news (external)

10 higher ed blogs worth the quick read in 2016

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Thu, 2016-01-21 01:08

By Meris Stansbury, eCampus News

Deep thinkers in the higher ed-tech world share their thoughts on reinvention, the new IT model, management changes, and what really works in the classroom. Though Twitter is always good for a quick one-sentence thought-and-reply, it’s still blogs that evoke not only the most thoughtful opinion summations from its authors, but also attract a community committed to engaging in meaningful dialogue: two characteristics that lend well to higher education.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/higher-ed-blogs-277/

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4 Trends That Will Recharge Higher Ed IT in 2016

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Thu, 2016-01-21 01:04

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

These ideas and technologies are jolting the education segment from the outside in. Heavy adoption of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) are at the top of many prediction lists. “2016 is the year these puppies will actually roll out to the general public,” declared Yahoo Finance reporter Andy Serwer. The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) featured some four dozen exhibitors serving this segment in two separate marketplaces, “gaming and virtual reality” and “augmented reality.” The Consumer Technology Association, which runs that event, expects sales of headsets to reach 1.2 million units this year.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/01/14/4-trends-that-will-recharge-higher-ed-it-in-2016.aspx

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‘Academic crowdsourcing’ allows lecturers to share ideas

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Thu, 2016-01-21 01:02

By Jon Marcus, Times Higher Education

Two networks in Australia and the US backed by the same start-up technology are blazing a new teaching trail. “Academic crowdsourcing is what I’m calling it,” said Nicholas Hawkins of the University of Queensland, head of the Biomedical Education Skills and Training network (BEST), through which the virtual lab was made available. That network has now been followed by a similar operation based at Arizona State University in the US, driven by technology from the same start-up company and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to improve basic science instruction. It is a mirror image of the massive open online course, or Mooc; instead of connecting huge numbers of students, it connects large numbers of teachers to collaborate in ways that academics have not traditionally practised.

https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/academic-crowdsourcing-allows-lecturers-share-ideas

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Online Students Do Not Learn By Video Alone, Finds Study

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Wed, 2016-01-20 01:05

By Paul Riismandel, Streaming Media

Streamed lectures, it turns out, are a poor replacement for classroom learning. To help students absorb what they hear, add interactive activities to the curriculum. Recently, five researchers from Carnegie Mellon University decided to test out what difference extra activities make on learning outcomes inside a massive open online course, or MOOC. The title of their study belies their conclusion: “Learning Is Not a Spectator Sport: Doing Is Better Than Watching for Learning From a MOOC.” They tested a 12-week introductory MOOC in psychology that featured 10- to 15-minute lecture videos as part of the instructional content along with weekly quizzes to measure progress. Looking just at the final, the average score of the students who used the OLI activities was nine points higher than the students who didn’t: 66 points vs. 57 points. Many more students completed the interactive course, too; 939 of the OLI students took the final exam, while only 215 of the students in the non-OLI version did.

http://www.streamingmedia.com/Articles/Editorial/Featured-Articles/Online-Students-Do-Not-Learn-By-Video-Alone-Finds-Study-108552.aspx

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NC Community Colleges Skip 4-Year Nursing Degree

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Wed, 2016-01-20 01:03

by WLOS

The state’s community college board on Friday opted against launching a feasibility study into the pros and cons of offering a four-year nursing degree. About a half-dozen states offer advanced nursing education at community colleges. A study by community college leaders and health-industry groups said the idea is one way to reach a goal of 80 percent of nurses holding four-year degrees by 2020 as the health care environment gets more complex. The community college board decided instead to develop online learning and expand the ability of graduates to earn nursing degrees from a public university.

http://www.wlos.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/NC-Community-Colleges-Skip-4-Year-Nursing-Degree-250815.shtml

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The Faculty Role Online, Scrutinized

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Wed, 2016-01-20 01:02

by Paul Fain, Inside Higher Ed

Accreditors and the department of education are in charge of determining whether a distance education program meets federal requirements for faculty interaction. The inspector general recently has issued rebukes to both the feds and a regional accreditor for their review of competency-based programs related to this question. Previous audits from the inspector general have questioned whether some competency-based programs should be classified as correspondence courses. That question appears to be at the center of the office’s inquiry into Western Governors, which is a nonprofit.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/01/15/education-departments-inspector-generals-high-stakes-audit-western-governors-u

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Palindrome

xkcd.com - Wed, 2016-01-20 01:00
Categories: Cartoons, Science News

Zahnmedizinische Gruppenprophylaxe

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Tue, 2016-01-19 23:00

Die im Informationssystem eingespeicherten gestaltbaren Tabellen aus den "Epidemiologischen Begleituntersuchungen zur zahnmedizinischen Gruppenprophylaxe " der Deutschen Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Jugendzahnpflege e.V. wurden um das Jahr 2013/2014 ergänzt.

