news (external)

Woolf University: the Airbnb of higher education or a sheep in wolf’s clothing?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2018-06-22 17:02

Tony Bates, Online learning and distance education resources, Jun 22, 2018

"You are going to hear a lot about Woolf University over the next year or so and possibly much longer," predicts Tony Bates. The reference is to a white paper titled Building the First Blockchain University (58 page PDF), which Bates recommends you read cover to cover. It will generate its own token, rely on smart contracts, and through these "support direct personal, individual apprenticeships in thinking." The model described is basically a distributed corporation similar to the model of the DAO (I wrote about it here). From the instructor's perspective, it really is (as Bates suggests) the Airbnb of learning. "This is in some ways a highly innovative proposal for a new type of university, but in other ways, it is a terribly conservative proposal, an extension of the Platonic dialogue to modern times. It could only have come from Oxford University academics, with its mix of blue sky dreaming, the latest technological buzz, and regression to cloistered academe," writes Bates. See also this article from last week in Forbes.

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The XaaS Economy is Here: How Well Are You Serving Your Customers?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2018-06-22 16:43

Stephan Sieber, ReadWrite, Jun 22, 2018

This is more of a business model change than a technology change, but it is certainly enabled by technology. Everything as a Service (XaaS) refers to an economy where "where products and services are delivered in a continuous relationship with the customer, rather than as a series of discrete individual sales." This article documents the transition to XaaS (describing those not using it as 'lagging behind'). It also describes a 'customer revolution' where "world-class technology and platforms are no longer exclusively the domain of large corporations and organizations" which means "an organization’s success will hinge far less on its access to software and technology, and far more on the most effective use and execution." I'm not sure that latter point is entirely true - the technology and information consumers have access to is a generation or two behind what large corporations can leverage. After all, how many people are running cloud networks in their living rooms?

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9 ways to use Artificial Intelligence in education

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Fri, 2018-06-22 15:29

Emily Watts, Big Data Made Simple, Jun 22, 2018

This isn't an especially deep article but it serves to prompt some thinking about the subject. The uses of AI include things like chat, personalized learning and automatic grading. I think that we could probably cast our imaginative nets more widely to include things like AI-supported performance assist with physical devices (like tennis rackets) and AI-enhanced job preparation and placement services, both of which have been talked about in these pages over the years. I did like the idea of using AI to supoport interval education; that's the first time I

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Preparing students for workplace of the future

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2018-06-22 02:10

By Shalina Chatlani, Education Dive
The workplace of the future will be marked by unprecedentedly advanced technologies, as well as a focus on incorporating artificial intelligence to drive higher levels of production with fewer resources. Employers and education stakeholders, noting the reality of this trend, are turning a reflective eye toward current students and questioning whether they will be workforce ready in the years to come. This has become a significant concern for higher education executives, who find their business models could be disrupted as they fail to meet workforce demands. A 2018 Gallup-Northeastern University survey shows that of 3,297 U.S. citizens interviewed, only 22% with a bachelor’s degree said their education left them “well” or “very well prepared” to use AI in their jobs.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/preparing-students-for-workplace-of-the-future/525536/

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Trustees add five initiatives to Purdue strategic plan – Purdue

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2018-06-22 02:05

The Purdue University Board of Trustees on Friday (June 15) reaffirmed Purdue Moves as the university’s current strategic plan and added five initiatives to the plan to reflect several strategic updates. Building on the original Purdue Moves plan, trustees voted to add online learning, data science, life sciences and three-year degrees as priority initiatives.

https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2018/Q2/trustees-add-five-initiatives-to-purdue-strategic-plan.html

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Final Day of the International Conference on E-Learning in the Workplace Conference at Columbia University

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Fri, 2018-06-22 02:02

By Cait Etherington, eLearning Inside

Dr. Guralnick, a faculty member at Columbia University and the founder and CEO of Kaleidoscope Learning, reflected, “I have always viewed ICELW as a fairly unique conference, in that we bring together researchers and practitioners from such a wide variety of countries and backgrounds.”  In early June, Guralnick told eLearning Inside News that among other highlights, he anticipated that this year’s conference would feature far more discussions on the integration of virtual reality and augmented reality. This certainly proved to be true over the course of the three-day meeting. While the conference did still attract a certain number of presenters engaged in asynchronous online learning projects, discussions of virtual reality, augmented reality, and mixed reality definitely dominated this year’s meeting.

