news (external)

New York: Weniger Ratten als Menschen

ScienceTicker.Info - Tue, 2014-11-04 14:57
Um die Stadt New York ranken sich viele Mythen. Zumindest mit einem davon glaubt ein amerikanischer Statistiker nun aufräumen zu können. Laut seiner unkonventionellen Studie leben im „Big Apple“ etwa 2 Millionen Ratten. Die verbreitete Annahme, auf jeden der 8 Millionen New Yorker komme eine Ratte, stellt demnach eine Übertreibung dar.
Categories: Science News

Sozialhilfe - Empfänger/-innen Grundsicherung im Alter und bei Erwerbsminderung

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Tue, 2014-11-04 07:00

Die im Informationssystem eingespeicherten gestaltbaren Tabellen aus der "Statistik der Sozialhilfe - Empfänger/-innen von Grundsicherung im Alter und bei Erwerbsminderung" des Statistischen Bundesamtes wurden um die Angaben des Jahres 2013 ergänzt.

Categories: Science News

Technology provides higher education with a bright future

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2014-11-04 01:05

by Georgia Institute of Technology

The Georgia Institute of Technology organized a national media roundtable Thursday to discuss the current state of online learning in higher education and how technology will help shape its future. Georgia Tech Provost Rafael L. Bras hosted a nationa media roundtable on Technology and the Future of Online Higher Education at the Carnegie Corporation of New York in New York City. Provost Rafael L. Bras hosted the event, “Technology and the Future of Online Higher Education,” at the Carnegie Corporation of New York’s headquarters in New York City. There was universal agreement that technology maneuvered higher education to a new trajectory where teaching and learning is changing for the better.

http://www.ecnmag.com/news/2014/10/technology-provides-higher-education-bright-future

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Cyber High School Will Allow Students To Attend Via Avatars

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2014-11-04 01:02

By JOHN D’AMICO, Wall Street Journal

A high school in Japan will allow students to attend via virtual avatar starting next spring. Meisei Cyber, an initiative of private Meisei High School in Chiba prefecture, said it would offer classes and tests via computer, smartphone or tablet in a three-year high school curriculum. Students will watch prerecorded lectures from Meisei’s teaching staff, each running around 25 minutes. For four days per year, students must attend schooling at Meisei in person. The rest of the year, students are free to study at their own pace, and they can adopt an avatar as their identity just as videogamers would do in a role-playing game. In their free time, students can communicate in the guise of their avatar with other students, perhaps to “consult on studying or tests” or “enjoy student life,” according to Meisei’s website.

http://blogs.wsj.com/japanrealtime/2014/10/24/cyber-high-school-will-allow-students-to-attend-as-avatars/

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Higher education is gearing up for its future

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Tue, 2014-11-04 01:01

by Thomas Keon, Northwest Indiana Times

The ubiquitous nature of technology leads to the frequent comparison of bricks and mortar versus online learning. While socialization of our traditional age college students is underestimated today, the art of building personal networks often takes place at traditional colleges. Many colleges are trending toward online courses and degrees. Some are doing so out of desperation. Others are keeping options open and taking advantage of delivery systems that can enhance learning. And, of course, some colleges are strictly online. We will see some colleges emerging and others failing over the next 10 years. Keep in mind, changing the direction of a university, like any large organization, takes significant time.

http://www.nwitimes.com/news/opinion/columnists/guest-commentary/guest-commentary-higher-education-is-gearing-up-for-its-future/article_a63cf126-1cea-54f1-9958-3bf6c8e3f8fb.html

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Liposomen: Köder für Bakterien-Gifte

ScienceTicker.Info - Mon, 2014-11-03 12:05
Neu entwickelte Liposomen lassen sich gegen schwere bakterielle Infektionen einsetzen. Im Tierversuch überlebten Mäuse dank der Liposomen eine sonst tödliche Blutvergiftung. Die Nager wurden ohne Antibiotika wieder gesund. Die Nanopartikel könnten helfen, Antibiotika-Resistenzen zu vermeiden, sagt eine internationale Forschergruppe.
Categories: Science News