Categories: Science News

Why You Should Care That MOOCs Had a Great 2015

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2016-01-19 01:10

by Bravetta Hassell, Chief Learning Officer

Massive open online courses were hot last year — growing by more than 17 million students since 2014. Growth is still climbing, as is perceived value and prices. Driven by increased platform connectivity and device-based computing adoption, as well as the emergence of online and collaborative learning and technology personalization, Reportlinker estimates the MOOC market to grow by nearly $7 billion by 2020. Self-paced courses are getting a boost. About half of all courses listed on Class Central don’t have a start date per se, which indicates a growing trend toward customer-friendly services. “In 2016, we can expect to see a lot more credentials and credits,” Shah wrote in edSurge.com post. “But as MOOC providers try to aggressively monetize, early adopters may find that critical components of the learning experience will no longer be free.”

http://www.clomedia.com/articles/6673-why-you-should-care-that-moocs-had-a-great–

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National survey provides first clear look at competency-based ed

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2016-01-19 01:04

by Tara García Mathewson, Education Dive

A survey of the shared design elements and emerging practices of competency-based education programs by Public Agenda, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates and Lumina foundations, gives perhaps the clearest view yet of competency-based education in U.S. higher education. According to eCampus News, the more than 170 respondents had near universal agreement on four design elements: using clear, cross-cutting and specialized competencies, having measurable and meaningful assessments, creating proficient and prepared graduates, and being learner-centered. The most commonly experienced challenges of developing CBE programs include using data systems that are automated and compatible with one another, designing pricing models to be compatible with financial aid, and securing the confidence of external stakeholders in the quality of the credential.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/national-survey-provides-first-clear-look-at-competency-based-ed/412134/

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The Future Of Leadership Development? A Fireside Chat With IESE’s Learning Innovation Unit

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2016-01-19 01:02

by Adam Gordon, Forbes

Omni-learning continuously and digitally integrates all real and virtual learning sites –classroom, workplace, customers’ premises and beyond. The concept owes much to data-tracking adaptive feedback systems that have emerged in other industries, for example Fitbit wearables that track health and fitness activity and provide ongoing interaction with peers and feedback to doctors. Or, similarly, Waze (a Google company) which aggregates continuous distributed peer imputs about the state of traffic into knowledge that guides driver choices. Kaganer and Aurrichio isolate three key features of omni-learning: Continuous and Cross-Context. Learner-Led. Data-driven.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/adamgordon/2016/01/14/executive-learning-iese/#2715e4857a0b677b408a2b41

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Neues Krankenhausverzeichnis

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Mon, 2016-01-18 23:00
Seit heute steht ein aktualisiertes "Verzeichnis der Krankenhäuser und Vorsorge- oder Rehabilitationseinrichtungen in Deutschland (Stand 31.12.2014)" zur Verfügung.
Das Statistische Bundesamt bietet Ihnen auf der Themenseite Gesundheit eine kostenlose Leseprobe an (Zur Leseprobe), anhand derer Sie sich über Aufbau und Informationsgehalt des Verzeichnisses informieren können.
Bei Interesse an dieser kostenpflichtigen Veröffentlichung zum Preis von 49 Euro schicken Sie bitte eine E-Mail mit der Rechnungsanschrift an gesundheit@destatis.de .
Categories: Science News

Welt-Lepra-Tag am 25.01.2016

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Mon, 2016-01-18 23:00
Ausgewählte Informationen zum Welt-Lepra-Tag am 25.01.2016
Categories: Science News

Previously thought impossible: Body cells transfer genetic information directly into sperm cells

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Mon, 2016-01-18 21:48


Sayer Ji, Sign of the Times (SOTT), Jan 18, 2016

I've discussed this before. Lamarkian evolution is a theory that posits that "an organism can pass on characteristics it has acquired during its lifetime to its offspring." Jean-Baptiste Lamarck and  Erasmus Darwin were key figures in the development of evolution in the late 1700s, a theory Erasmus's grandson, Charles, would advance with the theory of natural selection. Lamarck's theories regarding use and disuse would be adopted by the younger darwin, but his ideas on 'soft inheritance' based on environmental factors were rejected more or less definitively by  August Weismann in the 1880s. But what if Lamarck was right, and what if the impact of emvironment and experience  can be passed down from one generation to the next? That's what this experiment suggests. "This work reveals that a flow of information can be transferred from the soma to the germline, escaping the principle of the Weismann barrier." Study on PLoS One.