Final Day of the ICELW Conference at Columbia University

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UTC is Enough for Everyone, Right?

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2018-06-21 22:45

Zach Holman, During, Jun 21, 2018

Among many other things, the NRC is the keeper of time for Canada, which lends a little extra relevance to this article. Additionally, anyone designing educational technology has encountered the hurdles of managing time with software. And most people will find this article an entertaining (if occasionally colourful) read. Via CSS-Tricks.

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Edu-business as usual—market-making in higher education

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2018-06-21 22:34

Ben Williamson, Code Acts in Education, Jun 21, 2018

Good article on what Pearson is doing in education with a great cover photo. And I really like the analysis of what it is exactly that Pearson is doing in education. Beginning from the precept that " markets do not simply appear," Ben Williamson focuses on an argument that shows "how the formerly non-market space of higher education has been reframed and re-made as an ‘education services market’, and subsequently how these HE markets work." The offering of goods and services that higher education might purchase is only the first step of the process. It wants to reshape that market, and "it has established itself as a distinctive market provider which is ‘transforming higher education’." Ultimately, though, by reshaping the market, "Pearson is seeking to build and maintain the market for its products to ensure its long-term stability and profitability."

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Seven deadly sins of online course design

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2018-06-21 22:25

Matthew Lynch, The Edvocate, Jun 21, 2018

This is a light read and, as a listicle, doesn't really have a coherent point to make, but it was also a fun read and some of the 'sins' were well spotted. My favourites included: overwhelming discussions, bad narration, and buried leads. I would have prefered a focused article that stressed that learning should be clear and accessible to students. But this will do for now. And ways to atone for each, which is the strength of the article.

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GitHub Education Is Now Free For Classroom Use

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2018-06-21 22:08

Henry Kronk, eLearningInside News, Jun 21, 2018

Microsoft has made two major acquisitions in recent days and then turned right around and made them free for educators. One, featured in this post, is GitHub. The other was FlipGrid, a student video discussion platform, which it made free for education (and even offered refunds) shortly after. This reminds me of Apple's strategy decades ago, a strategy of supporting education that resulted in a generation of enthusiastic support.

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Scientists Seek Genetic Data to Personalize Education

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2018-06-21 16:28

Ben Williamson, DML Central, Jun 21, 2018

This strikes me as a really bad idea, but I present it here so readers can judge for themselves. That said, as the article notes, "It raises significant concerns about biological discrimination and rekindles long debates about eugenics and the genetic inheritance of intelligence." The idea is that "educational genomics seeks to unpack the genetic factors involved in individual differences in learning ability, behavior, motivation, and achievement." The problem, as I see it, is that none of these are genetically based, and further, "the new geneism" may well be just another attempt to import bias and prejudice into the system. However, "the concept of “precision education” has begun to circulate among scientists who engage with psychology, neuroscience and genomics to understand learning processes."

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Americans believe two-thirds of news on social media is misinformation

OLDaily by Stephen Downes - Thu, 2018-06-21 16:17

Taylor Blatchford, Poynter, Jun 21, 2018

This will be presented differently depending on where you get the news, which I guess is part of the point. Here's how API summarizes it: "Americans believe 39 percent of news in newspapers, on TV or on the radio is misinformation and 65 percent of news on social media is made up or can’t be verified as accurate." Personally, I think this is probably a fairly accurate assessment. Part of the reason why there is so much mistrust in institutions these days is that these institutions have become untrustworthy.  There's probably no way to legislate trustworthiness, so don't worry, I'm not promoting a Tanzanian solution. But institutions - the media, universities, publishers, governments - need to find ways to regain that trust. This in turn help the rest of us establish credibility on social media. "The full reports on bias and inaccuracy, and views of misinformation, are available on the Knight Foundation's website."

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The Role of the Electronic Medical Record in the Intensive Care Unit Nurse's Detection of Patient Deterioration: A Qualitative Study.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2018-06-21 15:12
Related Articles

The Role of the Electronic Medical Record in the Intensive Care Unit Nurse's Detection of Patient Deterioration: A Qualitative Study.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2018 Jun;36(6):284-292

Authors: Despins LA, Wakefield BJ

Abstract
Failure to detect patient deterioration signals leads to longer stays in the hospital, worse functional outcomes, and higher hospital mortality rates. Surveillance, including ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data by the nurse, is essential for early risk detection. Electronic medical records promote accessibility and retrievability of patient data and can support patient surveillance. A secondary analysis was performed on interview data from 24 intensive care unit nurses, collected in a study that examined factors influencing nurse responses to alarms. Six themes describing nurses' use of electronic medical record information to understand the patients' norm and seven themes describing electronic medical record design issues were identified. Further work is needed on electronic medical record design to integrate documentation and information presentation with the nursing workflow. Organizations should involve bedside nurses in the design of handoff formats that provide key information common to all intensive care unit patient populations, as well as population-specific information.

