligence and drive might better predict success in online learning.

http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/fall173/mcdonough_roberts_hummel173.html

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Increasing Accessibility: Using Universal Design Principles to Address Disability Impairments in the Online Learning Environment

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2014-11-30 01:05

by Candice N. Pittman & April K. Heiselt, OJDLA

With the increasing number of students enrolling in distance education, there is a need to consider the accessibility of course materials in online learning environments. Four major groups of disabilities: mobility, auditory, visual, and cognitive are explored as they relate to their implementation into instructional design and their impact on students in online learning, specifically for students with disabilities. This article highlights the ways in which universal design can assist in providing increased accessibility, not only for students with disabilities, but for all students in the online learning environment. Current standards for disability instruction and guidelines for creating accessible materials are shared.
http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/fall173/pittman_heiselt173.html

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7 Ways Tech Can Raise Student Success Rates [#Infographic]

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2014-11-30 01:02

by D. Frank Smith, EdTech

From blended learning to analytics, an educational technology investment organization is identifying what works in classrooms. Pressure is mounting for colleges and universities to boost student graduation rates. At the same time, many see developing and scaling up learning technologies as a valuable strategy for keeping students engaged in the classroom and promoting success. A recent infographic from Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC) identifies several ways technology can aid student success. The organization awards grants for technology solutions in education, including blended learning initiatives and learning analytics.

http://www.edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2014/11/7-ways-tech-can-raise-student-success-rates-infographic

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A Scalable and Sustainable Approach to Open Access Publishing and Archiving for Humanities and Social Sciences

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2014-11-29 23:01
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Rebecca Kennison, Lisa Norberg, KN Consultants, Nov 29, 2014

I'm not really sure how much I support this - the idea of centralizing the system does not really appeal to me - but anything is better than the current system, and the proposal does address the problems inherent in the open access model based on individual payments made by researchers to publishers. By contrast, the proposal authors write, "Our model, in contrast, asks tertiary institutions to contribute to systemic support of the research process itself, including its entire scholarly output — whether article, monograph, dataset, conference presentation, multimodal Web site, or format not yet envisioned. Our model looks to societies to play a central role within the scholarly communication ecosystem, and for academic libraries to become true partners with them." A white paper (83 page PDF) is available.

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Can Digital ‘Badges’ and ‘Nanodegrees’ Protect Job Seekers From a First-Round Knockout?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2014-11-29 23:01
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Steve Kolowich, Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov 29, 2014

This is a bit of a twist on the Chronicle's anti-technology bias: alternative credentials, such as badges, are not useful because robots do most of the hiring anyways, and they only look at the name of the institution and the degree. "The key to avoiding the early cull has gone from impressing a busy human being to gaming an exacting algorithm." That said, as Alex Halavais comments in the article, "Outside of IT, there is a lot of resistance to badges... I would never recommend that they use badges within a traditional hiring process— e.g., on a ré sumé ." Badges need that critical application to create wider take-up.

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Innovating Pedagogy 2014

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2014-11-29 23:01
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Mike Sharples, Open University, Nov 29, 2014

The Open University has released the 2014 edition of its 'Innovating Pedagogy' report. It's set up much like the Horizon Report, and so has its strengths and flaws. In particular, while it is capable of insight (such as the discussion around threshold concept' it has the flaw of predicting events that have already happened ('flipped classroom', 'learning by storytelling') and predictive hackney ('learning to learn'). I think the time scales are pretty random. I list only the first of eight authors.

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Kings of the Cashtag – Analysing cashtags using a social media monitoring tool

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2014-11-29 20:01


Richard Sunley, TalkWalker Blog, Nov 29, 2014

I hadn't heard of 'cashtags' before but they do sound like a good idea (I have heard of  TalkWalker and subscribe to a number of their alerts). "Created by using the dollar sign ($) and a company’ s stock ticker symbol (e.g. $AAPL is Apple’ s cashtag) cashtags are a method of highlighting Twitter conversations that relate to a particular company’ s stock." It makes me wonder what other sorts of tags we could create. Like 'bangtags' to specify language. Or the 'smashtag', made from a percent sign, to tell people you're not interested in a topic - tell people 'no more brunch pictures' like this: %brunch (see  here - language warning). And why not use the 'hat tag' for a Hat-Tip, instead of the clumsy H/T, to credit someone for an idea or link. Like this: ^@cogdogblog. Or what about the 'asktag', to footnote addresses, references, or additional information. For example, "It will be a nice day tomorrow. *snow" means that by 'nice' what I really mean is that it will snow.

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No script for rhizomatic learning

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2014-11-29 20:01
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Jenny Mackness, Weblog, Nov 29, 2014

Teens always have posters in their rooms (those who can afford posters and rooms, at least) and I was no exception. One of the first posters in my own room was a Turner -  this one - and he remains one of my favourite artists. That's why I'm interested in the film, Mr. Turner. But I'm also interested in this commentary from Jenny Mackness, which describes the process of making the film. There was no script or roles or scenes or anything else.  Mike Leigh says, "I say, come and be in my film. Can’ t tell you what it’ s about. I can’ t tell you what your character is. We’ ll invent that as part of the process. And you will never know any more than your character knows." Which of course is one of the core ideas behind the MOOCs that we've built as well.