Why AT&T Is Investing in Virtual School

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2014-11-03 01:10

By Natalie Kitroeff, BusinessWeek

It made sense that the Georgia Institute of Technology launched an online-only computer science degree in January of this year. It was less obvious what was in it for its two corporate partners: Udacity and AT&T. Sure, Udacity is an online education company. But the company’s founder, former Google (GOOG) vice president and self-driving car evangelist Sebastian Thrun, made his name by creating virtual programs open to anyone, not paid online degrees like the one Georgia Tech is offering. He is, according to Fast Company, the “godfather of free online education.” Georgia Tech’s program has the technological trappings of a massive open online course, or MOOC, but it’s different from a MOOC in important ways. First, to get credit for the class you need to pony up $6,600. Second, graduates can claim a Master of Science degree that’s no different from the one someone sitting in a physical Georgia Tech classroom would receive—you don’t have to list “online” next to the MS on your résumé.

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-10-24/at-and-t-and-former-google-vp-back-georgia-tech-online-degree-program

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When a Penn Open Learning Class Ends, Continuing Education Does Not

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2014-11-03 01:06

by Jacquie Posey, U Penn

For students in University of Pennsylvania Open Learning courses, the online education provided in the global classroom doesn’t end when the courses do. “Growing Old Around the Globe” from Penn’s School of Nursing is a shining example of the college-level continuing education that can be found in Penn’s free massive open online courses. Students enrolled in the MOOC, first offered in 2013, created a community of learners around the world who are still sharing perspectives on aging and learning about gerontology via the course teaching team’s social media outreach. Archived video lessons are available for public viewing on YouTube.

http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/when-penn-open-learning-class-ends-continuing-education-does-not

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Gaming in the Post-Information School

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Mon, 2014-11-03 01:02

By Christopher Piehler, THE Journal

With a nearly ubiquitous Internet beaming all the world’s knowledge to an expanding universe of mobile devices, the ability to learn and retain information is becoming a smaller and smaller piece of the educational pie. Why waste time memorizing facts when your phone can remember them as quickly as your brain can? In this post-information age, forward-thinking schools are already looking beyond drill and kill to focus on 21st century skills (such as communication and collaboration) and higher-order thinking, which includes analyzing and evaluating. And if I’m being honest, a great way to teach all of those things is through playing games.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/10/22/gaming-in-the-post-information-school.aspx

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Chemistry

xkcd.com - Mon, 2014-11-03 01:00
Categories: Cartoons, Science News

Why online classes cost more money

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2014-11-02 01:09

by Zack Wellerman, Patriot Talon

As UT Tyler expands online resources for students and establishes the online-only University College, the cost of online courses continues to be higher for students compared to taking face-to-face classes. The fee for UT Tyler is $14 per credit hour or $42 per normal three credit hour course, and can only be spent on things that will further the success of online students, Assistant Vice President for Academic Innovation and Student Success Dr. Scott Marzilli said.

http://www.patriottalon.com/news/article_93b57a8a-5a5d-11e4-aefa-001a4bcf6878.html

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More online class opportunities should be available

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2014-11-02 01:05

by Nick Gray, Kentucky Kernel

Students’ burden has continued to rise as the cost of living and existing in college has grown in the last decade. Tuition costs have risen, as well as costs for books, living spaces and the like. Regardless of the choice, students will almost certainly require some source of income via a job outside of classes. The university should provide flexibility to students who are holding this extra burden by way of an increase of online classes and the introduction of online majors and minors. In the 2013-14 school year, 6.5 percent of total enrollments into classes at UK were into online classes, according to Vince Kellen, a senior associate provost at UK and the university’s chief information officer.

http://kykernel.com/2014/10/22/more-online-class-opportunities-should-be-available/

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Online Learning Revolution Energized By New Business

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sun, 2014-11-02 01:02

by Seb Murray, Business Because

The online learning revolution is coming to the office. Mooc makers and business schools are selling customized online courses to businesses – a lucrative market. The online learning revolution has broken into the boardroom. The developers of Moocs – massive open online courses – are teaming up with business schools to train executives in potentially lucrative courses ranging from cybersecurity to marketing. These developers have drawn huge audiences of millions globally to their free content which is developed by industry professionals and leading academics. For MBA and business school students, it means an online network of additional knowledge to tap into outside of the classroom, free of charge. For the learning technology companies that produce the courses, it is a way to turn their enormous popularity into cash, and widen their student pools.

http://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-distance-learning/2869/online-learning-revolution-gains-ground-with-businesses

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E-Library of Research Materials Bulks Up Literature Collection