PMID: 29601339 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

A Technology Intervention for Nurses Engaged in Preventing Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2018-06-21 15:12
Related Articles

A Technology Intervention for Nurses Engaged in Preventing Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2018 Jun;36(6):305-313

Authors: Rea K, Le-Jenkins U, Rutledge C

Abstract
Catheter-associated urinary tract infections account for 40% of healthcare-acquired infections. This study explored the addition of cloud-based software technology to an established nursing quality improvement program to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Unit-based nurse champions evaluated peers' evidence-based catheter-associated urinary tract infection prevention practices using manual, paper-based feedback. That process achieved reduced rates of catheter-associated urinary tract infection over 18 months. However, it was resource intensive. Cloud-based software technology was introduced to replace the paper. Nurse champions' satisfaction, catheter-associated urinary tract infection and indwelling urinary catheter utilization, and prevention practices were compared before and after the technology intervention. Compliance with the provision of a chlorhexidine bath demonstrated improvement (P = .003), while other practice measures did not significantly change. The indwelling urinary catheter utilization ratio was lower (P = .01), yet the intervention yielded no change in catheter-associated urinary tract infection rates. The short time interval of the intervention was potentially a contributing factor in no significant rate change. Nurse champions (N = 14) were more satisfied with the cloud-based technology (P = .004), the clarity of improvement targets (P = .004), and the speed of sharing data (P = .001). Their time to share data decreased from 4 days or more to 1 hour or less. Nurse champions readily adopted the cloud-based technology. These findings suggest additional research on technology innovations for nursing quality improvement is needed.

PMID: 29547410 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The Omaha System as a Structured Instrument for Bridging Nursing Informatics With Public Health Nursing Education: A Feasibility Study.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2018-06-21 15:12
Related Articles

The Omaha System as a Structured Instrument for Bridging Nursing Informatics With Public Health Nursing Education: A Feasibility Study.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2018 Jun;36(6):275-283

Authors: Eardley DL, Krumwiede KA, Secginli S, Garner L, DeBlieck C, Cosansu G, Nahcivan NO

Abstract
Advancements in healthcare systems include adoption of health information technology to ensure healthcare quality. Educators are challenged to determine strategies to integrate health information technology into nursing curricula for building a nursing workforce competent with electronic health records, standardized terminology, evidence-based practice, and evaluation. Nursing informatics, a growing specialty field, comprises health information technology relative to the profession of nursing. It is essential to integrate nursing informatics across nursing curricula to effectively position competent graduates in technology-laden healthcare environments. Nurse scholars developed and evaluated a nursing informatics case study assignment used in undergraduate level public health nursing courses. The assignment included an unfolding scenario followed by electronic health record charting using standardized terminology to guide the nursing process. The assignment was delivered either online or in class. Seventy-two undergraduate students completed the assignment and a posttest. Fifty-one students completed a satisfaction survey. Results indicated that students who completed the assignment online demonstrated a higher level of content mastery than those who completed the assignment in class. Content mastery was based on posttest results, which evaluated students' electronic health record charting for the nursing assessment, evidence-based interventions, and evaluations. This innovative approach may be valuable to educators in response to the National Academy of Sciences recommendations for healthcare education reform.

PMID: 29521668 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Using Technologies in Nursing Research Education: A Mixed Methods Case Study.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2018-06-21 15:12
Related Articles

Using Technologies in Nursing Research Education: A Mixed Methods Case Study.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2018 Jun;36(6):293-304

Authors: Luo S, Yang HH

Abstract
To better prepare nurses for the new and expanding roles required in healthcare, faculty are expected to integrate emerging technology into educational processes. Using a mixed methods research design, this study aimed to examine nursing student reactions and learning based on their participation in an online research course through two technology-enhanced assignments: (1) annotation of the structure of a research article and (2) reflection on the content of a research article. Quantitative analysis examined students' questionnaire responses, and qualitative analysis explored students' reflective learning journals and the instructor's notes. These two separate strands of data were then integrated using a joint display. The discussion was guided by two components of the New World Kirkpatrick model, reaction and learning. Our findings suggest that the use of technology in the design of assignments is a way to engage students in learning and can be used to enhance nursing students' research learning online.