[Link] [Comment]

Udacity Promises Refund if You Don’t Get a Job

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2016-01-18 01:08

by Cade Metz, Wired

Udacity, the online educational service founded by artificial intelligence guru and ex-Googler Sebastian Thrun, is offering a new set of tech degrees that guarantee a job in six months or your money back. Starting today, the Silicon Valley-based startup is attaching this money-back guarantee to four of its online courses, courses designed to train machine learning engineers and software developers that build apps for Google Android devices, Apple iOS devices, and the web. These online courses typically span about 9 months and required about 10 hours of study per week, and they’re priced at $299 a pop. That’s about $100 above the company’s usual fee, but the idea is that students will also work closely with specialists that can help them prepare for interviews and find a job after their degree is complete.

http://www.wired.com/2016/01/udacity-coding-courses-guarantee-a-job-or-your-money-back/

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Longer Than Usual

xkcd.com - Mon, 2016-01-18 01:00
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Categories: Cartoons, Science News

Platform Cooperativism: Challenging the Corporate Sharing Economy

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2016-01-17 18:41


Trebor Scholz, Rosa Luxemberg Siftung, Jan 17, 2016

"Despite all the scrumptious, home-cooked convenience of the 'sharing economy,'" writes Trebor Scholz, "we may end up sharing the scraps, not the economy." It's time for an alternative, he writes, and this alternative is the platform cooperative - a mechanism that employs the efficiencies of the internet for the benefit of the people doing the work, not some third party who simply owns a platform. "Silicon Valley loves a good disruption, so let’ s give them one." Good overview with descriptions of mechanisms and underlying principles. 32 page PDF. See also the Platform Cooperativism website.

I've run my own experiments in platform cooperativism with the foundation of the Moncton Free Press. It hasn't gone as well as I would have liked, though I think it's performing a valuable service for the community. It needs more care and attention than I've been able to give it. And it needs, most of all, a revenue stream and a way of paying contributors and staff. But I think it's there, and if the NRC gig doesn't work out, I always have this to fall back on. Platform cooperativism is also a model for learning technology that does more than exploit students and authors for private sector gain.

[Link] [Comment]

The truth about “1 Like = 1 Prayer” posts on Facebook

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2016-01-17 18:41


Craig Charles, Techexplained, Jan 17, 2016

A question I've received a lot recently revolves around why I want a distributed network rather than a centralized system like Facebook or Twitter. To me, the answer is very clear: systems that depend on mass, like Facebook (or Twitter, or Google search, or presidential elections) are systems where group affinity is manipulated for private wealth and gain. A classic example of this is the prototypical Facebook 'like and share' campaign. The people who distribute these care nothing about whether you want to save the whales, campaign against corruption, or promote gun rights. What they care about is accumulating a huge number of ;likes and shares' around a page, which they can then monetize. The next time you click 'like' on a Facebook meme, think about that.

[Link] [Comment]

Why People Get More Stupid in a Crowd

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Sun, 2016-01-17 18:41


Michael Bond, BBC | Future, Jan 17, 2016

Close to ten years ago I was in the middle of clarifying my thinking on what I called at the time 'groups and networks' in papers like  That Group Feeling and talks like Groups vs Networks: the Class Struggle Continues. The post looks at a study examining part of my message in those talks: "Group conformity stands in marked contrast to the 'wisdom of crowds effect, whereby aggregating the opinions of large numbers of people gives answers or predictions more accurate than those of any individual. This happens only when members of a crowd make their judgements independently of each other, and it is most effective when a crowd is diverse" (of course it's not just my message; a lot of people think this). So, interesting. More about Daniel Richardson’ s research.

[Link] [Comment]

How to Impress Employers With Online Courses

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2016-01-17 01:10

By Arnie Fertig, US News

If you’re unemployed, online classes can be a cheap way to show potential employers that your skills are fresh. “The world of work is changing faster than ever before, whether because of technology, automation or globalization. So, people need to keep up,” says Dennis Yang, CEO of Udemy. He’s right. In today’s economy, virtually nothing is done the way it was 20, 10 or even five years ago. And that applies to the way we learn as well. If you are unemployed, taking online courses and gaining certifications can be an inexpensive way to demonstrate that you possess the initiative to keep yourself up-to-date. Companies, such as Udemy, Coursera and LinkedIn’s Lynda, are among the major players in the diverse, growing and still-being-defined territory of online learning. Each has a different payment model and platform type. But they offer viable ways for you to learn a new skill, design or master a piece of software, figure out how to begin a business and more.

http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/articles/2016-01-12/how-to-impress-employers-with-online-courses

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