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2014-11-01 01:09

By Michael Hart, Campus Technologies

Academic online database Researchomatic has added 20,000 new literature topics to its collection of nearly 4 million topics across a wide range of academic fields. Researchomatic.com is an e-library of essays, articles and research papers intended to help high school and college students as they prepare their own academic assignments. Students can search its database for specific topics. They will get multiple summaries of a few hundred words each on the topic they select. They can also copy and paste citation information that attributes the information to Researchomatic.com.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2014/10/22/elibrary-of-research-materials-bulks-up-literature-collection.aspx

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10 ways ed-tech tools promote academic honesty

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2014-11-01 01:04

By Andy Trus, eCampus News

Online assessment expert shares academic tools and resources for educators to prevent student plagiarism and promote academic-honesty. Going to the web for teaching and learning doesn’t have to be the den of student cheating (intentional or not) as some make it out to be. In fact, online tools–if you know how to choose and implement them–can promote academic honesty at whole new level. The internet empowers students with readily available means to compare answers, use outside resources, and look up answers to their online assignments and exams. With answers literally at their fingertips, instructors using ed-tech tools are often challenged with maintaining their students’ academic honesty.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/tech-academic-honesty-329/

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Harvard creates ‘Big Data’ course for social innovators

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Sat, 2014-11-01 01:02

By Marquis Cabrera, eCampus News

Harvard created a new course that started this semester–Data Science in Education: Big Data, Learning Analytics and the Information Age–with the intention to teach educators and social innovators the basics of big data. Which is critical, since big data has the ability to improve the provision of public services, enable governments to spend taxpayers’ monies more efficiently, and advance societies forward. However, before these innovations can happen, most in the field still need this basic question answered:”What exactly is BIG data?”

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/harvard-data-course-320/

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Magen-Darm-Tag am 08.11.2014

Gesundheitsberichterstattung - Fri, 2014-10-31 23:00
Ausgewählte Informationen zum Magen-Darm-Tag am 08.11.2014
Categories: Science News

What Happened To Women In Computer Science?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2014-10-31 22:29


Steve Henn, NPR, Oct 31, 2014

It's worth looking at this phenomenon.  When I worked in computing in 1980 half the staff were women. "For decades, the number of women studying computer science was growing faster than the number of men. But in 1984, something changed. The percentage of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged." What happened? asks NPR. Well, many things. But mostly this: " The share of women in computer science started falling at roughly the same moment when personal computers started showing up in U.S. homes in significant numbers... marketed almost entirely to men and boys. This idea that computers are for boys became a narrative. It became the story we told ourselves about the computing revolution. It helped define who geeks were, and it created techie culture." Today, 20 years later, we reap the fruits of a dysfunctional misogynistic culture (p.s. don't bother with the comments unless you want to be depressed all over again).

[Link] [Comment]

The grassroots of learning

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2014-10-31 22:29


Ryan Tracey, E-Learning Provocateur, Oct 31, 2014

Good article looking at 'the earlier Cormier' and 'the later Cormier' on the subject of rhizomatic learning. Me, I'm not so sure that what Dave Cormier had in mind was the idea of following link to link to link - but he is in a better position to correct (or not) the author on this. At any rate, the post was engaging, which is good enough for me. P.S. don't miss the comments, beginning with Crispin Weston's criticism of the concept of content and of the dynamics behind group formation (good, informed comment, well worth the price of admission).

[Link] [Comment]

Competency-Based Education: No More Semesters?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2014-10-31 22:29
Display


Anya Kamenetz, NPR Ed, Oct 31, 2014

OK, back in 1998 I  said that time would no longer be used as a measure of learning, "that time in online learning ceases to be an objective standard." I said things like "learning will be measured by the amount of information accumulated, not the amount of time spent in a chair" (I was less precise back then). Though I  supported such things as prior learning assessments I've never been keen on competencies. I learned working directly with teachers (eg. at the Brandon Adult Learning centre) that you can't just break down course content into a bunch of modules; more global variables come into play as well, and are captured by such artifacts as the term paper. Now where does that go on the test? Now in our current work we're deloping algorithms to detect competencies in expert performance. One perfectly acceptable result to me here is the null result, that is, a result showing that expert performance cannot be reduced to a set of necessary and sufficient competencies.

[Link] [Comment]

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