PMID: 29494359 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

Benefits of Implementing and Improving Collection of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data in Electronic Health Records.

NLM - Nursing Informatics - Thu, 2018-06-21 15:12
Related Articles

Benefits of Implementing and Improving Collection of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data in Electronic Health Records.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2018 Jun;36(6):267-274

Authors: Bosse JD, Leblanc RG, Jackman K, Bjarnadottir RI

Abstract
Individuals in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities experience several disparities in physical and mental health (eg, cardiovascular disease and depression), as well as difficulty accessing care that is compassionate and relevant to their unique needs. Access to care is compromised in part due to inadequate information systems that fail to capture identity data. Beginning in January 2018, meaningful use criteria dictate that electronic health records have the capability to collect data related to sexual orientation and gender identity of patients. Nurse informaticists play a vital role in the process of developing new electronic health records that are sensitive to the needs and identities of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities. Improved collection of sexual orientation and gender identity data will advance the identification of health disparities experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender populations. More inclusive electronic health records will allow providers to monitor risk behavior, assess progress toward the reduction of disparities, and provide healthcare that is patient and family centered. Concrete suggestions for the modification of electronic health record systems are presented, as well as how nurse informaticists may be able to bridge gaps in provider knowledge and discomfort through interprofessional collaboration when implementing changes in electronic health records.

PMID: 29406395 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

The Omaha System as a Structured Instrument for Bridging Nursing Informatics With Public Health Nursing Education: A Feasibility Study.

Related Articles

The Omaha System as a Structured Instrument for Bridging Nursing Informatics With Public Health Nursing Education: A Feasibility Study.

Comput Inform Nurs. 2018 Jun;36(6):275-283

Authors: Eardley DL, Krumwiede KA, Secginli S, Garner L, DeBlieck C, Cosansu G, Nahcivan NO

Abstract
Advancements in healthcare systems include adoption of health information technology to ensure healthcare quality. Educators are challenged to determine strategies to integrate health information technology into nursing curricula for building a nursing workforce competent with electronic health records, standardized terminology, evidence-based practice, and evaluation. Nursing informatics, a growing specialty field, comprises health information technology relative to the profession of nursing. It is essential to integrate nursing informatics across nursing curricula to effectively position competent graduates in technology-laden healthcare environments. Nurse scholars developed and evaluated a nursing informatics case study assignment used in undergraduate level public health nursing courses. The assignment included an unfolding scenario followed by electronic health record charting using standardized terminology to guide the nursing process. The assignment was delivered either online or in class. Seventy-two undergraduate students completed the assignment and a posttest. Fifty-one students completed a satisfaction survey. Results indicated that students who completed the assignment online demonstrated a higher level of content mastery than those who completed the assignment in class. Content mastery was based on posttest results, which evaluated students' electronic health record charting for the nursing assessment, evidence-based interventions, and evaluations. This innovative approach may be valuable to educators in response to the National Academy of Sciences recommendations for healthcare education reform.

PMID: 29521668 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Categories: nursing informatics

An Upbeat Higher Ed SOLA+R Conference

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Thu, 2018-06-21 02:14

by Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

The one area where higher ed malaise seems largely absent is in the world of online learning. At least that is what I found after hanging out for a few days in DC at the UPCEA powered SOLA+R. I can’t remember when I’ve been with a group of 400+ positive higher ed people. Why were the online learning leaders who gathered at SOLA+R so upbeat? My theory is that, like most everything else in higher ed, the answer comes down to money. Online education has a business model.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/upbeat-higher-ed-solar-conference

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Study: People Remember Information Better Through VR

Online learning update by Ray Schroeder - Thu, 2018-06-21 02:11

By Rhea Kelly, Campus Technology

University of Maryland found that people recall information better when it is presented to them in a virtual environment, as opposed to a desktop computer. The researchers asked 40 volunteers to familiarize themselves with printouts of well-known faces, such as Abraham Lincoln, the Dalai Lama, Arnold Schwarzenegger and Marilyn Monroe. Participants were then shown the faces placed in various locations within a “memory palace,” an imaginary physical location designed to promote “spatial mnemonic encoding,” or visual-based recall of an object in a specific place.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/06/14/study-people-remember-information-better-through-vr.aspx

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