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Learn from Coursera on your next JetBlue flight

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2014-11-29 20:01
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Unattributed, Coursera Blog, Nov 29, 2014

It's perhaps a small matter to put videos on a video service, but it's something else again to convince an airline to feature your free content on its inflight video service. So kudos to Coursera for pulling this off! Of course, you'll need to be working on next-generation inflight services, the way NRC is, if you want to put actual courses and learning resources on the system. So if you're an e-learning company and are interested in the possibility of putting  learning and performance support into in-flight working and travelling, send me a note. I can't make any guarantees, but this is the place to start thinking about it.

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OLDaily Reader Survey

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2014-11-29 20:01


Stephen Downes, OLDaily, Nov 29, 2014

Do you read OLDaily? Would you like to send me your opinions? This is your chance!  Click on the link to go to my 2014 OLDaily reader survey and let me know what you think. Thanks!

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Gender Mainstreaming Toolkit for Teachers and Teacher Educators

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2014-11-29 17:01


Sibyl Frei, Sevilla Leowinata, Commonwealth of Learning, Nov 29, 2014

I haven't heard the term 'gender mainstreaming' before, but this workbook has worthwhile objectives:

  • "improving the access, participation, success and decision-making of girls and women in education
  • "to show why gender equality is important to students, teachers, schools, communities and
    governments, and"
  • to show "how teachers, education institutions and other stakeholders can make changes that
    will help both girls and boys participate in and succeed at school."

I also like the way the document draws a clear relation between gender equality and poverty. "Much has been written about how educating a girl will benefit her whole family and her community. Research has shown that investing in education improves the health of mothers and children, enhances the social and economic situation of families and communities and leads to a better future."

 

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Community Radio Continuous Improvement Toolkit, Version 2.0

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2014-11-29 17:01
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Vinod Pavarala, Kanchan K. Malik, Vasuki Belavadi, Aditya Deshbandhu, Preeti Raghunath, Commonwealth Educational Media Centre for Asia (CEMCA), Nov 29, 2014

Regular readers of OLDaily know how much I love radio, and community radio has to be one of my favourite versions of the medium. The primary purpose of community radio is to provide access to all to the public airwaves. To do this they "promote access to media facilities and to training, production and distribution facilities as a primary step towards full democratisation of the communication system" and "offer the opportunity to any member of the community to initiate communication and participate in programme making and evaluation, encouraging local creative talent and foster local traditions." The "are motivated by community well-being, not commercial considerations" and "promote the right to communicate, assist the free flow of information and opinions, encourage creative expression and contribute to the democratic process and a pluralist society." All that means that the process of participating in a community radio station is at least as important as the product they put on the air. This is also the model I have employed in the creation of  community newspapers, and the model I follow when  developing tools and  systems for online learning.

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The TIPS Framework Version-2.0 : Quality Assurance Guidelines for Teachers as Creators of Open Educational Resources

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2014-11-29 17:01
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Paul Kawachi, Commonwealth Educational Media Centre for Asia (CEMCA), Nov 29, 2014

I'm not so happy with this resource as I am with some of the other resources produced by the Commonwealth Educational Media Centre for Asia (CEMCA). The quality framework the author employs is based on the concept of 'fit for purpose', which is fair enough, but the purpose emphasized is use by educators and publishers. So before even discussing the quality framework there is a long discussion of licensing which repeats the fallacious argument "for public funding and international philanthropic funding to create the OER initially and then allow private enterprise to localise OER and deliver afterwards." The term 'private enterprise' in this is a codeword for 'charge the user'. But if government can pay producers to produce the resource, why can't it pay translators and distributors to distribute the resource? How does it make sense to shift the cost of this to people who have little or no money?

The remainder of the assessment framework is equally trite. For example, we have the dubious assertion that "All the known learning objectives can be categorised into one of the five domains: the Cognitive, the Affective, the Metacognitive, the Environment, and the Management Domain." Similarly, we have the "38 criteria... presented here as the 2014 TIPS Framework version 2.0." These criteria include "You should clearly state the reason and purpose of the OER, its relevance and importance," "Stimulate the intrinsic motivation to learn, eg through arousing curiosity with surprising anecdotes," "Try to offer learning support." This tells me most of all that the author doesn't understand the meaning of the word "criteria". And we have the mis-applied content validity ratio, from Lawse (1975). 40 page PDF.

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Case Studies on OER-based eLearning

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sat, 2014-11-29 17:01


Som Naidu, Sanjaya Mishra, Shironica Karunanayaka, G. Mythili, S.K. Prasad, Mohan B. Menon, Commonwealth Educational Media Centre for Asia (CEMCA), Nov 29, 2014

There are four case studies provided: "Integrating OER in a Teacher Education Course," from Sri Lanka; "OER-based Post Graduate Diploma in e-Learning," from India; "National Institute of Open Schooling – Open Educational Resource Initiative," also from India; and "Developing a Fully OER-based Course," from Malaysia. 56 page PDF. I think these provide a fairly wide cross-section of the application of OERs in learning, though I would have liked to have seen an OER-based MOOC study, and a case where learners themselves directly accessed and used OERs independently, as this is probably the widest use of OERs generally.

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